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Forty-Five Percent of Americans Seek Out Organic Foods

August 18, 2014 Comments off

Forty-Five Percent of Americans Seek Out Organic Foods
Source: Gallup

A little less than half of Americans, 45%, actively try to include organic foods in their diets, while 15% actively avoid them. More than a third, 38%, say they “don’t think either way” about organic foods.

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Arkansas, Kentucky Report Sharpest Drops in Uninsured Rate; Medicaid expansion, state exchanges linked to faster reduction in uninsured rate

August 13, 2014 Comments off

Arkansas, Kentucky Report Sharpest Drops in Uninsured Rate; Medicaid expansion, state exchanges linked to faster reduction in uninsured rate
Source: Gallup

Arkansas and Kentucky lead all other states in the sharpest reductions in their uninsured rate among adult residents since the healthcare law’s requirement to have insurance took effect at the beginning of the year. Delaware, Washington, and Colorado round out the top five. All 10 states that report the largest declines in uninsured rates expanded Medicaid and established a state-based marketplace exchange or state-federal partnership.

In U.S., Veterans Report Less Stress, Worry Than Civilians

July 4, 2014 Comments off

In U.S., Veterans Report Less Stress, Worry Than Civilians
Source: Gallup

Americans may understandably believe that the nation’s veterans are suffering emotionally given news reports of high levels of post-traumatic stress disorder and other mood or anxiety disorders among those who have served in the military. However, Gallup finds that among employed Americans, active-duty and veteran populations are more emotionally resilient than their civilian counterparts.

Americans Say Social Media Have Little Sway on Purchases

June 25, 2014 Comments off

Americans Say Social Media Have Little Sway on Purchases
Source: Gallup

A clear majority of Americans say social media have no effect at all on their purchasing decisions. Although many companies run aggressive marketing campaigns on social media, 62% in the U.S. say Facebook and Twitter, among other sites, do not have any influence on their decisions to purchase products.

Despite tremendous numbers of Americans using social media institutions such as Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, and Twitter, only 5% say social media have “a great deal of influence” on their purchasing decisions, while another 30% say these channels have “some influence.” These data, from Gallup’s new State of the American Consumer report, are based on Americans’ self-reported estimates of how much social media campaigns affect their purchasing decisions. While social media may have more influence than some Americans realize or will admit, these data show that relatively few consumers consciously take into account what they learn from social media when making purchases.

Public Faith in Congress Falls Again, Hits Historic Low

June 23, 2014 Comments off

Public Faith in Congress Falls Again, Hits Historic Low
Source: Gallup

Americans’ confidence in Congress has sunk to a new low. Seven percent of Americans say they have “a great deal” or “quite a lot” of confidence in Congress as an American institution, down from the previous low of 10% in 2013. This confidence is starkly different from the 42% in 1973, the first year Gallup began asking the question.

Few Consumers Trust Companies to Keep Online Info Safe

June 20, 2014 Comments off

Few Consumers Trust Companies to Keep Online Info Safe
Source: Gallup

Recent incidents such as Target’s security breach, the Heartbleed bug, and eBay’s systems hack have called attention to how much consumers trust the businesses they patronize to keep their personal information safe. That trust currently appears to be hard to come by. Just 21% of Americans have “a lot of trust” in the businesses or companies they regularly interact with to keep their personal information secure.

Three in Four in U.S. Still See the Bible as Word of God; But 21%, near the 40-year high, consider it fables and history

June 7, 2014 Comments off

Three in Four in U.S. Still See the Bible as Word of God; But 21%, near the 40-year high, consider it fables and history
Source: Gallup

Twenty-eight percent of Americans believe the Bible is the actual word of God and that it should be taken literally. This is somewhat below the 38% to 40% seen in the late 1970s, and near the all-time low of 27% reached in 2001 and 2009. But about half of Americans continue to say the Bible is the inspired word of God, not to be taken literally — meaning a combined 75% believe the Bible is in some way connected to God. About one in five Americans view the Bible in purely secular terms — as ancient fables, legends, history, and precepts written by man — which is up from 13% in 1976.

Same-Sex Marriage Support Reaches New High at 55%

May 25, 2014 Comments off

Same-Sex Marriage Support Reaches New High at 55%
Source: Gallup

Americans’ support for the law recognizing same-sex marriages as legally valid has increased yet again, now at 55%. Marriage equality advocates have had a string of legal successes over the past year, most recently this week in Pennsylvania and Oregon where federal judges struck down bans on gay marriage.

Voter Enthusiasm Down Sharply From 2010

May 15, 2014 Comments off

Voter Enthusiasm Down Sharply From 2010
Source: Gallup

A majority of U.S. registered voters, 53%, say they are less enthusiastic about voting than in previous elections, while 35% are more enthusiastic. This 18-percentage-point enthusiasm deficit is larger than what Gallup has measured in prior midterm election years, particularly in 2010 when there was record midterm enthusiasm.

Gallup-Purdue index releases inaugural findings of national landmark study: It’s Not ‘Where’ You Go To College, But ‘How’ You Go To College; Level of Debt Limits Individual Success and National Economy

May 7, 2014 Comments off

Gallup-Purdue index releases inaugural findings of national landmark study: It’s Not ‘Where’ You Go To College, But ‘How’ You Go To College; Level of Debt Limits Individual Success and National Economy
Source: Gallup/Purdue University

Gallup, in partnership with Purdue University and Lumina Foundation, today released results from the inaugural Gallup-Purdue Index that finds there is no difference in workplace engagement or a college graduate’s well-being if they attended a public or private not-for-profit institution, a highly selective institution, or a top 100-ranked school in U.S. News & World Report. The study found students who were closely engaged with faculty or participated in an internship-type program were more likely to be engaged at work and have high well-being. The study also outlines a relationship between the level of student debt and a graduate’s well-being and entrepreneurial experience.

This comprehensive, nationally representative study of more than 30,000 U.S. college graduates with Internet access will be released annually for the next five years and is based on Gallup’s decades of research experience in employee engagement and well-being An engaged individual is involved in and enthusiastic about their work, is loyal, and productive. Those who are thriving are strong, consistent and progressing. The Gallup-Purdue Index is not a new ranking or rating system but a response to the call for increased accountability in higher education. This study is the first of its kind and will serve as a national benchmark.

The study found that 39% of U.S. graduates are engaged at work without distinction between public vs. private not-for-profit colleges, but there was a substantial difference between graduates of for-profit institutions and the rest. While most graduates are thriving in one or more key dimensions of well-being – purpose, social, financial, community, and physical – 11% are thriving in all five categories.

Graduates who had at least one professor who made them excited about learning, cared about them as a person, and was a mentor, have more than double the odds of being engaged at work and being thriving in well-being. Only 14% of graduates strongly agreed with all three of these questions.

Three times fewer graduates who took out between $20,000 and $40,000 in undergraduate student loan debt are thriving in their well-being compared with those with no school loan debt. Twenty-six percent of graduates with no debt have started their own business, compared with 16% for those with $40,000 or more.

Half in Illinois and Connecticut Want to Move Elsewhere; Montana, Hawaii, Maine boast lowest rate of residents wanting to leave

May 2, 2014 Comments off

Half in Illinois and Connecticut Want to Move Elsewhere; Montana, Hawaii, Maine boast lowest rate of residents wanting to leave
Source: Gallup

Every state has at least some residents who are looking for greener pastures, but nowhere is the desire to move more prevalent than in Illinois and Connecticut. In both of these states, about half of residents say that if given the chance to move to a different state, they would like to do so. Maryland is a close third, at 47%. By contrast, in Montana, Hawaii, and Maine, just 23% say they would like to relocate. Nearly as few — 24% — feel this way in Oregon, New Hampshire, and Texas.

Illinois Residents Least Trusting of Their State Government

April 9, 2014 Comments off

Illinois Residents Least Trusting of Their State Government
Source: Gallup

Illinois residents trust their state government to handle their state’s problems far less than residents in any other state. Twenty-eight percent of Illinois residents trust their state government “a great deal” or “a fair amount.” In contrast, at least 75% of North Dakota, Wyoming, and Utah residents trust their state governments.

Young Americans’ Affinity for Democratic Party Has Grown; Majority have consistently aligned with Democratic Party since 2006

March 29, 2014 Comments off

Young Americans’ Affinity for Democratic Party Has Grown; Majority have consistently aligned with Democratic Party since 2006
Source: Gallup

Young adults — those between the ages of 18 and 29 — have typically aligned themselves with the Democratic Party, but they have become substantially more likely to do so since 2006.

From 1993 to 2003, 47% of 18- to 29-year-olds, on average, identified as Democrats or said they were independents but leaned to the Democratic Party, while 42% were Republicans or Republican leaners. That time span included two years in which young adults tilted Republican, 1994 and 1995, when Republicans won control of Congress. Since 2006, the average gap in favor of the Democratic Party among young adults has been 18 percentage points, 54% to 36%.

This Democratic movement among the young has come at a time when senior citizens have become more Republican. The broader U.S. population has shown more variability in its party preferences in recent years, shifting Democratic from 2005 to 2008, moving back toward the Republican Party from 2009 to 2011, and showing modest Democratic preferences in the last two years.

Provo-Orem, Utah, Leads U.S. Communities in Well-Being

March 26, 2014 Comments off

Provo-Orem, Utah, Leads U.S. Communities in Well-Being
Source: Gallup

Provo-Orem, Utah, has the highest Well-Being Index score (71.4) in the U.S. across 189 communities Gallup and Healthways surveyed in 2012-2013. Also in the top 10 are Boulder, Colo.; Fort Collins-Loveland, Colo.; Honolulu, Hawaii; and San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, Calif.

In U.S., 14% of Those Aged 24 to 34 Are Living With Parents

February 24, 2014 Comments off

In U.S., 14% of Those Aged 24 to 34 Are Living With Parents
Source: Gallup

Fourteen percent of adults between the ages of 24 and 34 — those in the post-college years when most young adults are trying to establish independence — report living at home with their parents. By contrast, roughly half of 18- to 23-year-olds, many of whom are still finishing their education, are currently living at home.

Record-High 42% of Americans Identify as Independents

January 12, 2014 Comments off

Record-High 42% of Americans Identify as Independents
Source: Gallup

Forty-two percent of Americans, on average, identified as political independents in 2013, the highest Gallup has measured since it began conducting interviews by telephone 25 years ago. Meanwhile, Republican identification fell to 25%, the lowest over that time span. At 31%, Democratic identification is unchanged from the last four years but down from 36% in 2008.

Three in 10 in U.S. Own an Array of Consumer Electronics

January 10, 2014 Comments off

Three in 10 in U.S. Own an Array of Consumer Electronics
Source: Gallup

As electronics enthusiasts gather in Las Vegas for the International Consumer Electronics Show this week, a new Gallup analysis finds Americans falling into four groups according to their ownership levels of the electronic devices already available. At one end of the spectrum, 31% are “Super Tech Adopters,” who report broad ownership of the major computing and entertainment devices on the market. At the other extreme, 28% are “Tech-Averse Olders,” who own little more than a basic cellphone and DVD player.

“See Something, Say Something” Unfamiliar to Most Americans

December 25, 2013 Comments off

“See Something, Say Something” Unfamiliar to Most Americans
Source: Gallup

Less than half of Americans say they have heard of the “If You See Something, Say Something” slogan, part of a government campaign designed to raise public awareness of signs of terrorism and terrorism-related crime. An even smaller percentage correctly identify it as targeting terrorism and crime.

U.S. Death Penalty Support Lowest in More Than 40 Years

October 31, 2013 Comments off

U.S. Death Penalty Support Lowest in More Than 40 Years
Source: Gallup

Sixty percent of Americans say they favor the death penalty for convicted murderers, the lowest level of support Gallup has measured since November 1972, when 57% were in favor. Death penalty support peaked at 80% in 1994, but it has gradually declined since then.

Dysfunctional Gov’t Surpasses Economy as Top U.S. Problem

October 17, 2013 Comments off

Dysfunctional Gov’t Surpasses Economy as Top U.S. Problem
Source: Gallup

Americans are now more likely to name dysfunctional government as the most important problem facing the country than to name any other specific problem. Thirty-three percent of Americans cite dissatisfaction with government and elected representatives as the nation’s top issue, the highest such percentage in Gallup’s trend dating back to 1939. Dysfunctional government now eclipses the economy (19%), unemployment (12%), the deficit (12%), and healthcare (12%) as the nation’s top problem.

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