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Dr. Ian Dunbar’s Dog Bite Scale

July 8, 2015 Comments off

Dr. Ian Dunbar’s Dog Bite Scale (PDF)
Source: Association of Pet Dog Trainers

An assessment of the severity of biting problems based on an objective evaluation of wound pathology

CGS Report Highlights Completion Trends of Underrepresented Minorities in STEM Doctoral Programs

June 29, 2015 Comments off

CGS Report Highlights Completion Trends of Underrepresented Minorities in STEM Doctoral Programs
Source: Council of Graduate Schools (CGS)

The Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) today released findings from the Doctoral Initiative on Minority Attrition and Completion (DIMAC), a 3-year study that examined patterns of degree completion and attrition among underrepresented minorities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields. Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF #1138814), the project collected data from doctoral students at twenty-one universities in the United States, including universities affiliated with NSF’s Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP) program.

The most recent project in a series of CGS research studies on doctoral completion trends, DIMAC has resulted in the most comprehensive account of STEM doctoral completion and attrition for underrepresented minorities (URM) in the U.S. In the context of the study, URM includes U.S. students and permanent residents who self-identify as American Indian/Alaska Native, Black/African-American, and Hispanic/Latino.

The DIMAC report provides completion rates, attrition rates, times-to-degree and times-to-attrition of URM STEM doctoral students using data spanning academic years 1992/93 to 2011/12. There is some data to suggest that from the earliest cohort to the most recent, there have been slight improvements in completion outcomes.

A key finding of the data on student completion rates is that completion outcomes vary by student characteristics, with some of the most notable differences emerging in the analysis of race/ethnicity and field of study. Over a ten-year period, 54% of students completed a doctorate. Looking at ten-year completion data by student characteristics,

  • doctoral students in the life sciences completed at 63%, while candidates in physical &mathematical sciences experienced a rate of 45%.
  • Hispanic/Latinos completed at a rate of 58%, while Black/African Americans completed at a rate of50%.
  • women completed at a rate of 56%, while the ten-year completion rate for men was 52%.
  • ten-year completion was 57% for students with a prior master’s degree, and 52% for those withouta master’s.

National Academy of Inventors and Intellectual Property Owners Association Announce Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Patents Rankings

June 26, 2015 Comments off

National Academy of Inventors and Intellectual Property Owners Association Announce Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Patents Rankings
Source: National Academy of Inventors and Intellectual Property Owners Association

The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO) have announced the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2014. The report, published annually since 2013, utilizes data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to highlight the important role patents play in university research and innovation.

The NAI and IPO compile the rankings each year by calculating the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office which list a university as the first assignee on the printed patent. The full report of the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted Patents in 2014 can be found at www.Academyofinventors.com/pdf/NAI-IPO-Top-100-Universities-2014.pdf

The top 15 universities worldwide ranked include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Tsinghua University (China), Stanford University, University of Texas, California Institute of Technology, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Johns Hopkins University, Columbia University, University of Michigan, National Tsing Hua University (Taiwan), Korea Institute of Science Technology, University of South Florida, University of Pennsylvania, and the Institute of Microelectronics of Chinese Academy of Science.

ACPA Resource Guide To Chronic Pain Medication & Treatment — 2014 Edition

June 24, 2015 Comments off

ACPA Resource Guide To Chronic Pain Medication & Treatment — 2014 Edition (PDF)
Source: American Chronic Pain Association

The American Chronic Pain Association (ACPA) advocates a multi-modal strategy for dealing with chronic pain. The ACPA focuses on pain management skills and self-help strategies that individuals can use with the approval of their healthcare providers.

The ACPA considers the use of medication and other treatments to be a matter for individuals to determine in conjunction with their healthcare provider. The ACPA takes no position on medical treatment choices. Thus, information the ACPA provides about medical care is educational and informative only.

The ACPA Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Medication & Treatment is an unbiased consensus document that combines practical clinical ex perience and the most recent scientific information.

State IT Workforce: Facing Reality with Innovation

May 14, 2015 Comments off

State IT Workforce: Facing Reality with Innovation
Source: National Association of State Chief Information Officers

The predicted shortage in the state information technology (IT) workforce has been discussed and debated for over a decade and states have been confronted with numerous challenges when it comes to identifying gaps in a changing IT workforce. A major concern for state CIOs continues to be the significant number of state IT employees who are eligible for retirement or have been eligible, but have postponed retirement due to the economic downturn. In spite of this, there is evidence that the economy is recovering and some states are experiencing record numbers of retirement. This report outlines the current data on the state IT workforce and focuses on innovation, best practices and recommendations.

All the President’s Psychologists

April 30, 2015 Comments off

All the President’s Psychologists (PDF)

Lead authors:
Stephen Soldz, Ph.D.
Nathaniel Raymond
Steven Reisner, Ph.D.

Co­authors:
Scott A. Allen, M.D. 
Isaac L. Baker
Allen S. Keller, M.D.

Reviewer:
Jean Maria Arrigo, Ph.D.

This report analyzes emails from the accounts of deceased RAND Corporation researcher and apparent CIA (Central Intelligence Agency) contractor Mr. Scott Gerwehr.1 Sixteen emails were selected for detailed analysis from a larger collection of 638 emails that were obtained by Mr. James Risen, author of Pay Any Price and a reporter for the New York Times. The emails were provided to the authors for analysis with the approval of the original sources of the emails, and with the agreement that only those selected as most relevant to the scope of the report would be released. All 638 emails were reviewed by the authors.

No findings of this report were in any way contradicted by the emails not included. The time frame of the emails analyzed in this report spans 2003 to 2006. (See more on methods and sources of data in Appendix I.) This report also includes publicly available information obtained from a variety of sources including the American Psychological Association’s website, released government documents, and reports in the media

Emails were selected for detailed analysis because they are evidence of the George W. Bush Administration’s integral role in shaping American Psychological Association (APA) ethics policy on psychologist participation in national security interrogations after September 11, 2001. Other emails were chosen because they either conflict with or contradict past public statements made by APA officials, as well as disclose new information related to this issue that the APA appears to have concealed. (See Appendix II for all primary source emails cited in this report.)

Based on analysis of the Gerwehr emails and reference to related open source documents, the authors note five key findings related to the APA:

1. The APA secretly coordinated with officials from the CIA, White House, and the Department of Defense to create an APA ethics policy on national security interrogations that comported with then­classified legal guidance authorizing the CIA torture program.

2. A US government research scientist, who had recently served as President Bush’s behavioral science advisor, is reported to have secretly drafted “language related to research” inserted by APA officials into the 2005 APA ethics policy on interrogations. While the exact language of the alleged contribution is not known, the section on research aligned that policy with the then­-classified Bradbury “torture memos.” The Bradbury memos directed health professionals to research and assess the supposed safety, efficacy, and health impacts of the “enhanced” interrogation techniques. The memos were introduced at a time when CIA Office of Medical Services (OMS) personnel were protesting the expanded involvement of health professionals in helping determine the legality of the techniques.

3. The APA had numerous contacts with CIA contract psychologists Drs. James Mitchell and Bruce Jessen starting in at least 2003, including contacts related to interrogation techniques; at least one senior APA official was informed of their clandestine role at the CIA related to interrogations; yet APA has consistently denied such contacts.

4. APA did not disclose Dr. James Mitchell’s past APA membership when it released its 2007 statement in response to journalists’ revelations regarding Mitchell’s role in abusive interrogations. Nor did APA include such information in its letter to the Texas State Board of Examiners of Psychologists in 2010; APA staff sought to obscure past contacts with the CIA and with Mitchell and Jessen and their firm, Mitchell Jessen and Associates.

5. Despite substantial contact between the APA, the White House and CIA officials, including the over 600 emails noted in this report, there is no evidence that any APA official expressed concern over mounting reports of psychologist involvement in detainee abuse during four years of direct email communications with senior members of the US intelligence community.

See: American Psychological Association Bolstered C.I.A. Torture Program, Report Says (New York Times)

New Report Identifies Possible Next Steps in U.S. Energy Development

April 27, 2015 Comments off

New Report Identifies Possible Next Steps in U.S. Energy Development
Source: American Geosciences Institute

The U.S. energy portfolio changes over time. Scientific and technologic advances related to hydraulic fracturing have dramatically increased the supply of U.S. oil and gas; because of this, a methane economy – in which natural gas provides the leading share of primary energy consumption – is now a possible scenario for U.S. energy development. In a report released by the American Geosciences Institute (AGI), the social, political, technical and environmental components of a methane economy are identified. The report also addresses how industry, government and the public might best work together to advance common energy goals.

The report is based on the inaugural AGI Critical Issues Forum where experts were asked to consider whether a natural gas-dominant economy is achievable in North America and if such an economy would be desirable. In this forum, U.S. geoscientists, economists and environmental experts identified barriers and enablers to such an economy. They reviewed geological, infrastructural, technological, and financial factors that may affect future gas supplies and the demand for natural gas. The experts also considered the environmental, health, and safety factors that may have a significant effect on the development of natural gas.

One of the conclusions of the report is that social license granted by consensus public opinion – at the national, state and local levels – can be either a substantial enabler or barrier to a methane economy, and its importance cannot be overstated.

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