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OPM — Pay & Leave: Furlough Guidance

September 25, 2013 Comments off

Pay & Leave: Furlough Guidance
Source: Office of Personnel Management

The U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) has prepared human resources guidance for agencies and employees in the event of furloughs. There are two types of furloughs -

An administrative furlough is a planned event by an agency which is designed to absorb reductions necessitated by downsizing, reduced funding, lack of work, or any budget situation other than a lapse in appropriations. Furloughs that would potentially result from sequestration would generally be considered administrative furloughs.

A shutdown furlough (also called an emergency furlough) occurs when there is a lapse in appropriations, and can occur at the beginning of a fiscal year, if no funds have been appropriated for that year, or upon expiration of a continuing resolution, if a new continuing resolution or appropriations law is not passed. In a shutdown furlough, an affected agency would have to shut down any activities funded by annual appropriations that are not excepted by law. Typically, an agency will have very little to no lead time to plan and implement a shutdown furlough.

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Interim Investigative Report – Improper Contracting and Procurement Practices Utilized to Circumvent the Competitive Bid Process

April 12, 2013 Comments off

Interim Investigative Report – Improper Contracting and Procurement Practices Utilized to Circumvent the Competitive Bid Process (PDF)
Source: U.S. Office of Personnel Management, Office of Inspector General

While we identified misuse of position and mismanagement within OPM, we did not identify any evidence that Director Berry engaged in any inappropriate conduct. During our investigation, w e learned that Director Berry established an initiative within the agency that directed OPM department heads to proactive ly address poor performance. OPM personnel later referenced the Director’s initiative when communicating about Mr. Liff, which may have contributed to the pressure or time sensitivity perceived by certain individuals.

In conclusion, our investigation has raised serious concerns a bout the stewardship of taxpayer funds by HRS and FSC . In this instance, Federal contracting procedures designed to promote economy, effectiveness, and efficiency were bypassed . This is consistent with the findings of the DOL – OIG ’s investigation .

OPM — 2012 Salary Tables and Related Information

December 28, 2011 Comments off
Source:  Office of Personnel Management

The General Schedule (GS) classification and pay system covers the majority of civilian white-collar Federal employees (about 1.5 million worldwide) in professional, technical, administrative, and clerical positions. GS classification standards, qualifications, pay structure, and related human resources policies (e.g., general staffing and pay administration policies) are administered by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) on a Governmentwide basis. Each agency classifies its GS positions and appoints and pays its GS employees filling those positions following statutory and OPM guidelines.

The General Schedule has 15 grades–GS-1 (lowest) to GS-15 (highest). Agencies establish (classify) the grade of each job based on the level of difficulty, responsibility, and qualifications required. Individuals with a high school diploma and no additional experience typically qualify for GS-2 positions; those with a Bachelor’s degree for GS-5 positions; and those with a Master’s degree for GS-9 positions.

Each grade has 10 step rates (steps 1-10) that are each worth approximately 3 percent of the employee’s salary. Within-grade step increases are based on an acceptable level of performance and longevity (waiting periods of 1 year at steps 1-3, 2 years at steps 4-6, and 3 years at steps 7-9). It normally takes 18 years to advance from step 1 to step 10 within a single GS grade if an employee remains in that single grade. However, employees with outstanding (or equivalent) performance ratings may be considered for additional, quality step increases (maximum of one per year).

More Than 72,000 Veterans Hired in Federal Government in FY 2010

June 17, 2011 Comments off

More Than 72,000 Veterans Hired in Federal Government in FY 2010
Source: Office of Personnel Management

The U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) has released Employment of Veterans in the Federal Executive Branch for Fiscal Year (FY) 2010, a document which tells a success story of the hiring of 72,133 ve

The document also highlights two other important accomplishments. First, 25.6 percent of total new hires across the federal government in FY 2010 were veterans. This is a 1.6 percentage point increase from FY 2009. Second, of the veterans hired in FY 2010, 23,140 are disabled veterans compared to 20,448 in FY 2009. This is a 1.2 percentage point increase.

+ Employment of Veterans in the Federal Executive Branch – Fiscal Year 2010 (PDF)

OPM — Federal Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program FY 2010

June 15, 2011 Comments off

Federal Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program FY 2010
Source: Office of Personnel Management

The Federal workforce is 17.7 percent Black, 8.0 percent Hispanic, 5.6 percent Asian/Pacific Islander, 1.8 percent Native American, 0.7 percent non-Hispanic/Multi-racial, and 66.2 percent White. Minorities as a whole constituted 33.8 percent of the FW. Men comprised 56.1 percent of all Federal permanent employees and women 43.9 percent.

Progress has been made with respect to the representation of women and minorities at higher pay level positions in the FW. The number of women in Senior Pay levels increased by 7.9 percent (from 6,341 to 6,839). Minority employees in Senior Pay levels increased by 9.4 percent (from 3,709 to 4,059).

The Report shows the representation of women and minorities in professional and administrative positions has also increased. The representation rate of minorities in these positions rose by 7.4 percent (from 332,934 to 357,468). The number of women represented in professional and administrative positions increased by 5.1 percent (from 505,111 to 531,062).

Report to Congress on Nursing Faculty and the Intergovernmental Personnel Act Mobility Program: The Forum, Findings, and Recommendations

May 12, 2011 Comments off

Report to Congress on Nursing Faculty and the Intergovernmental Personnel Act Mobility Program: The Forum, Findings, and Recommendations (PDF)
Source: Office of Personnel Management

The shortage of nursing faculty in the United States is a complex issue that directly impacts the ability of colleges and universities to graduate qualified nurses. Congress has requested information from the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) on how the Intergovernmental Personnel Act (IPA) mobility program is being used to alleviate the nurse and nurse faculty shortage. In response to the congressional request, OPM has

  • Researched the adequacy of the supply of nurses and nurse faculty;
  • Gathered data about IPA usage and Federal nursing population; and
  • Convened a forum of nursing representatives from Federal agencies employing more than2,000 nurses.

This report includes background research on the nurse and nurse faculty supply and findings from the forum, including agencies’ perception of the adequacy of the supply of nurses, current IPA usage, barriers and challenges to using the IPA mobility program, recommendations for increasing use of the IPA mobility program and actions taken by agencies, independent of the IPA mobility program, to increase the number of nurses in training.

Guide to Telework in the Federal Government

April 20, 2011 Comments off

Guide to Telework in the Federal Government (PDF)
Source: U.S. Office of Personnel Management

The Federal Government is a leader in the use of innovative workplace flexibilities, including telework. In March 2010, President Obama hosted a White House Forum on flexibilities, emphasizing their vital role in recruiting and retaining the best and brightest workers and maximizing their effectivenessCongress passed the Telework Enhancement Act of 2010 to catalyze expansion.

Federal telework programs are established primarily to meet agency mission and operational needs. Telework saves money by helping government reduce real estate and energy costs and promote management efficiencies; makes us more resilient in severe weather and other emergencies; improves the quality of employee work-life; and increases employment opportunities for persons with disabilities.

Advances in information technology have paved the way for increased telework. However, telework is not a new concept and is not necessarily dependent on the use of technology. The key is for managers and employees to clearly define the work expectations and objectives, and then to give employees the tools and flexibility needed to get the job done.

This Guide to Telework in the Federal Government outlines practical information to assist Federal agencies, managers, supervisors, Telework Managing Officers1, other staff responsible for implementing telework, and employees. Perhaps you are an employee who would like to know more about telework. Maybe you manage or supervise teleworking staff and hope to develop a better understanding of the day-to-day aspects of this important flexibility. You may be a Telework Managing Officer or another staff member tasked with oversight or operational responsibilities related to the telework program at your agency. Perhaps you are a labor representative with a need to know the finer points of a great telework program. If any of these describe your situation, then this Guide is for you.

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