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The Cruise Passenger’s Rights and Remedies 2014: The COSTA CONCORDIA Disaster: One Year Later, Many More Incidents Both on Board Megaships and During Risky Shore Excursions

July 11, 2014 Comments off

The Cruise Passenger’s Rights and Remedies 2014: The COSTA CONCORDIA Disaster: One Year Later, Many More Incidents Both on Board Megaships and During Risky Shore Excursions (PDF)
Source: Tulane Maritime Law Journal

Between January 2012 and May 2013, there were a series of disasters involving, inter alia, a megaship thought to be unsinkable that sank faster than the TITANIC, megaships thought to be fireproof that were not, and megaships thought to be secured by appropriate backup systems, both mechanical and electrical, that did not exist.

Modern cruise ships are best view ed as floating deluxe hotels that transport their guests from exotic port to exotic port where they stay a few hours for shopping, snorkeling, scuba diving, jet skiing, parasailing, and touring. Although there are problems on board cruise ships, generally it is safer to be on board than on a shore excursion. However, shore excursions are highly promoted 11 by the cruise lines, generate substantial revenues, and cause an increasing number of reported deaths and serious injuries to cruise passengers. Examples of such injuries include quadriplegia after an unforgettable swim at Lover’s Beach in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico; 13 quadriplegia after ta king a dive at Señor Frog’s Restaurant in Cozumel, Mexico; 14 being shot to death near Coki Beach in St. Thomas; 15 injury while riding an ATV in Acapulco, Mexico; 16 being struck by lightning during a catamaran ride in Montego Bay, Jamaica; 17 injury during a zip-line excursion in Jamaica; 18 assault and robbery during an excursion to Earth Village in Nassau; 19 slip and fall during a Laughton Glacier Hike Tour; 20 asphyxiation in a diving bell in Bermuda; 21 death while parasailing in Cozumel, Mexico; 22 death after being run over by a tour bus after re turning from the Ra in Forest Aerial Tram in Dominica; 23 and death after a tour bus ran off a mountain road in Chile.

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From Decline to Recovery: A Rescue Package for the Global Ocean

June 30, 2014 Comments off

From Decline to Recovery: A Rescue Package for the Global Ocean (PDF)
Source: Global Ocean Commission
From Report Summary (PDF):

The compelling evidence of ocean decline, in the high seas and as a result of high seas resource extraction, has fired our conscience and concern. The Commission was determined to identify solutions that will directly and effectively put us on track to shifting from a vicious cycle of decline to a virtuous cycle of high seas recovery. Our drive to turn things round – our imagination and our commitment – has been fired by good and sometimes inspiring examples of sustainable and even rejuvenating practice. We are confident about and encouraged by the availability of viable solutions stemming from the huge advances in marine science and understanding; the growing awareness and engagement of global citizens in ocean issues; and the new focus on the ocean within the global climate change and UN post-2015 global development debates. We believe that the opportunity and time to address the threats facing the global ocean is now.

In the following pages we set out our proposals for reversing the cycle of decline. The eight proposals provide a carefully targeted rescue package for the high seas. The proposals form a coherent whole. They specifically address the weaknesses in governance, the lack of equity and sustainability regarding the use of high seas resources, and the new and emerging pressures that need to be pre-empted before undue harm is caused. In each case, we have seen what works and have been inspired by it.

There are clear economic incentives for both the public and private sectors to take their responsibilities in the high seas more seriously. Without stronger governance and regulation, uncertainty will continue to pervade ocean-related industries and reduce profits. Without globally agreed standards and guidelines in the emerging sectors such as offshore oil and gas and deep sea mineral extraction, the risks and liabilities will be hard to assess and control. Most of all, without urgent global action to prevent climate change, and efforts to build resilience against its impacts, the cost to the global economy will rise exponentially. We can continue to lay cables and ship containers across a dead ocean, but without paying attention to sustaining the life within it, we put our own lives and those of every living thing in peril.

New From the GAO

June 24, 2014 Comments off

New From the GAO
Source: Government Accountability Office

Reports

1. Maritime Security: Ongoing U.S. Counterpiracy Efforts Would Benefit From Agency Assessments. GAO-14-422, June 19.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-422
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/664269.pdf

2. Combating Terrorism: U.S. Efforts in Northwest Africa Would Be Strengthened by Enhanced Program Management. GAO-14-518, June 24.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-518
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/664335.pdf
Podcast – http://www.gao.gov/multimedia/podcasts/664322

3. Private Health Insurance: The Range of Average Annual Premiums in the Small Group Market by State in Early 2013. GAO-14-524R, May 28.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-524R

4. Public Transportation: Federal Role Key to Rural and Tribal Transit. GAO-14-589, June 24.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-589
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/664339.pdf

5. Prepositioned Stocks: DOD’s Strategic Policy and Implementation Plan. GAO-14-659R, June 24.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-659R

6. Transportation Security Information Sharing: Stakeholder Satisfaction Varies; TSA Could Take Additional Actions to Strengthen Efforts. GAO-14-506, June 24.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-506
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/664349.pdf

Related Product

Transportation Security Information Sharing: Results of GAO’s Survey of Stakeholder Satisfaction with TSA Products and Mechanisms (GAO-14-488SP, June 2014), an E-supplement to GAO-14-506. GAO-14-488SP, June 24.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-488SP

Testimony

1. Explosives Detection Canines: TSA Has Taken Steps to Analyze Canine Team Data and Assess the Effectiveness of Passenger Screening Canines, by Jennifer Grover, acting director, homeland security and justice, before the Subcommittee on Transportation Security, House Committee on Homeland Security. GAO-14-659T, June 24.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-695T
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/664330.pdf

CRS — Coast Guard Polar Icebreaker Modernization: Background and Issues for Congress

June 17, 2014 Comments off

Coast Guard Polar Icebreaker Modernization: Background and Issues for Congress (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

The Coast Guard’s FY2013 budget initiated a new project for the design and construction of a new polar icebreaker. The project received $7.609 million in FY2013 and $2.0 million in FY2014. The Coast Guard’s proposed FY2015 budget requests $6 million to continue initial acquisition activities for the ship.

Coast Guard polar icebreakers perform a variety of missions supporting U.S. interests in polar regions. The Coast Guard’s two existing heavy polar icebreakers—Polar Star and Polar Sea— have exceeded their originally intended 30-year service lives. Polar Star was placed in caretaker status on July 1, 2006. Congress in FY2009 and FY2010 provided funding to repair it and return it to service for an additional 7 to 10 years of service; the repair work was completed and the ship was reactivated on December 14, 2012. On June 25, 2010, the Coast Guard announced that Polar Sea had suffered an unexpected engine casualty; the ship was unavailable for operation after that. The Coast Guard placed Polar Sea in commissioned, inactive status on October 14, 2011.

The Coast Guard’s third polar icebreaker—Healy—entered service in 2000. Compared to Polar Star and Polar Sea, Healy has less icebreaking capability (it is considered a medium polar icebreaker), but more capability for supporting scientific research. The ship is used primarily for supporting scientific research in the Arctic.

See also: Coast Guard Cutter Procurement: Background and Issues for Congress (PDF)

U.S. Coast Guard releases report of investigation of the sinking of the tall ship Bounty

June 15, 2014 Comments off

U.S. Coast Guard releases report of investigation of the sinking of the tall ship Bounty
Source: U.S. Coast Guard

Today the U.S. Coast Guard released its report of investigation of the October 2012 sinking of the tall ship Bounty, during which one crewmember died and another remains missing and is presumed dead, off the coast of Cape Hatteras, N.C.

The findings in the report conclude that a combination of faulty management and crew risk assessment procedures contributed to the sinking. Specifically, choosing to navigate a vessel in insufficient material condition in close proximity to an approaching hurricane with an inexperienced crew was highlighted.

CRS –Navy Ship Names: Background for Congress

June 12, 2014 Comments off

Navy Ship Names: Background for Congress (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

Names for Navy ships traditionally have been chosen and announced by the Secretary of the Navy, under the direction of the President and in accordance with rules prescribed by Congress. Rules for giving certain types of names to certain types of Navy ships have evolved over time. There have been exceptions to the Navy’s ship-naming rules, particularly for the purpose of naming a ship for a person when the rule for that type of ship would have called for it to be named for something else. Some observers in recent years have perceived a breakdown in, or corruption of, the rules for naming Navy ships. On July 13, 2012, the Navy submitted to Congress a 73-page report on the Navy’s policies and practices for naming ships. The report, which was submitted in response to Section 1014 of the FY2012 National Defense Authorization Act (H.R. 1540/P.L. 112-81 of December 31, 2011), states: “Current ship naming policies and practices fall well within the historic spectrum of policies and practices for naming vessels of the Navy, and are altogether consistent with ship naming customs and traditions.”

CRS — Navy Irregular Warfare and Counterterrorism Operations: Background and Issues for Congress

June 12, 2014 Comments off

Navy Irregular Warfare and Counterterrorism Operations: Background and Issues for Congress (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

The Navy for several years has carried out a variety of irregular warfare (IW) and counterterrorism (CT) activities. Among the most readily visible of the Navy’s recent IW operations have been those carried out by Navy sailors serving ashore in Afghanistan and Iraq. Many of the Navy’s contributions to IW operations around the world are made by Navy individual augmentees (IAs)—individual Navy sailors assigned to various Department of Defense (DOD) operations.

The May 1-2, 2011, U.S. military operation in Abbottabad, Pakistan, that killed Osama bin Laden reportedly was carried out by a team of 23 Navy special operations forces, known as SEALs (an acronym standing for Sea, Air, and Land). The SEALs reportedly belonged to an elite unit known unofficially as Seal Team 6 and officially as the Naval Special Warfare Development Group (DEVGRU).

NOAA study shows educating, warning, and citing speeding mariners helps lower ship speeds in areas with endangered North Atlantic Right Whales

June 12, 2014 Comments off

NOAA study shows educating, warning, and citing speeding mariners helps lower ship speeds in areas with endangered North Atlantic Right Whales
Source: NOAA

NOAA’s policy of notifying — but not necessarily citing — speeding vessels in protected areas along the East Coast was effective in lowering their speeds through these sensitive areas, protecting the critically endangered North Atlantic right whales from ship collisions, while keeping punitive fines to mariners to a minimum, according to a new study.

A NOAA regulation, instituted in December 2008, requires vessels 65 feet or greater in length to travel at speeds of 10 knots or less in areas seasonally occupied by the critically endangered North Atlantic right whale.

The NOAA-led study looked the compliance with speed regulations by 8,009 individual vessels that made more than 200,000 trips between November 2008 and August 2013, mostly in areas where the endangered whales are known to travel. Some were remotely monitored by radio signals sent from the vessels.
Virtually all ships received notification of the speed regulations. The owners or operators of 437 of these ships received non-punitive notifications of violations and were reminded of the regulation, or cited after they were observed violating the restrictions. Twenty-six of them received citations and were fined.

Compliance with the regulation was low at the beginning of the regulatory period but steadily improved, according to the study. Vessels that received fines or citations later showed improved compliance. Informational letters issued by NOAA’s Office of Law Enforcement, monthly public summaries of vessel operations, and direct at-sea radio contact also were effective in keeping the vessels in compliance with the law.

New From the GAO

June 11, 2014 Comments off

New GAO Report and Testimonies
Source: Government Accountability Office

Reports

1. Surface Ships: Navy Needs to Revise Its Decommissioning Policy to Improve Future Decision Making. GAO-14-412, June 11.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-412
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/664052.pdf

2. Airline Competition: The Average Number of Competitors in Markets Serving the Majority of Passengers Has Changed Little in Recent Years, but Stakeholders Voice Concerns about Competition. GAO-14-515, June 11.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-515
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/664061.pdf

3. Department of Defense’s Waiver of Competitive Prototyping Requirement for the Army’s Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2, Block 1 Program. GAO-14-643R, June 11.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-643R

Testimony

1. U.S. Currency: Actions Needed to Improve Coin Inventory Management, by Lorelei St. James, director, physical infrastructure, before the Subcommittee on Monetary Policy and Trade, House Committee on Financial Services. GAO-14-601T, June 11.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-601T
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/664044.pdf

New From the GAO

June 5, 2014 Comments off

New GAO Reports
Source: Government Accountability Office

1. Maritime Critical Infrastructure Protection: DHS Needs to Better Address Port Cybersecurity. GAO-14-459, June 5.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-459
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/663824.pdf

2. Fusion Energy: Actions Needed to Finalize Cost and Schedule Estimates for U.S. Contributions to an International Experimental Reactor. GAO-14-499, June 5.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-499
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/663833.pdf

New From the GAO

June 4, 2014 Comments off

New GAO Reports and Testimonies
Source: Government Accountability Office

Reports

1. Export Promotion: Trade Agencies Should Enhance Collaboration with State and Local Partners. GAO-14-393, May 21.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-393
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/663363.pdf

2. DHS Intelligence Analysis: Additional Actions Needed to Address Analytic Priorities and Workforce Challenges. GAO-14-397, June 4.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-397
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/663793.pdf

3. Education Grants: Promise Neighborhoods Promotes Collaboration but Needs National Evaluation Plan. GAO-14-432, May 5.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-432
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/663000.pdf

Testimonies

1. Maritime Security: Progress and Challenges with Selected Port Security Programs, by Stephen L. Caldwell, director, homeland security and justice, before the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. GAO-14-636T, June 4.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-636T
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/663783.pdf

2. Consumer’s Location Data: Companies Take Steps to Protect Privacy, but Practices Are Inconsistent, and Risks May Not Be Clear to Consumers, by Mark L. Goldstein, director, physical infrastructure issues, before the Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law, Senate Committee on the Judiciary. GAO-14-649T, June 4.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-649T
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/663786.pdf

CRS — Navy TAO(X) Oiler Shipbuilding Program: Background and Issues for Congress

May 27, 2014 Comments off

Navy TAO(X) Oiler Shipbuilding Program: Background and Issues for Congress (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

The TAO(X) oiler shipbuilding program is a program to build a new class of fleet oilers for the Navy. The primary role of Navy fleet oilers is to transfer fuel to Navy surface ships that are operating at sea, so as to extend the operating endurance of these surface ships and their embarked aircraft. The Navy wants to procure the first TAO(X) in FY2016. The program has received a total of $62.5 million in research and development funding through FY2014.

The Navy’s proposed FY2015 budget does not request any funding for the TAO(X) program; the Navy states that FY2015 activities for the program will be financed by funds carried over from FY2014. The Navy’s FY2015 budget submission projects a request for $682.1 million in funding in FY2016 for the procurement of the lead ship.

CRS — Navy LX(R) Amphibious Ship Program: Background and Issues for Congress

May 19, 2014 Comments off

Navy LX(R) Amphibious Ship Program: Background and Issues for Congress (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

The LX(R) program is a program to build a new class of 11 amphibious ships for the Navy. The Navy wants to procure the first LX(R) in FY2020, and is currently examining design concepts for the ship.

The primary function of Navy amphibious ships is to lift (i.e., transport) U.S. Marines and their equipment and supplies to distant operating areas, and enable Marines to conduct expeditionary operations ashore in those areas. Although amphibious ships are designed to support Marine landings against opposing military forces, they are also used for operations in permissive or benign situations where there are no opposing forces.

The Navy wants to procure 11 LX(R)s as replacements for 12 aging Whidbey Island/Harpers Ferry (LSD-41/49) class amphibious ships, the first of which will reach age 40 in 2025. The Navy wants to procure the first four LX(R)s in FY2020, FY2022, FY2024, and FY2026, and the remaining seven ships at a rate of one per year during the period FY2028-FY2034. If this procurement schedule were implemented, the Navy projects that the first two ships would enter service in FY2026 and the 11th would enter service in 2038.

The LX(R) program has received a total of $23.6 million in research and development funding through FY2014. The Navy’s FY2015 budget submission requests $36.9 million in additional research and development funding for the program.

Issues for Congress include whether to approve, reject, or modify the Navy’s request for FY2015 research and development funding for the LX(R) program; whether to provide the Navy with guidance concerning the cost, capability, or acquisition strategy for the program; and whether to provide funding in FY2015 for the procurement of an additional San Antonio (LPD-17) class amphibious ship, in part as an industrial base bridge from the LPD-17 program to the start of the LX(R) program.

New From the GAO

April 18, 2014 Comments off

New GAO Reports
Source: Government Accountability Office

1. Nuclear Weapons: Technology Development Efforts for the Uranium Processing Facility. GAO-14-295, April 18.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-295
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/662665.pdf

2. Maritime Infrastructure: Key Issues Related to Commercial Activity in the U.S. Arctic over the Next Decade. GAO-14-299, March 19.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-299
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/661762.pdf

3. Medicare Imaging Accreditation: Effect on Access to Advanced Diagnostic Imaging Is Unclear amid Other Policy Changes. GAO-14-378, April 18.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-378
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/662659.pdf

4. Large Partnerships: Characteristics of Population and IRS Audits. GAO-14-379R, March 19.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-379R

CRS — Navy Shipboard Lasers for Surface, Air, and Missile Defense: Background and Issues for Congress

April 14, 2014 Comments off

Navy Shipboard Lasers for Surface, Air, and Missile Defense: Background and Issues for Congress (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

Department of Defense (DOD) development work on high-energy military lasers, which has been underway for decades, has reached the point where lasers capable of countering certain surface and air targets at ranges of about a mile could be made ready for installation on Navy surface ships over the next few years. More powerful shipboard lasers, which could become ready for installation in subsequent years, could provide Navy surface ships with an ability to counter a wider range of surface and air targets at ranges of up to about 10 miles.

CRS — Maritime Territorial and Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) Disputes Involving China: Issues for Congress

March 26, 2014 Comments off

Maritime Territorial and Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) Disputes Involving China: Issues for Congress (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

China’s actions for asserting and defending its maritime territorial and exclusive economic zone (EEZ) claims in the East China (ECS) and South China Sea (SCS), particularly since late 2013, have heightened concerns among observers that ongoing disputes over these waters and some of the islands within them could lead to a crisis or conflict between China and a neighboring country such as Japan, the Philippines, or Vietnam, and that the United States could be drawn into such a crisis or conflict as a result of obligations the United States has under bilateral security treaties with Japan and the Philippines.

More broadly, China’s actions for asserting and defending its maritime territorial and EEZ claims have led to increasing concerns among some observers that China may be seeking to dominate or gain control of its near-seas region, meaning the ECS, the SCS, and the Yellow Sea. Chinese domination over or control of this region, or Chinese actions that are perceived as being aimed at achieving such domination or control, could have major implications for the United States, including implications for U.S.-China relations, for interpreting China’s rise as a major world power, for the security structure of the Asia-Pacific region, for the longstanding U.S. strategic goal of preventing the emergence of a regional hegemon in one part of Eurasia or another, and for two key elements of the U.S.-led international order that has operated since World War II—the non-use of force or coercion as a means of settling disputes between countries, and freedom of the seas.

CRS — EPA’s Vessel General Permit: Background and Issues

March 11, 2014 Comments off

EPA’s Vessel General Permit: Background and Issues (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via University of North Texas)

In November 2011 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed two Clean Water Act (CWA) permits to regulate certain types of vessel discharges into U.S. waters. The proposed permits would replace a single Vessel General Permit (VGP) issued in 2008 that was due to expire in December 2013. As proposed, the permits would apply to approximately 71,000 large domestic and foreign vessels and perhaps as many as 138,000 small vessels. This universe of regulated entities is diverse as well as large, consisting of tankers, freighters, barges, cruise ships and other passenger vessels, and commercial fishing vessels. Their discharges are similarly diverse, including among other pollutants aquatic nuisance species (ANS), nutrients, pathogens, oil and grease, metals, and toxic chemical compounds that can have a broad array of effects on aquatic species and human health, many of which can be harmful.

EPA proposed two permits, one (draft VGP) for large vessels to replace the 2008 VGP, and one for smaller vessels covered by a congressionally enacted temporary moratorium (draft sVGP). Both were proposed well in advance of the VGP’s expiration to provide ample time for the regulated community to prepare for new requirements. On March 28, 2013, EPA issued a final version of the VGP for large vessels. It took effect December 19, 2013. The permit for smaller vessels is still under review.

CRS — China Naval Modernization: Implications for U.S. Navy Capabilities — Background and Issues for Congress

March 10, 2014 Comments off

China Naval Modernization: Implications for U.S. Navy Capabilities — Background and Issues for Congress (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

China is building a modern and regionally powerful Navy with a modest but growing capability for conducting operations beyond China’s near-seas region. The question of how the United States should respond to China’s military modernization effort, including its naval modernization effort, has emerged as a key issue in U.S. defense planning. The question is of particular importance to the U.S. Navy, because many U.S. military programs for countering improved Chinese military forces would fall within the Navy’s budget.

As a part of the U.S. strategic rebalancing toward the Asia-Pacific region announced in January 2012, Department of Defense (DOD) planning is placing an increased emphasis on the Asia- Pacific region. Observers expect that, as a result, there will be a stronger emphasis in DOD planning on U.S. naval and air forces. Administration officials have stated that notwithstanding constraints on U.S. defense spending, the U.S. military presence in the Asia-Pacific region will be maintained and strengthened.

CRS — Navy Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) Program: Background and Issues for Congress (updated)

March 6, 2014 Comments off

Navy Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) Program: Background and Issues for Congress
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

On February 24, 2014, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel announced that the Department of Defense (DOD) intends to truncate the Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program to 32 ships— a reduction of 20 ships from the previously planned total of 52 LCSs. Through FY2014, a total of 20 LCSs have been funded. Under the Navy’s FY2014 budget submission, LCSs 21 through 24 were scheduled to be requested for procurement in FY2015.

As a successor to the LCS program, Secretary Hagel announced on February 24 that the Navy is to submit “alternative proposals to procure a capable and lethal small surface combatant, generally consistent with the capabilities of a frigate. I’ve directed the Navy to consider a completely new design, existing ship designs, and a modified LCS.”

New From the GAO

February 12, 2014 Comments off

New From the GAO
Source: Government Accountability Office

Reports

1. Computer Matching Act: OMB and Selected Agencies Need to Ensure Consistent Implementation. GAO-14-44, January 13.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-44
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/660141.pdf

2. Department Of Homeland Security: Ammunition Purchases Have Declined Since 2009. GAO-14-119, January 13.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-119
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/660144.pdf

3. Maritime Administration: Ship Disposal Program Needs Improved Communications and Updated Strategic Plan. GAO-14-223, February 12.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-223
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/660900.pdf

4. Information Technology: HUD’s Expenditure Plan Satisfied Statutory Conditions; Sustained Controls and Modernization Approach Needed. GAO-14-283, February 12.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-283
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/660863.pdf

Testimony

1. Extreme Weather Events: Limiting Federal Fiscal Exposure and Increasing the Nation’s Resilience, by Mark Gaffigan, managing director, natural resources and environment, before the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. GAO-14-364T, February 12.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-364T
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/660861.pdf

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