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National Information Standards Organization (NISO) Strategic Directions

January 14, 2015 Comments off

NISO Strategic Directions (PDF)
Source: National Information Standards Organization
From press release:

The Architecture Committee of the National Information Standards Organization (NISO) has issued a NISO Strategic Directions document that identifies the trends and emerging themes that will direct the future development portfolios of standards and recommended practices. In 2007, NISO created a new governance structure and, as part of this restructuring, implemented the NISO Framework, an overarching model and roadmap for NISO’s standards work. Seven years later, NISO continues to structure the standards portfolio around the core areas of Content and Collection Management, Business Information, and Discovery and Delivery—with a Topic Committee providing leadership for each area. The Architecture Committee determines overall strategic vision for NISO’s work, oversees the work of the Topic Committees, and addresses any overlapping areas. The 2015 Strategic Directions document reflects a review by the Topic Committees of their current and recent portfolios, and a discussion of potential future activities where NISO should be involved in the development of new standards and recommended practices.

Hat tip: InfoDOCKET

Panel Paper: Financial Crisis and Increase in Income Inequality Across Cities

January 8, 2015 Comments off

Panel Paper: Financial Crisis and Increase in Income Inequality Across Cities
Source: Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management

This paper investigates why the level of income inequality differs across U.S. cities. We also explore why some cities experienced faster increases in the level of inequality than others. Using the Decennial Census and the American Community Survey (ACS) from 1980 to 2011, we explore whether the disparities in the level and the changes in the level of inequality can be explained by MSA characteristics, including labor market conditions, skill distribution, residential mobility, racial concentration, industrial composition and unionization. We also examine how state level policies such as unemployment insurance benefits and minimum wage level is associated with income inequality.

Our findings shows that negative labor market conditions, concentration of skilled workers and racial segregation are positively associated with the level of income inequality. The level of inequality in these cities also tends to rise grow at a faster pace. While the minimum wage do not seem to have any association with income inequality, we find some evidence that the unemployment insurance benefit and percent of union members lower the increase in the income inequality.

AASHTO and APTA’s 2015 Bottom Line Report Estimates $163 Billion Needed Annually to Fix Nation’s Aging Surface Transportation System

December 31, 2014 Comments off

AASHTO and APTA’s 2015 Bottom Line Report Estimates $163 Billion Needed Annually to Fix Nation’s Aging Surface Transportation System
Source: American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials and the American Public Transportation Association

The “2015 Bottom Line Report” on transportation investment needs, released today by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials and the American Public Transportation Association, estimates that to meet current demand it will require an annual capital investment over six years by all levels of government in the amount of $120 billion in the nation’s highway and bridge network and $43 billion in America’s public transportation infrastructure. To meet the combined surface transportation needs, it would require an investment of $163 billion investment per year in surface transportation over a six year period. Despite those dramatic investment needs, currently only $83 billion is invested in roads and bridges, while just $17.1 billion is invested in public transit.

ABA Section of Legal Education reports 2014 law school enrollment data

December 23, 2014 Comments off

ABA Section of Legal Education reports 2014 law school enrollment data
Source: American Bar Association

The American Bar Association today released national figures for first-year and total J.D. enrollment for the fall of 2014.

The 204 ABA-approved law schools reported total J.D. enrollment (full-time and part-time students) of 119,775. This is a decrease of 8,935 students (6.9 percent) from 2013 and a 17.5 percent decrease from the historic high total J.D. enrollment in 2010. The 2014 total enrollment is the lowest since 1987, when there were 175 ABA-approved law schools.

Law schools reported that 37,924 full-time and part-time students began their studies in the fall of 2014. This is a decrease of 1,751 students (4.4 percent) from 2013 and a 27.7 percent decrease from the historic high 1L enrollment of 52,488 in 2010. The 2014 1L enrollment is the lowest since 1973, when there were 151 ABA-approved law schools.

Nearly two-thirds of ABA law schools (127) experienced declines in first-year enrollment from the prior year. At 64 law schools, 1L declines exceeded 10 percent. At 25 schools, 1L enrollment declined by more than 20 percent. Twenty-five schools reported entering classes of fewer than 100 students.

ASTHO Announces Release of 2014 National Health Security Preparedness Index™

December 15, 2014 Comments off

ASTHO Announces Release of 2014 National Health Security Preparedness Index™
Source: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) and CDC

The Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO), in partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and more than 35 development partners, released today the 2014 National Health Security Preparedness Index™ (NHSPI™), which measures and advances the nation’s readiness to protect people during a health emergency or disaster. The 2014 Index includes updated data and new content, especially in the areas of healthcare delivery and environmental health.

The 2014 national result,7.4 on a scale of 10, suggests that substantial health security preparedness capability exists across the nation with progress to sustain and build upon. It also suggests significant work still needs to be done. As with 2013 findings, 2014 areas of relative strength include Countermeasure Management, Incident & Information Management, and Health Security Surveillance. Areas suggesting need for greater development include the new domain of Environmental & Occupational Health, and Healthcare Delivery (previously Surge Management) and Community Planning & Engagement.

Report — More Hispanics Earning Bachelor’s Degrees in Physical Sciences and Engineering

December 9, 2014 Comments off

More Hispanics Earning Bachelor’s Degrees in Physical Sciences and Engineering
Source: American Institute of Physics

A new report from the American Institute of Physics (AIP) Statistical Research Center has found that the number of Hispanic students receiving bachelor’s degrees in the physical sciences and engineering has increased over the last decade or so, passing 10,000 degrees per year for the first time in 2012. The overall number of U.S. students receiving degrees in those fields also increased over the same time, but it increased faster among Hispanics.

From 2002 to 2012, the number of Hispanics earning bachelor’s degrees in the physical sciences rose 78 percent compared to an overall increase of 47 percent in all U.S. bachelor’s degrees earned in those same fields. Similarly, Hispanics earning bachelor’s degrees in engineering rose 64 percent, compared to just a 34 percent increase in the overall population.

“HowOpenIsIt?®” Open Access Spectrum (OAS)

November 13, 2014 Comments off

“HowOpenIsIt?®” Open Access Spectrum (OAS)
Source: PLOS, Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA)

The “HowOpenIsIt?®” Open Access Spectrum (OAS) guide standardizes Open Access terminology in an easily understandable, comprehensive resource created by PLOS, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) and the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA). The guide defines core components of Open Access derived from the articulation of basic tenets in the 2002 Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI).

“HowOpenIsIt?®” OAS moves the conversation from “Is It Open Access?” to “HowOpenIsIt?®” and illustrates a nuanced continuum of more versus less open to enable users to compare and contrast publications and policies across a grid of clearly defined components related to readership, reuse, copyright, author and automatic posting, and machine readability.

The guide has been vetted and refined in a practical use pilot of 100 journals by PLOS, SPARC and Copernicus Publications in consultation with OASPA, Securing a Hybrid Environment for Research Preservation and Access (SHERPA) and Infrastructures for Open Access (IS4OA).

Through the work of volunteer translators, the guide is available in Spanish, Chinese, Italian, Portuguese and French for use around the world by authors, libraries, research funders, government agencies, institutions and other interested parties.

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