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State Government Indigent Defense Expenditures, FY 2008–2012

July 21, 2014 Comments off

State Government Indigent Defense Expenditures, FY 2008–2012
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Provides data on state government indigent defense expenditures for fiscal years 2008 through 2012. Trends in spending and comparisons with total state government judicial-legal expenditures are also included. The report uses administrative data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Government Finance Survey. This is a companion report to the Census Bureau’s report, Indigent Defense Services in the United States, FY 2008-2012.

Highlights:

  • In 2012, state governments spent $2.2 billion nationally on indigent defense, the lowest amount spent during the 5-year period from 2008 to 2012.
  • State government indigent defense expenditures showed an average annual decrease of 1.1% from 2008 to 2012.
  • From 2011 to 2012, state government indigent defense expenditures decreased by $45 million nationally (down 2.0%).
  • As a share of total judicial-legal expenditures by state governments, spending on indigent defense held steady between 9.5% and 10.0% from 2008 to 2012.
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Seasonal Patterns In Criminal Victimization Trends

June 23, 2014 Comments off

Seasonal Patterns In Criminal Victimization Trends
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Uses data from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) to examine the seasonal patterns in violent and property crime victimization in the United States from 1993 to 2010. Seasonal patterns are periodic fluctuations in the victimization rates that tend to occur at the same time each year. The report describes seasonal patterns in property crime (burglary, motor vehicle theft, and other household theft) and violent victimization (rape and sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault). It also presents seasonal trends in other forms of violence, including intimate partner violence, victimizations involving a weapon, and violence resulting in injury.

Highlights:

  • Seasonal patterns existed in household larceny and burglary victimization rates. Rates of these household crimes tended to be higher in the summer than during other seasons of the year.
  • When seasonal variations in household property victimization were found, the differences between the highest and lowest seasonal rates were less than 11%.
  • Though rates of motor vehicle theft tended to be lower in the spring than in the summer, there were few regular differences between summer, fall, and winter rates.
  • Aggravated assault rates were higher during the summer than during the winter, spring, and fall. In comparison, simple assault rates were higher during the fall than during other seasons of the year.
  • When seasonal variations were found for violent victimization, the differences between the rates of the highest and lowest seasons were less than 12%.

Recidivism Of Prisoners Released In 30 States In 2005: Patterns From 2005 To 2010

April 28, 2014 Comments off

Recidivism Of Prisoners Released In 30 States In 2005: Patterns From 2005 To 2010
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Examines the 5-year post-release offending patterns of persons released from state prisons in 2005 by offender characteristics, prior criminal history, and commitment offense. It provides estimates on the number and types of crimes former inmates commit both prior to their imprisonment and after release. The report includes different measures of recidivism, including a new arrest, court adjudication, conviction, and incarceration for either a new sentence or a technical violation. It also documents the extent to which the released prisoners committed crimes in states other than the one that released them. Data are from the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ Recidivism Study of State Prisoners Released in 2005, which tracked a sample of former inmates from 30 states for five years following release in 2005. The findings are based on prisoner records obtained from the state departments of corrections through the National Corrections Reporting Program (NCRP) and criminal history records obtained through requests to the FBI’s Interstate Identification Index (III) and state repositories via the International Justice and Public Safety Network (Nlets).

Highlights:

Among state prisoners released in 30 states in 2005—

  • About two-thirds (67.8%) of released prisoners were arrested for a new crime within 3 years, and three-quarters (76.6%) were arrested within 5 years.
  • Within 5 years of release, 82.1% of property offenders were arrested for a new crime, compared to 76.9% of drug offenders, 73.6% of public order offenders, and 71.3% of violent offenders.
  • More than a third (36.8%) of all prisoners who were arrested within 5 years of release were arrested within the first 6 months after release, with more than half (56.7%) arrested by the end of the first year.
  • Two in five (42.3%) released prisoners were either not arrested or arrested once in the 5 years after their release.
  • A sixth (16.1%) of released prisoners were responsible for almost half (48.4%) of the nearly 1.2 million arrests that occurred in the 5-year follow-up period.
  • An estimated 10.9% of released prisoners were arrested in a state other than the one that released them during the 5-year follow-up period
  • Within 5 years of release, 84.1% of inmates who were age 24 or younger at release were arrested, compared to 78.6% of inmates ages 25 to 39 and 69.2% of those age 40 or older.

Nonfatal Domestic Violence, 2003–2012

April 24, 2014 Comments off

Nonfatal Domestic Violence, 2003–2012
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents estimates on nonfatal domestic violence from 2003 to 2012. Domestic violence includes victimization committed by current or former intimate partners (spouses, boyfriends or girlfriends), parents, children, siblings, and other relatives. This report focuses on the level and pattern of domestic violence over time, highlighting selected victim and incident characteristics. Incident characteristics include the type of violence, the offender’s use of a weapon, victim injury and medical treatment, and whether the incident was reported to police. The report provides estimates of acquaintance and stranger violence for comparison. Data are from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), which collects information on nonfatal crimes reported and not reported to police. The NCVS is a self-report survey administered every six months to persons age 12 or older from a nationally representative sample of U.S. households.

Highlights:

  • In 2003–12, domestic violence accounted for 21% of all violent crime.
  • A greater percentage of domestic violence was committed by intimate partners (15%) than immediate family members (4%) or other relatives (2%).
  • Current or former boyfriends or girlfriends committed most domestic violence.
  • Females (76%) experienced more domestic violence victimizations than males (24%).

Crime Against Persons With Disabilities, 2009–2012 – Statistical Tables

February 27, 2014 Comments off

Crime Against Persons With Disabilities, 2009–2012 – Statistical Tables
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents estimates of nonfatal violent victimization (rape, sexual assault, robbery, aggravated and simple assault) against persons age 12 or older with disabilities from 2009 to 2012. Findings are based on the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). The report compares the victimization of persons with and without disabilities living in noninstitutionalized households, including distributions by age, race, sex, victims’ types of disabilities, and other victim characteristics. Data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (ACS) and the 2000 U.S. Standard Population were used to estimate age-adjusted victimization rates.

Highlights:

  • Persons age 12 or older who had disabilities experienced 1.3 million nonfatal violent crimes in 2012.
  • In 2012, the age-adjusted rate of violent victimization for persons with disabilities (60 per 1,000 persons with disabilities) was nearly three times the rate among persons without disabilities (22 per 1,000 persons without disabilities).
  • In 2012, the age-adjusted rate of violent victimization was higher for persons with disabilities than for those without disabilities for both males and females.
  • For each racial group measured, persons with disabilities had higher age-adjusted violent victimization rates than persons without disabilities in 2012.
  • In 2012, 52% of nonfatal violent crime against persons with disabilities involved victims who had multiple disability types.

Survey of State Criminal History Information Systems, 2012

February 14, 2014 Comments off

Survey of State Criminal History Information Systems, 2012 (PDF)
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

This is the twelfth survey of criminal history information systems conducted by SEARCH, The National Consortium for Justice Information and Statistics, since 1989. Some of the tables include data from previous surveys. Caution should be used in drawing comparisons between the results of earlier surveys and the data reported here. Over the course of the survey years, the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), has continued to administer assistance programs dedicated to improving criminal history records. As a result, some states focused new or additional resources on the condition of their records and, in many cases, know more about their records today than in the past. Similarly, expansion, advancement, and adoption of technology have also made a beneficial impact. Some state repositories, however, have suffered fiscal cutbacks and consequently have had to shift priorities away from certain criminal history information management tasks. For these and other reasons, trend comparisons may not as accurately reflect the status of each state’s criminal history records as the current data considered alone.

Survey of Sexual Violence in Adult Correctional Facilities, 2009–11 – Statistical Tables

January 27, 2014 Comments off

Survey of Sexual Violence in Adult Correctional Facilities, 2009–11 – Statistical Tables
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents jurisdiction- and facility-level counts of allegations and substantiated incidents of nonconsensual sexual acts, abusive sexual contacts, staff sexual misconduct, and staff sexual harassment reported by correctional authorities in adult prisons, jails, and other correctional facilities in 2009, 2010, and 2011. Facilities include the Federal Bureau of Prisons, state prison systems, facilities operated by the U.S. military and Immigration and Customs Enforcement, sampled jail jurisdictions, privately operated jails and prisons, and jails in Indian country. These tables accompany Sexual Victimization Reported by Adult Correctional Authorities, 2009–11, which provides national estimates and rates of sexual victimization as well as an in-depth examination of substantiated incidents, covering the number and characteristics of victims and perpetrators, location, time of day, nature of the injuries, impact on the victims, and sanctions imposed on the perpetrators. Data are from the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ Survey of Sexual Violence (SSV), which has annually collected official records on allegations and substantiated incidents of inmate-on-inmate and staff-on-inmate sexual victimization since 2004.

Local Government Corrections Expenditures, FY 2005-2011

January 15, 2014 Comments off

Local Government Corrections Expenditures, FY 2005-2011
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents data on local government corrections expenditures from fiscal years 2005 to 2011. This report examines trends in local government spending to build and operate correctional institutions and spending for other corrections functions such as probation. It compares trends in local government spending on corrections with trends in local spending on police protection, judicial-legal services, public welfare, education, health and hospitals, and highways. It also compares state and local expenditures on correctional institutions. Data are from the Census Bureau’s State and Local Government Finance Survey, which collects information on state and local expenditures and revenues.

Homicide In The U.S. Known To Law Enforcement, 2011

January 6, 2014 Comments off

Homicide In The U.S. Known To Law Enforcement, 2011
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents data on homicide trends from 1992 to 2011. The report describes homicide patterns and trends by age, sex, and race of the victim. It explores weapon use, with a focus on trends in firearm use and homicide trends by city size. It also includes special discussions of missing offender data and firearm use in nonfatal violent victimizations. The data are from the FBI’s Supplementary Homicide Reports, with summary data from Crime in the United States, for homicide data prior to 1980. Data on nonfatal victimizations are from BJS’s National Crime Victimization Survey, 1993 to 1995 and 2008 to 2011.

Victims of Identity Theft, 2012

December 16, 2013 Comments off

Victims of Identity Theft, 2012
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents findings on the prevalence and nature of identity theft from the 2012 Identity Theft Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey. Identity theft is defined as the unauthorized use or attempted use of existing accounts, or the unauthorized use or attempted use of personal information to open a new account or for other fraudulent purposes. The report details the number and percentage of persons age 16 or older who reported at least one incident of identity theft over the past year. It describes how the personal information was obtained, financial losses due to identity theft, victim reporting to credit bureaus and police, and the impact of identity theft on victims’ lives. The report also presents a lifetime prevalence rate for identity theft and information on the preventative actions taken to avoid becoming a victim of identity theft.

Highlights:

  • About 7% of persons age 16 or older were victims of identity theft in 2012.
  • The majority of identity theft incidents (85%) involved the fraudulent use of existing account information, such as credit card or bank account information.
  • Victims who had personal information used to open a new account or for other fraudulent purposes were more likely than victims of existing account fraud to experience financial, credit, and relationship problems and severe emotional distress.
  • About 14% of identity theft victims experienced out-of-pocket losses of $1 or more. Of these victims, about half suffered losses of less than $100.„„
  • Over half of identity theft victims who were able to resolve any associated problems did so in a day or less; among victims who had personal information used for fraudulent purposes, 29% spent a month or more resolving problems.

State Court Organization, 2011

December 16, 2013 Comments off

State Court Organization, 2011
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents 2011 data on the organization and operations of state trial and appellate courts and examines trends from 1980 through 2011. Topics include court structure, distribution of judges by jurisdictional level, and staffing, selection, and educational requirements of judges. Other topics include the responsibilities of administrative offices of courts, court funding sources, and verdict requirements. The appendix tables provide detailed state-level data on trial court administrators, trial court clerks, and the provisions for judicial education. Data are from the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ State Court Organization (SCO) collections.

Highlights:

  • The organizational structure of the nation’s trial and appellate courts changed modestly from 1980 to 2011.
  • Six states added intermediate appellate courts between 1980 and 1998: Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, Utah, and Virginia.
  • From 1980 to 2011, the number of states with more than three types of limited jurisdiction trial courts declined from 31 to 21.
  • The number of states with one or no limited jurisdiction trial courts increased from 14 in 1980 to 21 in 2011.
  • From 1980 to 2011, the number of state appellate court judges increased 69%, and the number of state trial judges increased 11%.

Intimate Partner Violence: Attributes Of Victimization, 1993–2011

December 11, 2013 Comments off

Intimate Partner Violence: Attributes Of Victimization, 1993–2011
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents data on trends in nonfatal intimate partner violence among U.S. households from 1993 to 2011. Intimate partner violence includes rape, sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault by a current or former spouse, boyfriend, or girlfriend. This report focuses on attributes of the victimization such as the type of crime, type of attack, whether the victim was threatened before the attack, use of a weapon by the offender, victim injury, and medical treatment received for injuries. The report also describes ways these attributes of the victimization may be used to measure seriousness or severity of the incident. Data are from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), which collects information on nonfatal crimes reported and not reported to the police. The NCVS is a self-report survey administered every six months to persons age 12 or older from a nationally representative sample of U.S. households.

Highlights:

  • From 1994 to 2011, the rate of serious intimate partner violence declined 72% for females and 64% for males. „„
  • Nonfatal serious violence comprised more than a third of intimate partner violence against females and males during the most recent 10-year period (2002–11). „„
  • An estimated two-thirds of female and male intimate partner victimizations involved a physical attack in 2002–11; the remaining third involved an attempted attack or verbal threat of harm. „„
  • In 2002–11, 8% of female intimate partner victimizations involved some form of sexual violence during the incident. „„
  • About 4% of females and 8% of males who were victimized by an intimate partner were shot at, stabbed, or hit with a weapon in 2002–11.

State Court Organization, 2011

December 3, 2013 Comments off

State Court Organization, 2011
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents 2011 data on the organization and operations of state trial and appellate courts and examines trends from 1980 through 2011. Topics include court structure, distribution of judges by jurisdictional level, and staffing, selection, and educational requirements of judges. Other topics include the responsibilities of administrative offices of courts, court funding sources, and verdict requirements. The appendix tables provide detailed state-level data on trial court administrators, trial court clerks, and the provisions for judicial education. Data are from the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ State Court Organization (SCO) collections.

Highlights:

  • The organizational structure of the nation’s trial and appellate courts changed modestly from 1980 to 2011.
  • Six states added intermediate appellate courts between 1980 and 1998: Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, Utah, and Virginia.
  • From 1980 to 2011, the number of states with more than three types of limited jurisdiction trial courts declined from 31 to 21.
  • The number of states with one or no limited jurisdiction trial courts increased from 14 in 1980 to 21 in 2011.
  • From 1980 to 2011, the number of state appellate court judges increased 69%, and the number of state trial judges increased 11%.

Intimate Partner Violence: Attributes of Victimization, 1993–2011

November 28, 2013 Comments off

Intimate Partner Violence: Attributes of Victimization, 1993–2011
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents data on trends in nonfatal intimate partner violence among U.S. households from 1993 to 2011. Intimate partner violence includes rape, sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault by a current or former spouse, boyfriend, or girlfriend. This report focuses on attributes of the victimization such as the type of crime, type of attack, whether the victim was threatened before the attack, use of a weapon by the offender, victim injury, and medical treatment received for injuries. The report also describes ways these attributes of the victimization may be used to measure seriousness or severity of the incident. Data are from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), which collects information on nonfatal crimes reported and not reported to the police. The NCVS is a self-report survey administered every six months to persons age 12 or older from a nationally representative sample of U.S. households.

Highlights:

  • From 1994 to 2011, the rate of serious intimate partner violence declined 72% for females and 64% for males. „„
  • Nonfatal serious violence comprised more than a third of intimate partner violence against females and males during the most recent 10-year period (2002–11). „„
  • An estimated two-thirds of female and male intimate partner victimizations involved a physical attack in 2002–11; the remaining third involved an attempted attack or verbal threat of harm. „„
  • In 2002–11, 8% of female intimate partner victimizations involved some form of sexual violence during the incident. „„
    About 4% of females and 8% of males who were victimized by an intimate partner were shot at, stabbed, or hit with a weapon in 2002–11.

Criminal Victimization, 2012

October 29, 2013 Comments off

Criminal Victimization, 2012
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents 2012 estimates of rates and levels of criminal victimization in the United States. This bulletin includes violent victimization (rape or sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault) and property victimization (burglary, motor vehicle theft, and property theft). It describes the annual change from 2011 and analyzes 10-year trends from 2003 through 2012. The bulletin includes estimates of domestic violence, intimate partner violence, and injury and use of weapons in violent victimization. It also describes the characteristics of victims. The National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) collects information on nonfatal crimes, reported and not reported to the police, against persons age 12 or older from a nationally representative sample of U.S. households. During 2012, about 92,390 households and 162,940 persons were interviewed for the NCVS.

Requests for Police Assistance, 2011

October 2, 2013 Comments off

Requests for Police Assistance, 2011
Source: Bureau of Justice Assistance

Examines the characteristics and experiences of persons age 16 or older who contacted police to request assistance in 2011. The report describes the perceptions of residents about police behavior and response during these encounters. It details requests for police assistance to (1) report a crime, suspicious activity, or neighborhood disturbance; (2) report a noncrime emergency, such as a medical issue or traffic accident; and (3) seek help for a nonemergency or other reason, such as asking for directions or help with an animal problem. Data are from the 2011 Police-Public Contact Survey (PPCS), a supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey, which collects information from a nationally representative sample of persons in U.S. households on contact with police during a 12-month period.

Highlights:

  • An estimated 1 in 8 U.S. residents age 16 or older, or 31.4 million persons, requested assistance from police at least once, most commonly to report a crime, suspicious activity, or neighborhood disturbance.
  • About 85% of persons who requested police assistance were satisfied with the police response.
  • No statistical differences were found between the percentage of Hispanics (86%), blacks (85%), and whites (83%) who reported a crime or neighborhood disturbance and felt the police were helpful.
    About 9 in 10 persons who requested police assistance reported that they were just as likely or more likely to contact the police again for a similar problem.

Police Behavior during Traffic and Street Stops, 2011

October 2, 2013 Comments off

Police Behavior during Traffic and Street Stops, 2011
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Examines the characteristics and experiences of persons age 16 or older who were stopped by police during traffic and street stops, and their perceptions of police behavior and response during these encounters. It describes the outcomes of traffic and street stops by the reason for the stop; demographic characteristics of the persons stopped; race or Hispanic origin of the officers; and whether a ticket was issued, a search was conducted, or force was used. It also describes variations in perceptions of the police across characteristics and outcomes of traffic and street stops. Data are from the 2011 Police-Public Contact Survey, a supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey, which collects information from a nationally representative sample of persons in U.S. households on contact with police during a 12-month period.

Highlights:

  • Relatively more black drivers (13%) than white (10%) and Hispanic (10%) drivers were pulled over in a traffic stop during their most recent contact with police. There were no statistical differences in the race or Hispanic origin of persons involved in street stops.
  • Drivers pulled over by an officer of the same race or ethnicity were more likely (83%) than drivers pulled over by an officer of a different race or ethnicity (74%) to believe that the reason for the traffic stop was legitimate.
  • White drivers were both ticketed and searched at lower rates than black and Hispanic drivers.
  • About 1% of drivers pulled over in traffic stops had physical force used against them by police. Of these drivers, 55% believed the police behaved properly during the stop.

Measuring the Prevalence of Crime with the National Crime Victimization Survey

September 12, 2013 Comments off

Measuring the Prevalence of Crime with the National Crime Victimization Survey
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents comparisons of victimization rates and prevalence rates of nonfatal violent crime and household property crime from 1993 to 2010. The report uses prevalence rates to describe patterns of repeat victimization for violent and property crime and to identify specific population subgroups at the highest risk for repeat victimization. It compares violent victimization and prevalence rates across victim age and sex and according to victim-offender relationships. Data on nonfatal victimizations are from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), which collects information on nonfatal crimes reported and not reported to the police against persons age 12 or older from a nationally representative sample of U.S. households.

Highlights:

  • From 1993 to 2010, the decline in violent victimization rates (down 76%) was greater than the decline in prevalence rates (down 63%).
  • The percentage of violent crime victims who experienced two or more victimizations during a year declined from 23% in 1993 to 17% in 2010. In 2010, this 17% accounted for more than half (54%) of all violent victimizations.
  • Victims of intimate partner violence (21%) were more likely to experience repeat victimization within the year than were victims of stranger violence (9%).
  • The proportion of household property crime victims who reported two or more incidents during the year decreased from 25% in 1993 to 18% in 2010. In 2010, the 18% of repeat household victims accounted for about 41% of all household property victimizations.

Mortality In Local Jails And State Prisons, 2000-2011 – Statistical Tables

August 16, 2013 Comments off

Mortality In Local Jails And State Prisons, 2000-2011 – Statistical Tables
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents national and state-level data on the number of inmate deaths that occurred in local jails and state prisons, how the deaths are distributed across jails, and an aggregate count of deaths in federal prisons. The report presents annual counts and 12-year trends between 2000 and 2011 for deaths in custody. It provides mortality rates and moving averages per 100,000 inmates in custody of jail or prison; details cause of death, including deaths attributed to homicide, suicide, illness, intoxication, and accidental injury; describes decedents’ characteristics, including age, race or Hispanic origin, sex, legal status, and time served; and specifies the state where the deaths occurred. Data sources include the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ Deaths in Custody Reporting Program (DCRP), initiated in 2000 under the Death in Custody Reporting Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-297), and the National Prisoner Statistics series.

Highlights:

  • After a decline in 2008, the mortality rate for jail inmates has remained relatively stable (125 deaths per 100,000 inmates in 2010 and 122 per 100,000 in 2011).
  • Males and females died at nearly equal rates in local jails in 2011.
  • In 2011, 8 in 10 jails (81%) reported zero deaths to the DCRP. From 2000 to 2011, an annual average of 82% of jails reported zero deaths.
  • Between 2001 and 2011, the female prisoner mortality rate fluctuated from 127 to 172 deaths per 100,000 female prisoners. In 2011, the male prisoner mortality rate was 1.6 times higher than the female prisoner mortality rate.
  • The cancer mortality rate increased for both male (up 22%) and female (up 79%) prisoners from 2002 to 2010. The cancer mortality rate for female prisoners showed the greatest increase, from 26 deaths per 100,000 in 2002 to 47 deaths per 100,000 in 2010.

Prisoners In 2012 – Advance Counts

August 7, 2013 Comments off

Prisoners In 2012 – Advance Counts
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents advance counts of prisoners under the jurisdiction of state and federal correctional authorities on December 31, 2012, collected in the National Prisoner Statistics Program. This advance report provides a timely estimate of the 2012 yearend prison populations and compares changes in the prison population during 2012 to changes from yearend 2002 through yearend 2011. The report describes the third consecutive year of decline in the state prison population and growth in the federal prison population. It includes estimates of imprisonment rates by jurisdiction for prisoners sentenced to more than one year and estimates of the distribution of state prisoners by sex, race or Hispanic origin, and offense. The report examines the continued impact of California’s Public Safety Realignment on California’s prison population and on national totals and trends. See also the new data online tool Corrections Statistical Analysis Tool (CSAT) – Prisoners which allows users to generate tables on the numbers and rates of prisoners under the jurisdiction of federal or state correctional authorities from National Prisoner Statistics (NPS) Program.

Highlights:

  • The U.S. prison population declined for the third consecutive year in 2012, from a high of 1,615,487 inmates in 2009 to 1,571,013 at yearend 2012.
  • The U.S. imprisoned 27,770 fewer prisoners (down 1.7%) at yearend 2012 than at yearend 2011.
  • The federal prison population increased by 1,453 prisoners in 2012 (up 0.7%), while the state prison population declined by 29,223 prisoners (down 2.1%).
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