Archive

Archive for the ‘influenza’ Category

Prevention and Control of Seasonal Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) — United States, 2014–15 Influenza Season

August 15, 2014 Comments off

Prevention and Control of Seasonal Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) — United States, 2014–15 Influenza Season
Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (CDC)

This report updates the 2013 recommendations by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) regarding use of seasonal influenza vaccines (1). Updated information for the 2014–15 influenza season includes 1) antigenic composition of U.S. seasonal influenza vaccines; 2) vaccine dose considerations for children aged 6 months through 8 years; and 3) a preference for the use, when immediately available, of live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) for healthy children aged 2 through 8 years, to be implemented as feasible for the 2014–15 season but not later than the 2015–16 season. Information regarding issues related to influenza vaccination not addressed in this report is available in the 2013 ACIP seasonal influenza recommendations (1).

About these ads

Influenza Activity — United States, 2013–14 Season and Composition of the 2014–15 Influenza Vaccines

June 9, 2014 Comments off

Influenza Activity — United States, 2013–14 Season and Composition of the 2014–15 Influenza Vaccines
Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (CDC)

During the 2013–14 influenza season in the United States, influenza activity increased through November and December before peaking in late December. Influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 (pH1N1) viruses predominated overall, but influenza B viruses and, to a lesser extent, influenza A (H3N2) viruses also were reported in the United States. This influenza season was the first since the 2009 pH1N1 pandemic in which pH1N1 viruses predominated and was characterized overall by lower levels of outpatient illness and mortality than influenza A (H3N2)–predominant seasons, but higher rates of hospitalization among adults aged 50–64 years compared with recent years. This report summarizes influenza activity in the United States for the 2013–14 influenza season (September 29, 2013–May 17, 2014) and reports recommendations for the components of the 2014–15 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccines.

Effectiveness of influenza vaccine against life-threatening RT-PCR-confirmed influenza illness in US children, 2010-2012

April 4, 2014 Comments off

Effectiveness of influenza vaccine against life-threatening RT-PCR-confirmed influenza illness in US children, 2010-2012
Source: Journal of Infectious Diseases

Background. 
No studies have examined the effectiveness of influenza vaccine against ICU admission associated with influenza virus infection among children.

Methods. 
In 2010-11 and 2011-12, children aged 6 months to 17 years admitted to 21 US pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) with acute severe respiratory illness and testing positive for influenza were enrolled as cases; children who tested negative were PICU controls. Community controls were children without an influenza-related hospitalization, matched to cases by comorbidities and geographic region. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated with logistic regression models.

Results. 
We analyzed data from 44 cases, 172 PICU controls, and 93 community controls. Eighteen percent of cases, 31% of PICU controls, and 51% of community controls were fully vaccinated. Compared to unvaccinated children, children who were fully vaccinated were 74% (95% CI, 19 to 91%) or 82% (95% CI, 23 to 96%) less likely to be admitted to a PICU for influenza compared to PICU controls or community controls, respectively. Receipt of one dose of vaccine among children for whom two doses were recommended was not protective.

Conclusion. 
During the 2010-11 and 2011-12 US influenza seasons, influenza vaccination was associated with a three-quarters reduction in the risk of life-threatening influenza illness in children.

Issue Brief: As Flu Season Ramps Up, Adults 18-64 Years Old Least Likely to Get Flu Shots

January 17, 2014 Comments off

Issue Brief: As Flu Season Ramps Up, Adults 18-64 Years Old Least Likely to Get Flu Shots
Source: Trust for America’s Health

An analysis by the Trust for America’s Health (TFAH) found that only 35.7 percent of adults ages 18 to 64 years old got the flu shot last season (the most recent period data with available data). By comparison, 56.6 percent of children (ages 6 months to 17 years old) and 66.2 percent of seniors (ages 65 and older) were vaccinated. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends all American 6 months and older get vaccinated each year.

According to the CDC, the flu season in the United States is beginning to “ramp” up and flu is now widespread in 35 states. Rates are particularly high in 13 Southern and Central/Western states (Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Texas and Utah).

H1N1 is the most prevalent flu strain this season, which can disproportionately and adversely impact otherwise healthy children and young adults, according to the CDC.

Estimated Influenza Illnesses and Hospitalizations Averted by Influenza Vaccination — United States, 2012–13 Influenza Season

December 24, 2013 Comments off

Estimated Influenza Illnesses and Hospitalizations Averted by Influenza Vaccination — United States, 2012–13 Influenza Season
Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (CDC)

Influenza is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality each year in the United States. From 1976 to 2007, annual deaths from influenza ranged from approximately 3,300 to 49,000 (1). Vaccination against influenza has been recommended to prevent illness and related complications, and since 2010, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has recommended that all persons aged ≥6 months be vaccinated against influenza each year (2). In 2013, CDC published a model to quantify the annual number of influenza-associated illnesses and hospitalizations averted by influenza vaccination during the 2006–11 influenza seasons (3). Using that model with 2012–13 influenza season vaccination coverage rates, influenza vaccine effectiveness, and influenza hospitalization rates, CDC estimated that vaccination resulted in 79,000 (17%) fewer hospitalizations during the 2012–13 influenza season than otherwise might have occurred. Based on estimates of the percentage of influenza illnesses that involve hospitalization or medical attention, vaccination also prevented approximately 6.6 million influenza illnesses and 3.2 million medically attended illnesses. Influenza vaccination during the 2012–13 season produced a substantial reduction in influenza-associated illness. However, fewer than half of persons aged ≥6 months were vaccinated. Higher vaccination rates would have resulted in prevention of a substantial number of additional cases and hospitalizations.

Bayesian Analysis of Epidemics – Zombies, Influenza, and other Diseases

December 4, 2013 Comments off

Bayesian Analysis of Epidemics – Zombies, Influenza, and other Diseases
Source: arXiv.org

Mathematical models of epidemic dynamics offer significant insight into predicting and controlling infectious diseases. The dynamics of a disease model generally follow a susceptible, infected, and recovered (SIR) model, with some standard modifications. In this paper, we extend the work of Munz et.al (2009) on the application of disease dynamics to the so-called “zombie apocalypse”, and then apply the identical methods to influenza dynamics. Unlike Munz et.al (2009), we include data taken from specific depictions of zombies in popular culture films and apply Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods on improved dynamical representations of the system. To demonstrate the usefulness of this approach, beyond the entertaining example, we apply the identical methodology to Google Trend data on influenza to establish infection and recovery rates. Finally, we discuss the use of the methods to explore hypothetical intervention policies regarding disease outbreaks.

Prevention and Control of Seasonal Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices — United States, 2013–2014

October 3, 2013 Comments off

Prevention and Control of Seasonal Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices — United States, 2013–2014
Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (CDC)

This report updates the 2012 recommendations by CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) regarding the use of influenza vaccines for the prevention and control of seasonal influenza (CDC. Prevention and control of influenza with vaccines: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices [ACIP]. MMWR 2012;61:613–8). Routine annual influenza vaccination is recommended for all persons aged ≥6 months. For the 2013–14 influenza season, it is expected that trivalent live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV3) will be replaced by a quadrivalent LAIV formulation (LAIV4). Inactivated influenza vaccines (IIVs) will be available in both trivalent (IIV3) and quadrivalent (IIV4) formulations. Vaccine virus strains included in the 2013–14 U.S. trivalent influenza vaccines will be an A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)–like virus, an H3N2 virus antigenically like the cell-propagated prototype virus A/Victoria/361/2011, and a B/Massachusetts/2/2012–like virus. Quadrivalent vaccines will include an additional influenza B virus strain, a B/Brisbane/60/2008–like virus, intended to ensure that both influenza B virus antigenic lineages (Victoria and Yamagata) are included in the vaccine. This report describes recently approved vaccines, including LAIV4, IIV4, trivalent cell culture-based inactivated influenza vaccine (ccIIV3), and trivalent recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV3). No preferential recommendation is made for one influenza vaccine product over another for persons for whom more than one product is otherwise appropriate. This information is intended for vaccination providers, immunization program personnel, and public health personnel. These recommendations and other information are available at CDC’s influenza website (http://www.cdc.gov/flu); any updates also will be found at this website. Vaccination and health-care providers should check the CDC influenza website periodically for additional information.

Information for First Responders on Maintaining Operational Capabilities during a Pandemic

October 2, 2013 Comments off

Information for First Responders on Maintaining Operational Capabilities during a Pandemic (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security

First responders have a critical role in prehospital emergency care and must continue to provide this essential service and fill the many emergency response roles in a community. The first responder community includes: fire, emergency medical services, law enforcement, emergency management, and 9-1-1 telecommunications.

During a severe pandemic, workloads will increase and staff sizes will diminish as employees and their families become ill. Contingency planning now can help reduce the worst impacts: smart planning can save lives.

To help with planning for the impacts of a severe pandemic, this document provides the following kinds of information for first responders:

• Potential ways to adjust operations to maintain readiness and response

• Potential ways for leaders in the first responder community at the local level, including two planning tools

• Reference sheets with discipline-specific potential action steps

This document was a joint effort by the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Health Affairs and U.S. Fire Administration with major contributions from a working group of first responders. It provides supplemental information to Pandemic Influenza: Best Practices and Model Protocols (April 2007) and to the FEMA IS-520 Introduction to COOP for Pandemic Influenza on-line course (August 2009).

While background information about pandemic influenza is also provided, updated influenza information should be gathered regularly. Current information about circulating influenza viruses, including important guidance, is provided by the Department of Health and Human Services at http://www.flu.gov. State and local public health organizations will have the most current information regarding the status of pandemic in your jurisdiction. Communication and coordination with these entities is an essential part of planning as well as actual operations. Better-protected first responders can better protect their communities. We hope this information contributes to a safer and healthier first responder workforce.

Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Health-Care Personnel — United States, 2012–13 Influenza Season

September 30, 2013 Comments off

Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Health-Care Personnel — United States, 2012–13 Influenza Season
Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (CDC)

Routine influenza vaccination of health-care personnel (HCP) every influenza season can reduce influenza-related illness and its potentially serious consequences among HCP and their patients (1–5). To protect HCP and their patients, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that all HCP be vaccinated against influenza during each influenza season (5). To estimate influenza vaccination coverage among HCP during the 2012–13 season, CDC conducted an opt-in Internet panel survey of 1,944 self-selected HCP during April 1–16, 2013. This report summarizes the results of that survey, which found that, overall, 72.0% of HCP reported having had an influenza vaccination for the 2012–13 season, an increase from 66.9% vaccination coverage during the 2011–12 season (6). By occupation type, coverage was 92.3% among physicians, 89.1% among pharmacists, 88.5% among nurse practitioners/physician assistants, and 84.8% among nurses. By occupational setting, vaccination coverage was highest among hospital-based HCP (83.1%) and was lowest among HCP at long-term care facilities (LTCF) (58.9%). Vaccination coverage was higher for HCP in occupational settings offering vaccination on-site at no cost for one (75.7%) or multiple (86.2%) days compared with HCP in occupational settings not offering vaccination on-site at no cost (55.3%). Widespread implementation of comprehensive influenza vaccination strategies that focus on improving access to vaccination services is needed to improve HCP vaccination coverage. Influenza vaccination of HCP in all health-care settings might be increased by providing 1) HCP with information on vaccination benefits and risks for themselves and their patients, 2) vaccinations in the workplace at convenient locations and times, and 3) influenza vaccinations at no cost (7,8).

Ischaemic heart disease, influenza and influenza vaccination: a prospective case control study

August 22, 2013 Comments off

Ischaemic heart disease, influenza and influenza vaccination: a prospective case control study
Source: Heart (BMJ)

Background
Abundant, indirect epidemiological evidence indicates that influenza contributes to all-cause mortality and cardiovascular hospitalisations with studies showing increases in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and death during the influenza season.

Objective
To investigate whether influenza is a significant and unrecognised underlying precipitant of AMI.

Design
Case-control study.

Setting
Tertiary referral hospital in Sydney, Australia, during 2008 to 2010.

Patients
Cases were inpatients with AMI and controls were outpatients without AMI at a hospital in Sydney, Australia.

Main outcome measures
Primary outcome was laboratory evidence of influenza. Secondary outcome was baseline self-reported acute respiratory tract infection.

Results
Of 559 participants, 34/275 (12.4%) cases and 19/284 (6.7%) controls had influenza (OR 1.97, 95% CI 1.09 to 3.54); half were vaccinated. None were recognised as having influenza during their clinical encounter. After adjustment, influenza infection was no longer a significant predictor of recent AMI. However, influenza vaccination was significantly protective (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.85), with a vaccine effectiveness of 45% (95% CI 15% to 65%).

Conclusions
Recent influenza infection was an unrecognised comorbidity in almost 10% of hospital patients. Influenza did not predict AMI, but vaccination was significantly protective but underused. The potential population health impact of influenza vaccination, particularly in the age group 50–64 years, who are at risk for AMI but not targeted for vaccination, should be further explored. Our data should inform vaccination policy and cardiologists should be aware of missed opportunities to vaccinate individuals with ischaemic heart disease against influenza.

See: Flu Shot May Halve Heart Attack Risk in Middle Aged With Narrowed Arteries (Science Daily)

H5N1: A Case Study for Dual-Use Research

July 17, 2013 Comments off

H5N1: A Case Study for Dual-Use Research
Source: Council on Foreign Relations

Gigi Gronvall examines the controversy surrounding the publication of two H5N1 flu–transmission studies as a case study to illuminate why dual-use research of concern is not just a problem for scientists. This paper clarifies the arguments that arose for and against publication, offers lessons learned regarding future dual-use research to scientists, research directors, publishers, and policymakers, and promotes a reasonable consideration of the risks and benefits of dual-use research.

Influenza Activity — United States, 2012–13 Season and Composition of the 2013–14 Influenza Vaccine

June 20, 2013 Comments off

Influenza Activity — United States, 2012–13 Season and Composition of the 2013–14 Influenza Vaccine

Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (CDC)

During the 2012–13 influenza season in the United States, influenza activity* increased through November and December before peaking in late December. Influenza A (H3N2) viruses predominated overall, but influenza B viruses and, to a lesser extent, influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 (pH1N1) viruses also were reported in the United States. This influenza season was moderately severe, with a higher percentage of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI), higher rates of hospitalization, and more reported deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza compared with recent years. This report summarizes influenza activity in the United States during the 2012–13 influenza season (September 30, 2012–May 18, 2013) as of June 7, 2013, and reports the recommendations for the components of the 2013–14 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccine.

Influenza Illness and Hospitalizations Averted by Influenza Vaccination in the United States, 2005–2011

June 20, 2013 Comments off

Influenza Illness and Hospitalizations Averted by Influenza Vaccination in the United States, 2005–2011
Source: PLoS ONE

Context

The goal of influenza vaccination programs is to reduce influenza-associated disease outcomes. Therefore, estimating the reduced burden of influenza as a result of vaccination over time and by age group would allow for a clear understanding of the value of influenza vaccines in the US, and of areas where improvements could lead to greatest benefits.

Objective

To estimate the direct effect of influenza vaccination in the US in terms of averted number of cases, medically-attended cases, and hospitalizations over six recent influenza seasons.

Design

Using existing surveillance data, we present a method for assessing the impact of influenza vaccination where impact is defined as either the number of averted outcomes or as the prevented disease fraction (the number of cases estimated to have been averted relative to the number of cases that would have occurred in the absence of vaccination).

Results

We estimated that during our 6-year study period, the number of influenza illnesses averted by vaccination ranged from a low of approximately 1.1 million (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.6–1.7 million) during the 2006–2007 season to a high of 5 million (CI 2.9–8.6 million) during the 2010–2011 season while the number of averted hospitalizations ranged from a low of 7,700 (CI 3,700–14,100) in 2009–2010 to a high of 40,400 (CI 20,800–73,000) in 2010–2011. Prevented fractions varied across age groups and over time. The highest prevented fraction in the study period was observed in 2010–2011, reflecting the post-pandemic expansion of vaccination coverage.

Conclusions

Influenza vaccination programs in the US produce a substantial health benefit in terms of averted cases, clinic visits and hospitalizations. Our results underscore the potential for additional disease prevention through increased vaccination coverage, particularly among nonelderly adults, and increased vaccine effectiveness, particularly among the elderly.

Categories: influenza, PLoS ONE, vaccines

Emergence of Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Causing Severe Human Illness — China, February–April 2013

May 28, 2013 Comments off

Emergence of Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Causing Severe Human Illness — China, February–April 2013

Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (CDC)

On March 29, 2013, the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention completed laboratory confirmation of three human infections with an avian influenza A(H7N9) virus not previously reported in humans (1). These infections were reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) on March 31, 2013, in accordance with International Health Regulations. The cases involved two adults in Shanghai and one in Anhui Province. All three patients had severe pneumonia, developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and died from their illness (2). The cases were not epidemiologically linked. The detection of these cases initiated a cascade of activities in China, including diagnostic test development, enhanced surveillance for new cases, and investigations to identify the source(s) of infection. No evidence of sustained human-to-human transmission has been found, and no human cases of H7N9 virus infection have been detected outside China, including the United States. This report summarizes recent findings and recommendations for preparing and responding to potential H7N9 cases in the United States. Clinicians should consider the diagnosis of avian influenza A(H7N9) virus infection in persons with acute respiratory illness and relevant exposure history and should contact their state health departments regarding specimen collection and facilitation of confirmatory testing.

Preliminary Report: Epidemiology of the Avian Influenza A (H7N9) Outbreak in China

April 25, 2013 Comments off

Preliminary Report: Epidemiology of the Avian Influenza A (H7N9) Outbreak in China
Source: New England Journal of Medicine

The first identified cases of human infection with a novel influenza A (H7N9) virus occurred in eastern China during February and March 2013 and were characterized by rapidly progressive pneumonia, respiratory failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and fatal outcomes.1 We analyzed available data from field investigations to characterize the descriptive epidemiology of laboratory-confirmed cases of avian influenza A (H7N9) virus infection in humans reported to the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC) as of April 17, 2013. In this report, we summarize the preliminary findings of case investigations and follow-up monitoring of close contacts of persons with confirmed cases of H7N9 virus infection who have been identified to date. This is an ongoing investigation.

New From the GAO

February 13, 2013 Comments off

New GAO Reports

Source: Government Accountability Office

INFLUENZA
Progress Made in Responding to Seasonal and Pandemic Outbreaks
GAO-13-374T, Feb 13, 2013

U.S. POSTAL SERVICE
Urgent Action Needed to Achieve Financial Sustainability
GAO-13-347T, Feb 13, 2013

VA HEALTH CARE
Reported Outpatient Medical Appointment Wait Times Are Unreliable
GAO-13-363T, Feb 13, 2013

CDC — Situation Update: Summary of Weekly FluView

January 11, 2013 Comments off

Situation Update: Summary of Weekly FluView

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The United States is having an early flu season with most of the country now experiencing high levels of influenza-like-illness (ILI). In this week’s FluView report, some key flu activity indicators continued to rise, while others fell. It’s too soon to say exactly what this means; but some regions may have peaked, while other parts of the country are still on the upswing. This FluView update contains data for the week between December 30, 2012 and January 5, 2013.

Below is a summary of the key indicators:

  • The proportion of people seeing their health care provider for influenza-like illness (ILI) decreased from 6.0% to 4.3% for the week ending in January 5, but remains above the national baseline for the fifth consecutive week.
  • Twenty-four states and New York City are now reporting high ILI activity. Last week 29 states reported high ILI activity. Additionally, 16 are reporting moderate levels of ILI activity; an increase from 9 states in the prior week. States reporting high ILI activity for the week ending January 5, 2013 include Alabama, Colorado, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, and West Virginia.
  • Forty-seven states reported widespread geographic influenza activity for the week between December 30, 2012 and January 5, 2013. This is an increase from 41 states in the previous week. Geographic Spread data are based on assessments made by each state health department and show how many areas within a state or territory are seeing flu activity. The assessments made by each state health department are based on the detection of outbreaks of flu, increases in the percent of people visiting the doctor with flu-like symptoms, and patients with laboratory-confirmed influenza.
  • Since October 1, 2012, 3,710 laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated hospitalizations have been reported; an increase of 1,443 hospitalizations from the previous week. This translates to a rate of 13.3 influenza-associated hospitalizations per 100,000 people in the United States.

The Compelling Need for Game-Changing Influenza Vaccines: An Analysis of the Influenza Vaccine Enterprise and Recommendations for the Future

December 11, 2012 Comments off

The Compelling Need for Game-Changing Influenza Vaccines: An Analysis of the Influenza Vaccine Enterprise and Recommendations for the Future (PDF)

Source: Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, University of Minnesota

Influenza vaccine was first recommended for use in US military personnel in 1945. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) thereafter made a number of incremental changes to the annual influenza vaccine recommendations, leading to recommended coverage for an ever-increasing proportion of the US population. In 2010 the ACIP recommended the first national universal seasonal influenza vaccination for all persons 6 months old and older. With the vast majority of Americans now recommended for vaccination, the public health benefits of the current influenza vaccination strategy have largely been maximized.

Current hemagglutinin (HA)-head antigen influenza vaccines, regardless of the platform in which they are manufactured, are inadequate to provide robust clinical protection across multiple strains or long-term protection. Evidence for consistent high-level protection is elusive for the present generation of vaccines, especially in individuals at risk of medical complications or those 65 years old or older. The ongoing public health burden caused by seasonal influenza and the potential global effect of a severe pandemic create an urgent need for a new generation of highly effective and cross-protective vaccines that can be manufactured rapidly. A universal vaccine should be the goal, with a novel-antigen game-changing vaccine the minimum requirement.

Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Health-Care Personnel — 2011–12 Influenza Season, United States

September 28, 2012 Comments off

Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Health-Care Personnel — 2011–12 Influenza Season, United States

Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (CDC)

Influenza vaccination of health-care personnel (HCP) is recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) (1). Vaccination of HCP can reduce morbidity and mortality from influenza and its potentially serious consequences among HCP, their family members, and their patients (1–3). To provide timely estimates of influenza vaccination coverage and related data among HCP for the 2011–12 influenza season, CDC conducted an Internet panel survey with 2,348 HCP during April 2–20, 2012. This report summarizes the results of that survey, which found that, overall, 66.9% of HCP reported having had an influenza vaccination for the 2011–12 season. By occupation, vaccination coverage was 85.6% among physicians, 77.9% among nurses, and 62.8% among all other HCP participating in the survey. Vaccination coverage was 76.9% among HCP working in hospitals, 67.7% among those in physician offices, and 52.4% among those in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Among HCP working in hospitals that required influenza vaccination, coverage was 95.2%; among HCP in hospitals not requiring vaccination, coverage was 68.2%. Widespread implementation of comprehensive HCP influenza vaccination strategies is needed, particularly among those who are not physicians or nurses and who work in LTCFs, to increase HCP vaccination coverage and minimize the risk for medical-care–acquired influenza illnesses.

See also: Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Pregnant Women — 2011–12 Influenza Season, United States

Prevention and Control of Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Pra ctices (ACIP) — United States, 2012–13 Influenza Season

August 16, 2012 Comments off

Prevention and Control of Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) — United States, 2012–13 Influenza Season

Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (CDC)

In 2010, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) first recommended annual influenza vaccination for all persons aged ≥6 months in the United States (1). Annual influenza vaccination of all persons aged ≥6 months continues to be recommended. This document 1) describes influenza vaccine virus strains included in the U.S. seasonal influenza vaccine for 2012–13; 2) provides guidance for the use of influenza vaccines during the 2012–13 season, including an updated vaccination schedule for children aged 6 months through 8 years and a description of available vaccine products and indications; 3) discusses febrile seizures associated with administration of influenza and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate (PCV-13) vaccines; 4) provides vaccination recommendations for persons with a history of egg allergy; and 5) discusses the development of quadrivalent influenza vaccines for use in future influenza seasons. Information regarding issues related to influenza vaccination that are not addressed in this update is available in CDC’s Prevention and Control of Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), 2010 and associated updates (1,2).

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 893 other followers