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Archive for the ‘U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’ Category

DHS OIG — The DHS Visa Security Program

September 22, 2014 Comments off

The DHS Visa Security Program (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of Inspector General

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Visa Security Program is intended to prevent terrorists, criminals, and other ineligible applicants from receiving visas. DHS assigns special agents with expertise in immigration law and counterterrorism to U.S. diplomatic posts overseas to perform visa security activities. We reviewed the program’s effectiveness in preventing ineligible applicants from receiving U.S. visas; DHS’ annual reporting to Congress on the program’s expansion; and the efforts to expand the program to additional overseas posts, including the potential impact of a new initiative, the Pre‐Adjudicated Threat Recognition and Intelligence Operations Team.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is required to employ mechanisms that measure and accurately report the program’s performance to determine its value. However, current performance measures for the Visa Security Program do not include key aspects to determine its effectiveness. In addition, ICE has not taken actions to assure that (1) data needed to assess program performance is collected and reported, (2) consular officers receive appropriate advice and training, and (3) Visa Security Program hours are tracked and used to determine staffing and funding needs. Without these types of information, ICE cannot ensure that the Visa Security Program is operating as intended.

DHS has consistently delivered their annual reports to Congress late, reducing their usefulness. ICE should take appropriate steps to ensure that Congress receives future reports in a timely manner.

To date, ICE has established only 20 visa security units. Congressional leaders have repeatedly expressed concerns that the program has not expanded to more visa‐issuing posts. ICE’s responses to these concerns have stressed funding challenges, a limited number of trained special agents, and Department of State challenges to make space and provide support for DHS’ overseas presence.

According to ICE officials, a solution to the program’s slow expansion may be the Pre‐ Adjudicated Threat Recognition and Intelligence Operations Team. ICE officials explained that this new initiative will eventually be capable of screening visa applications from all visa‐issuing posts. However, because it was still being tested at the time of our review, we were not able to determine its effectiveness.

We are making 10 recommendations to improve the Visa Security Program. ICE concurred with each of the recommendations.

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DHS OIG – U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Worksite Enforcement Administrative Inspection Process

February 27, 2014 Comments off

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Worksite Enforcement Administrative Inspection Process (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of Inspector General

Generally, ICE’s worksite enforcement administrative inspection process met the requirements of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. However, ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations directorate has not adequately monitored or evaluated the performance or outcomes of implementing its administrative inspection process through the worksite enforcement strategy. Specifically, ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations’ headquarters did not adequately oversee the field offices to ensure that they were consistent in issuing warnings and fines, and some field offices issued significantly more warnings than fines. The directorate also negotiated fines with employers, in some cases substantially reducing the amounts. Homeland Security Investigations’ inconsistent implementation of the administrative inspection process, plus the reduction of fines, may have hindered its mission to prevent or deter employers from violating immigration laws. The directorate has not analyzed the effect of these differences in implementation or sufficiently determined whether implementation has improved compliance. In addition, field offices did not always document their actions adequately and did not maintain accurate and up-to-date administrative inspection data, making it more difficult to verify employers’ compliance. As a result, ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations directorate may have difficulty fully analyzing the impact of its administrative inspection process through the worksite enforcement strategy. Because it is able to inspect only a small percentage of employers, the Homeland Security Investigations directorate should maximize the value of each administrative inspection by ensuring that it conducts the inspection process effectively.

Deportation of Parents of U.S.-Born Citizens

April 4, 2012 Comments off

Deportation of Parents of U.S.-Born Citizens: Fiscal Year 2011 Report to Congress — Second Semi-Annual Report (PDF)
Source: U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (DHS; via Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service)

The data provided in this report are based on a reporting period of January 1, 2011, through June 30, 2011.

During the reporting period, ICE sought orders of deportation, exclusion, or removal in the cases of 39,918 aliens who claimed to have at least 1 USC child. ICE removed 46,486 aliens who claimed at least 1 USC child.

CBP, ICE Release Report on 2011 Counterfeit Seizures

January 14, 2012 Comments off

CBP, ICE Release Report on 2011 Counterfeit Seizures
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Theft of American intellectual property is a serious crime, and U.S. Customs and Border Protection and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced today that their vigorous, ongoing efforts to protect America from the trade in counterfeit and pirated goods during fiscal year 2011 resulted in 24,792 seizures, a 24 percent increase over 2010.

Many fake goods seriously threaten the health and safety of American consumers and our national security. With this in mind, CBP and ICE continued to step up enforcement against these dangerous products resulting in a 44 percent increase in the number of seizures of health and safety products that could have harmed Americans. The value of these seizures soared to more than $60 million due to increases in pharmaceutical and perfume seizures.

Despite the significant increase in the number of seizures, the domestic value for seizures in fiscal year 2011 decreased by five percent to $178.9 million and the manufacturer’s suggested retail price declined slightly to $1.1 billion. This is primarily due to a shift toward using international mail, express courier and consolidated shipping services to import counterfeit and pirated goods.

“The growth of websites selling counterfeit goods directly to consumers is one reason why CBP and ICE have seen a significant increase in the number of seizures at mail and express courier facilities,” said Acting CBP Commissioner David V. Aguilar. “Although these websites may have low prices, what they do not tell consumers is that the true costs to our nation and consumers include lost jobs, stolen business profits, threats to our national security, and a serious risk of injury to consumers.”

+ Full Report (PDF)

Secure Communities: Quarterly Report — Fiscal Year 2011 First Quarter Report to Congress

May 16, 2011 Comments off

Secure Communities: Quarterly Report — Fiscal Year 2011 First Quarter Report to Congress (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security

This quarterly report describes how U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) utilized technology to enhance enforcement activities, as well as how resources and activities were focused on efforts to identify and remove criminal aliens from the United States during the first quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2011. These efforts are strategically planned around and focused on the following three goals: identification, prioritization, and transformation. The core activities discussed in this report are Secure Communities Automated Biometric Identification System (IDENT)/Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS) interoperability, criminal alien enforcement, and information technology (IT) development. This executive summary ties these core strategies to activities.

Table — List of Deaths in ICE Custody: October 2003 – February 24, 2011

March 8, 2011 Comments off

Table — List of Deaths in ICE Custody: October 2003 – February 24, 2011 (PDF)
Source: U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (DHS)
Includes alien name, sex, date of birth, country of birth, date of death, location of death, location of last detention, facility type, final cause of death.

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