Archive

Archive for the ‘safety’ Category

Using Innovation and Technology to Improve City Services

July 3, 2015 Comments off

Using Innovation and Technology to Improve City Services
Source: IBM Center for the Business of Government

In this report, Professor Greenberg examines a dozen cities across the United States that have award-winning reputations for using innovation and technology to improve the services they provide to their residents. She explores a variety of success factors associated with effective service delivery at the local level, including:

  • The policies, platforms, and applications that cities use for different purposes, such as public engagement, streamlining the issuance of permits, and emergency response
  • How cities can successfully partner with third parties, such as nonprofits, foundations, universities, and private businesses to improve service delivery using technology
  • The types of business cases that can be presented to mayors and city councils to support various changes proposed by innovators in city government

Professor Greenberg identifies a series of trends that drive cities to undertake innovations, such as the increased use of mobile devices by residents. Based on cities’ responses to these trends, she offers a set of findings and specific actions that city officials can act upon to create innovation agendas for their communities. Her report also presents case studies for each of the dozen cities in her review. These cases provide a real-world context, which will allow interested leaders in other cities to see how their own communities might approach similar innovation initiatives.

Law Enforcement Assessment of the Violent Extremism Threat

June 30, 2015 Comments off

Law Enforcement Assessment of the Violent Extremism Threat (PDF)
Source: Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security (Duke University/University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill)

Key Findings & Methods:

  • Law enforcement agencies in the United States consider anti-government violent extremists, not radicalized Muslims, to be the most severe threat of political violence that they face.
  • They perceive violent extremism to be a much more severe threat nationally than the threat of violent extremism in their own jurisdictions.
  • And a large majority of law enforcement agencies rank the threat of all forms of violent extremism in their own jurisdictions as moderate or lower (3 or less on a 1-5 scale).
  • These findings emerge from a survey we conducted with the Police Executive Research Forum in 2014, with funding from the National Institute of Justice. The sampling frame was all 480 state, county, and municipal law enforcement agencies with more than 200 sworn officers, plus 63 additional county and municipal agencies with 200 or fewer sworn officers in selected jurisdictions that experienced an incident or prosecution for violent extremism in recent years. The survey yielded responses from 339 of the larger agencies (a 71 percent response rate) and 43 of the smaller agencies (a 68 percent response rate), for a total of 382 law enforcement agencies (a 70 percent response rate), including 35 state agencies, 141 county agencies, and 206 municipal agencies, whose combined jurisdictions cover 86 percent of the U.S. population.

A look at violence in the workplace against psychiatric aides and psychiatric technicians

June 23, 2015 Comments off

A look at violence in the workplace against psychiatric aides and psychiatric technicians
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Psychiatric aides and technicians are experiencing high rates of nonfatal occupational injury and illness due to violence in the workplace by patients. For psychiatric aides, the rate is 69 times higher than the national rate of violence in the workplace, and for psychiatric technicians it is 38 times higher. The rates for these two occupations were different from each other even though psychiatric aides and technicians have similar job environments and duties. This article analyzes the similarities and differences of these occupations, gives a brief overview of psychiatric practices in the United States, and looks at areas where more research could be conducted to help prevent future injuries and illnesses for people in these occupations.

Efficacy of a Sexual Assault Resistance Program for University Women

June 11, 2015 Comments off

Efficacy of a Sexual Assault Resistance Program for University Women
Source: New England Journal of Medicine

In this randomized, controlled trial, the risk of completed rape (the primary outcome) was significantly lower over a period of 1 year among first-year university women who participated in a sexual assault resistance program than among those who were provided access to brochures on sexual assault. These results contrast with previous reports of the limited effectiveness of other interventions for women.17-21 An early version of one program reduced the risk of completed rape after 9 weeks of follow-up only among women with no history of victimization.17 In three of four subsequent studies assessing modified programs, there was no significant reduction in the risk of completed rape; in the fourth, the risk of completed rape was reduced but not beyond 2 months after the intervention.18-21 The primary differences between the previous interventions and our resistance program are that ours had more hours of programming, a greater number of interactive and practice exercises, less focus on “assertive communication” and more on escalation of resistance in response to a perpetrator’s perseverance, and the addition of positive sexuality content (Unit 4).22 Further research is warranted to identify the elements that are critical for efficacy so that a shorter version of the resistance program can be developed that will encourage wider implementation.

See also: A Comprehensive Approach to Sexual Violence Prevention (editorial)

CA — Health Product Risk Communication: Is the Message Getting Through?

June 11, 2015 Comments off

Health Product Risk Communication: Is the Message Getting Through?
Source: Council of Canadian Academies

Health Product Risk Communication: Is the Message Getting Through? synthesizes the available evidence on risk communication, health product risk communication tools, evaluation methods, and barriers and facilitators to effective communication and successful evaluation activities. It is intended primarily as a tool to inform evaluation and decision-making within government departments and agencies responsible for risk communication and interested in improving their efforts. The report may also be of interest to Canadians as they seek to remain informed about how to best communicate, interpret, and understand the risks associated with health products.

Ultimately, evaluation is essential to determine if health product risk communications are effective. Without adequate evaluation, not only is there potential for mistakes, but there is also the risk of missing opportunities to continue or build on proven successes.

Key Findings

  • Recognition of the importance of dialogue and ongoing relationships is prompting a paradigm shift for risk communication.
  • Regulators around the world use similar health product risk communication tools that are not systematically evaluated.
  • Evaluation is an integral part of risk communication and can be supported with institutional commitment and sufficient resources.
  • Careful planning determines relevant evaluation questions, which guide evaluation methods.

Almost 15 Years after the September 11th Terrorist Attacks, DHS Still Has Not Achieved Interoperable Communications

June 10, 2015 Comments off

Almost 15 Years after the September 11th Terrorist Attacks, DHS Still Has Not Achieved Interoperable Communications (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of Inspector General

In November 2012, the Department of Homeland Security Office of Inspector General (DHS OIG) published an audit, DHS’ Oversight of Interoperable Communications (OIG-13-06), concluding that DHS components could not talk to each other in the event of a terrorist event or other emergency. The DHS OIG has just completed a verification review and concluded that, two and a half years later, DHS components’ inability to communicate with each other persists.

+ Full Report (PDF)

DHS OIG — TSA Can Improve Aviation Worker Vetting (Redacted)

June 9, 2015 Comments off

TSA Can Improve Aviation Worker Vetting (Redacted) (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of Inspector General

Why We Did This
We conducted this review to identify enhancements to the Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) vetting of workers with access to secure areas of commercial airports for links to terrorism, criminal history, and lawful status. We also assessed the accuracy and reliability of data TSA uses for vetting.

Why We Did This
We conducted this review to identify enhancements to the Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) vetting of workers with access to secure areas of commercial airports for links to terrorism, criminal history, and lawful status. We also assessed the accuracy and reliability of data TSA uses for vetting.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,049 other followers