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Jails In Indian Country, 2013

August 25, 2014 Comments off

Jails In Indian Country, 2013
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents findings from the 2013 Survey of Jails in Indian Country, an enumeration of 79 jails, confinement facilities, detention centers, and other correctional facilities operated by tribal authorities or the Bureau of Indian Affairs. This report examines the trends from 2000 to 2013 in the number of adults and juveniles held, type of offense, number of persons confined on the last weekday in June, peak population, average daily population, admissions in June, and expected average length of stay in jail at admission. It also provides data on rated capacity, facility crowding, and jail staffing in June 2013. In addition, it provides counts of inmate deaths and suicide attempts for the 12-month period ending June 30, 2013 and compares to counts in prior years.

Highlights:

  • At midyear 2013, a total of 2,287 inmates were confined in Indian country jails—a 3.3% decrease from the 2,364 inmates confined at midyear 2012.
  • The number of inmates admitted into Indian country jails during June 2013 (10,977) was five times the size of the average daily population (2,141).
  • Since 2010, about 31% of inmates in Indian country jails have been confined for a violent offense, a decline from about 39% in each year between midyear 2004 and 2009.
  • Domestic violence (15%) and aggravated or simple assault (10%) accounted for the largest percentage of violent offenders at midyear 2013, followed by unspecified violence (5%) and rape or sexual assault (2%).
  • Nearly 2 in 10 inmates were held for public intoxication at midyear 2013.
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State Government Indigent Defense Expenditures, FY 2008–2012

July 21, 2014 Comments off

State Government Indigent Defense Expenditures, FY 2008–2012
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Provides data on state government indigent defense expenditures for fiscal years 2008 through 2012. Trends in spending and comparisons with total state government judicial-legal expenditures are also included. The report uses administrative data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Government Finance Survey. This is a companion report to the Census Bureau’s report, Indigent Defense Services in the United States, FY 2008-2012.

Highlights:

  • In 2012, state governments spent $2.2 billion nationally on indigent defense, the lowest amount spent during the 5-year period from 2008 to 2012.
  • State government indigent defense expenditures showed an average annual decrease of 1.1% from 2008 to 2012.
  • From 2011 to 2012, state government indigent defense expenditures decreased by $45 million nationally (down 2.0%).
  • As a share of total judicial-legal expenditures by state governments, spending on indigent defense held steady between 9.5% and 10.0% from 2008 to 2012.

Seasonal Patterns In Criminal Victimization Trends

June 23, 2014 Comments off

Seasonal Patterns In Criminal Victimization Trends
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Uses data from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) to examine the seasonal patterns in violent and property crime victimization in the United States from 1993 to 2010. Seasonal patterns are periodic fluctuations in the victimization rates that tend to occur at the same time each year. The report describes seasonal patterns in property crime (burglary, motor vehicle theft, and other household theft) and violent victimization (rape and sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault). It also presents seasonal trends in other forms of violence, including intimate partner violence, victimizations involving a weapon, and violence resulting in injury.

Highlights:

  • Seasonal patterns existed in household larceny and burglary victimization rates. Rates of these household crimes tended to be higher in the summer than during other seasons of the year.
  • When seasonal variations in household property victimization were found, the differences between the highest and lowest seasonal rates were less than 11%.
  • Though rates of motor vehicle theft tended to be lower in the spring than in the summer, there were few regular differences between summer, fall, and winter rates.
  • Aggravated assault rates were higher during the summer than during the winter, spring, and fall. In comparison, simple assault rates were higher during the fall than during other seasons of the year.
  • When seasonal variations were found for violent victimization, the differences between the rates of the highest and lowest seasons were less than 12%.

Recidivism Of Prisoners Released In 30 States In 2005: Patterns From 2005 To 2010

April 28, 2014 Comments off

Recidivism Of Prisoners Released In 30 States In 2005: Patterns From 2005 To 2010
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Examines the 5-year post-release offending patterns of persons released from state prisons in 2005 by offender characteristics, prior criminal history, and commitment offense. It provides estimates on the number and types of crimes former inmates commit both prior to their imprisonment and after release. The report includes different measures of recidivism, including a new arrest, court adjudication, conviction, and incarceration for either a new sentence or a technical violation. It also documents the extent to which the released prisoners committed crimes in states other than the one that released them. Data are from the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ Recidivism Study of State Prisoners Released in 2005, which tracked a sample of former inmates from 30 states for five years following release in 2005. The findings are based on prisoner records obtained from the state departments of corrections through the National Corrections Reporting Program (NCRP) and criminal history records obtained through requests to the FBI’s Interstate Identification Index (III) and state repositories via the International Justice and Public Safety Network (Nlets).

Highlights:

Among state prisoners released in 30 states in 2005—

  • About two-thirds (67.8%) of released prisoners were arrested for a new crime within 3 years, and three-quarters (76.6%) were arrested within 5 years.
  • Within 5 years of release, 82.1% of property offenders were arrested for a new crime, compared to 76.9% of drug offenders, 73.6% of public order offenders, and 71.3% of violent offenders.
  • More than a third (36.8%) of all prisoners who were arrested within 5 years of release were arrested within the first 6 months after release, with more than half (56.7%) arrested by the end of the first year.
  • Two in five (42.3%) released prisoners were either not arrested or arrested once in the 5 years after their release.
  • A sixth (16.1%) of released prisoners were responsible for almost half (48.4%) of the nearly 1.2 million arrests that occurred in the 5-year follow-up period.
  • An estimated 10.9% of released prisoners were arrested in a state other than the one that released them during the 5-year follow-up period
  • Within 5 years of release, 84.1% of inmates who were age 24 or younger at release were arrested, compared to 78.6% of inmates ages 25 to 39 and 69.2% of those age 40 or older.

Nonfatal Domestic Violence, 2003–2012

April 24, 2014 Comments off

Nonfatal Domestic Violence, 2003–2012
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents estimates on nonfatal domestic violence from 2003 to 2012. Domestic violence includes victimization committed by current or former intimate partners (spouses, boyfriends or girlfriends), parents, children, siblings, and other relatives. This report focuses on the level and pattern of domestic violence over time, highlighting selected victim and incident characteristics. Incident characteristics include the type of violence, the offender’s use of a weapon, victim injury and medical treatment, and whether the incident was reported to police. The report provides estimates of acquaintance and stranger violence for comparison. Data are from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), which collects information on nonfatal crimes reported and not reported to police. The NCVS is a self-report survey administered every six months to persons age 12 or older from a nationally representative sample of U.S. households.

Highlights:

  • In 2003–12, domestic violence accounted for 21% of all violent crime.
  • A greater percentage of domestic violence was committed by intimate partners (15%) than immediate family members (4%) or other relatives (2%).
  • Current or former boyfriends or girlfriends committed most domestic violence.
  • Females (76%) experienced more domestic violence victimizations than males (24%).

Crime Against Persons With Disabilities, 2009–2012 – Statistical Tables

February 27, 2014 Comments off

Crime Against Persons With Disabilities, 2009–2012 – Statistical Tables
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents estimates of nonfatal violent victimization (rape, sexual assault, robbery, aggravated and simple assault) against persons age 12 or older with disabilities from 2009 to 2012. Findings are based on the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). The report compares the victimization of persons with and without disabilities living in noninstitutionalized households, including distributions by age, race, sex, victims’ types of disabilities, and other victim characteristics. Data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (ACS) and the 2000 U.S. Standard Population were used to estimate age-adjusted victimization rates.

Highlights:

  • Persons age 12 or older who had disabilities experienced 1.3 million nonfatal violent crimes in 2012.
  • In 2012, the age-adjusted rate of violent victimization for persons with disabilities (60 per 1,000 persons with disabilities) was nearly three times the rate among persons without disabilities (22 per 1,000 persons without disabilities).
  • In 2012, the age-adjusted rate of violent victimization was higher for persons with disabilities than for those without disabilities for both males and females.
  • For each racial group measured, persons with disabilities had higher age-adjusted violent victimization rates than persons without disabilities in 2012.
  • In 2012, 52% of nonfatal violent crime against persons with disabilities involved victims who had multiple disability types.

Survey of State Criminal History Information Systems, 2012

February 14, 2014 Comments off

Survey of State Criminal History Information Systems, 2012 (PDF)
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

This is the twelfth survey of criminal history information systems conducted by SEARCH, The National Consortium for Justice Information and Statistics, since 1989. Some of the tables include data from previous surveys. Caution should be used in drawing comparisons between the results of earlier surveys and the data reported here. Over the course of the survey years, the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), has continued to administer assistance programs dedicated to improving criminal history records. As a result, some states focused new or additional resources on the condition of their records and, in many cases, know more about their records today than in the past. Similarly, expansion, advancement, and adoption of technology have also made a beneficial impact. Some state repositories, however, have suffered fiscal cutbacks and consequently have had to shift priorities away from certain criminal history information management tasks. For these and other reasons, trend comparisons may not as accurately reflect the status of each state’s criminal history records as the current data considered alone.

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