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Country Analysis Brief: China

May 19, 2015 Comments off

Country Analysis Brief: China
Source: Energy Information Administration

China is the world’s most populous country with a fast-growing economy that has led it to be the largest energy consumer and producer in the world. Rapidly increasing energy demand, especially for petroleum and other liquids, has made China influential in world energy markets.

DoD Release of the Report of Military and Security Developments in China

May 14, 2015 Comments off

DoD Release of the Report of Military and Security Developments in China
Source: U.S. Department of Defense

Department of Defense released the “Military and Security Developments Involving the People’s Republic of China”. This annual report informs Congress of the Department of Defense’s assessment of military and security developments involving China.

As stipulated by law, the report is a DoD product and is transmitted to Congress by the secretary of defense. It is coordinated with other agencies and departments across the U.S. government and is the authoritative assessment from the United States government on military and security developments involving China.

Spring 2015 Brookings Panel on Economic Activity

May 3, 2015 Comments off

Spring 2015 Brookings Panel on Economic Activity
Source: Brookings Institution

New research findings at the Spring 2015 BPEA conference by leading academic and government economists include: a cause of growing inequality; the possible outcomes of an early Federal Reserve boost in the interest rates; public sentiment concerning redistributive fiscal plans; the economic welfare impacts of the fracking boom; an assessment of Chinese government-sponsored firms; and the possible consequences of anonymizing big data.

Destination China: The Country Adjusts to its New Migration Reality

April 29, 2015 Comments off

Destination China: The Country Adjusts to its New Migration Reality
Source: Migration Policy Institute

China’s place in the global migration order has been transformed by three decades of rapid economic development. Policies to reform and open the country initiated in 1978 accelerated Chinese emigration and internal migration towards the industrialized coast. While these flows remain important, another trend has gained momentum: Increasing numbers of foreigners are making their way to China.

Migration to China is exceptionally diverse. With a robust economy, welcoming universities, and low living costs, the country attracts people from all parts of the world. Relatively lenient visa policies have allowed entry to migrants from a range of backgrounds. The passage of new legislation in 2012, however, marked a step towards stricter immigration control.

Increased Use of Digital Technologies Could Add $1.36 Trillion to World’s Top 10 Economies in 2020, According to New Study from Accenture

April 13, 2015 Comments off

Increased Use of Digital Technologies Could Add $1.36 Trillion to World’s Top 10 Economies in 2020, According to New Study from Accenture
Source: Accenture

The increased use of digital technologies could boost productivity for the world’s top 10 economies and add US$1.36 trillion to their total economic output in 2020, according to a new study by Accenture (NYSE: ACN). The study is based on the Accenture Digital Density Index, a tool that helps companies make better strategic investments based on granular measures of digital performance.

The Accenture Digital Density Index measures the extent to which digital technologies penetrate a country’s businesses and economy. A country’s “digital density” is determined by a scorecard comprising over 50 indicators, such as the volume of transactions conducted online, the use of cloud or other technologies to streamline processes, the pervasiveness of technology skills in a company, or an economy’s acceptance of new digitally driven business models.

At its broadest level, the Index reveals that a ten point improvement in digital density (on a 100-point scale) over five years would lift GDP growth rates in advanced economies by 0.25 percentage points, and by 0.5 percentage point in emerging economies. That would give the U.S. an uplift to GDP of US$365 billion in 2020. Emerging economies, such as Brazil, India and China could see rises of between $97 billion and $418 billion.

China’s Economic Ties with ASEAN: A Country-By-Country Analysis

March 23, 2015 Comments off

China’s Economic Ties with ASEAN: A Country-By-Country Analysis
Source: U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission (USCC)

This paper assesses China’s relative significance for individual ASEAN economies. It starts with an overview of China’s trade and investment relations with ASEAN as a whole. The paper then provides descriptive statistics on each ASEAN country’s composition of foreign trade by product and top trade partner, as well as foreign direct investment (FDI) flows. It also provides a brief analysis of commercial disputes and bilateral cooperation with China.

Costs of Selected Policies to Address Air Pollution in China

March 9, 2015 Comments off

Costs of Selected Policies to Address Air Pollution in China
Source: RAND Corporation

Air pollution has been one of the most pernicious consequences of China’s last three decades of economic transformation and growth. Concentrations of pollutants exceed standards recommended by the World Health Organization in virtually every major urban area. The large costs of air pollution are driven by health impacts and loss of productivity, running 6.5 percent of China’s gross domestic product each year between 2000 and 2010, and rising as China’s population becomes more urbanized and productive. This report estimates the costs of three measures to reduce air pollution in China: replacing coal with natural gas for residential and commercial heating, replacing half of China‘s coal-fired electric power generation with renewables or nuclear power, and scrapping highly polluting vehicles. The recurring annual costs of replacing coal with natural gas for residential and commercial heating could run from $32 billion to $52 billion, and replacing half of China‘s coal-fired electric power generation with renewables or nuclear power would run about $184 billion, for total recurring costs ranging from $215 billion to $235 billion annually. China could also incur one-off costs of $21 billion to $42 billion for scrapping highly polluting vehicles. Subtracting the value of the coal ($75 billion) for which these fuels would substitute, net annual costs in aggregate would run $140 billion to $160 billion annually, less than one-third of the annual cost of air pollution in China, which was roughly $535 billion in 2012.

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