Archive

Archive for the ‘Transportation Research Board’ Category

New Report Says U.S. Freight Rail Regulations Outdated, Recommends Modernization Efforts

June 17, 2015 Comments off

New Report Says U.S. Freight Rail Regulations Outdated, Recommends Modernization Efforts
Source: Transportation Research Board

While a 1980 reform law enabled the modernization and stabilization of the U.S. freight railroad industry, federal regulation has not kept pace with the industry’s transformation and should be replaced with a system better-suited for today’s freight rail system, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Research Council’s Transportation Research Board. Current policies designed to protect rail shippers who lack transportation options from excessive rates are not working for shippers of most commodities, including grain. More appropriate, reliable, and usable procedures are needed to resolve these rate disputes without threatening the earnings railroads need to pay for their capital-intensive networks.

The Essential Federal Role in Highway Research and Innovation

May 31, 2015 Comments off

The Essential Federal Role in Highway Research and Innovation
Source: Transportation Research Board

TRB Special Report 317: The Essential Federal Role in Highway Research and Innovation summarizes conclusions and advice on the Federal Highway Administration’s (FHWA’s) critical role in highway research, development, and technology (RD&T) that have been developed over the years by TRB’s Research and Technology Coordinating Committee (RTCC).

The RTCC is charged to monitor and review the FHWA’s research and technology activities; provide advice to FHWA on the setting of a research agenda and coordination of highway research with states, universities, and other partners; review strategies to accelerate the deployment and adoption of innovation; and identify areas where research may be needed.

The RTCC concludes that FHWA plays an essential role in exploratory, advanced research; addresses national priorities that other highway RD&T programs do not address; and facilitates adoption of innovations at the state and local level through technology transfer.

Along with its other responsibilities, the RTCC notes that FHWA will play a particularly important role with ensuring the standardization of safety alerts to motorists between infrastructure and vehicles as part of the national connected vehicle initiative as well as assisting transportation agencies in implementing the many innovations developed in the second Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP 2).

The Role of U.S. Airports in the National Economy

May 28, 2015 Comments off

The Role of U.S. Airports in the National Economy
Source: Transportation Research Board

TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Report 132: The Role of U.S. Airports in the National Economy examines the economic role of U.S. airports and the national airport system to help communicate the national aggregate value of airports to communities and aviation stakeholders.

Airport Emergency Post-Event Recovery Practices

May 27, 2015 Comments off

Airport Emergency Post-Event Recovery Practices
Source: Transportation Research Board

TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Synthesis 60: Airport Emergency Post-Event Recovery Practices explores approaches to improving the overall resiliency of airports through planning for the recovery phase of emergency response.

Overcoming Barriers to Deployment of Plug-in Electric Vehicles (2015)

May 26, 2015 Comments off

Overcoming Barriers to Deployment of Plug-in Electric Vehicles (2015)
Source: Transportation Research Board/National Research Council

In the past few years, interest in plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) has grown. Advances in battery and other technologies, new federal standards for carbon-dioxide emissions and fuel economy, state zero-emission-vehicle requirements, and the current administration’s goal of putting millions of alternative-fuel vehicles on the road have all highlighted PEVs as a transportation alternative. Consumers are also beginning to recognize the advantages of PEVs over conventional vehicles, such as lower operating costs, smoother operation, and better acceleration; the ability to fuel up at home; and zero tailpipe emissions when the vehicle operates solely on its battery. There are, however, barriers to PEV deployment, including the vehicle cost, the short all-electric driving range, the long battery charging time, uncertainties about battery life, the few choices of vehicle models, and the need for a charging infrastructure to support PEVs. What should industry do to improve the performance of PEVs and make them more attractive to consumers?

At the request of Congress, Overcoming Barriers to Deployment of Plug-in Electric Vehicles identifies barriers to the introduction of electric vehicles and recommends ways to mitigate these barriers. This report examines the characteristics and capabilities of electric vehicle technologies, such as cost, performance, range, safety, and durability, and assesses how these factors might create barriers to widespread deployment. Overcoming Barriers to Deployment of Plug-in Electric Vehicles provides an overview of the current status of PEVs and makes recommendations to spur the industry and increase the attractiveness of this promising technology for consumers. Through consideration of consumer behaviors, tax incentives, business models, incentive programs, and infrastructure needs, this book studies the state of the industry and makes recommendations to further its development and acceptance.

Evaluating Methods for Counting Aircraft Operations at Non-Towered Airports

March 28, 2015 Comments off

Evaluating Methods for Counting Aircraft Operations at Non-Towered Airports
Source: Transportation Research Board

TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Report 129: Evaluating Methods for Counting Aircraft Operations at Non-Towered Airports reviews techniques and technologies applied at airports without air traffic control towers to estimate aircraft operations.

Improving Transit Integration Among Multiple Providers (Vol. 1 – Transit Integration Manual)

March 11, 2015 Comments off

Improving Transit Integration Among Multiple Providers (Vol. 1 – Transit Integration Manual)
Source: Transportation Research Board

TCRP Report 173: Improving Transit Integration Among Multiple Providers presents a comprehensive set of guidelines and procedures to assist transit agencies in evaluating, planning, and implementing steps to integrate transit services in areas with multiple transit providers. The report comprises two volumes: the Transit Integration Manual and the Research Report. Together, these documents can help guide the process of transit service integration by (1) showing the benefits of integration; (2) illustrating the range of potential types of integration activities; and (3) describing procedures necessary to carry out integration efforts, including tips for success.

This report will be of interest to transit operators, metropolitan planning organizations, and others interested in the coordination and integration of transit services to improve customer service in areas with multiple transit providers.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,049 other followers