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CDC Grand Rounds: Preventing Youth Violence

February 27, 2015 Comments off

CDC Grand Rounds: Preventing Youth Violence
Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (CDC)

Youth violence occurs when persons aged 10–24 years, as victims, offenders, or witnesses, are involved in the intentional use of physical force or power to threaten or harm others. Youth violence typically involves young persons hurting other young persons and can take different forms. Examples include fights, bullying, threats with weapons, and gang-related violence. Different forms of youth violence can also vary in the harm that results and can include physical harm, such as injuries or death, as well as psychological harm. Youth violence is a significant public health problem with serious and lasting effects on the physical, mental, and social health of youth. In 2013, 4,481 youths aged 10–24 years (6.9 per 100,000) were homicide victims (1). Homicide is the third leading cause of death among persons aged 10–24 years (after unintentional injuries and suicide) and is responsible for more deaths in this age group than the next seven leading causes of death combined (Figure) (1). Males and racial/ethnic minorities experience the greatest burden of youth violence. Rates of homicide deaths are approximately six times higher among males aged 10–24 years (11.7 per 100,000) than among females (2.0). Rates among non-Hispanic black youths (27.6 per 100,000) and Hispanic youths (6.3) are 13 and three times higher, respectively, than among non-Hispanic white youths (2.1) (1). The number of young persons who are physically harmed by violence is more than 100 times higher than the number killed. In 2013, an estimated 547,260 youths aged 10–24 years (847 per 100,000) were treated in U.S. emergency departments for nonfatal physical assault–related injuries (1)

Identity Theft Tops FTC’s Consumer Complaint Categories Again in 2014

February 27, 2015 Comments off

Identity Theft Tops FTC’s Consumer Complaint Categories Again in 2014
Source: Federal Trade Commission

Identity theft topped the Federal Trade Commission’s national ranking of consumer complaints for the 15th consecutive year, while the agency also recorded a large increase in the number of complaints about so-called “imposter” scams, according to the FTC’s 2014 Consumer Sentinel Network Data Book, which was released today.

Imposter scams – in which con artists impersonate government officials or others – moved into third place on the list of consumer complaints, entering the top three complaint categories for the first time. The increase in imposter scams was led by a sharp jump in complaints about IRS and other government imposter scams. Debt collection held steady as the second-most-reported complaint.

Report on Cybersecurity Practices

February 26, 2015 Comments off

Report on Cybersecurity Practices (PDF)
Source: Financial Industry Regulatory Authority

Like many organizations in the financial services and other sectors, broker-dealers (firms) are the target of cyberattacks. The frequency and sophistication of these attacks is increasing and individual broker-dealers, and the industry as a whole, must make responding to these threats a high priority.

This report is intended to assist firms in that effort. Based on FINRA’s 2014 targeted examination of firms and other related initiatives, the report presents FINRA’s latest work in this critical area. Given the rapidly evolving nature and pervasiveness of cyberattacks, it is unlikely to be our last.

A variety of factors are driving firms’ exposure to cybersecurity threats. The interplay between advances in technology, changes in firms’ business models, and changes in how firms and their customers use technology create vulnerabilities in firms’ information technology systems. For example, firms’ Web-based activities can create opportunities for attackers to disrupt or gain access to firm and customer information. Similarly, employees and customers are using mobile devices to access information at broker-dealers that create a variety of new avenues for attack

The landscape of threat actors includes cybercriminals whose objective may be to steal money or information for commercial gain, nation states that may acquire information to advance national objectives, and hacktivists whose objectives may be to disrupt and embarrass an entity. Attackers, and the tools available to them, are increasingly sophisticated. Insiders, too, can pose significant threats.

This report presents an approach to cybersecurity grounded in risk management to address these threats. It identifies principles and effective practices for firms to consider, while recognizing that there is no one-size-fits-all approach to cybersecurity.

The Challenge of Preventing Browser-Borne Malware

February 26, 2015 Comments off

The Challenge of Preventing Browser-Borne Malware (PDF)
Source: Ponemon Institute

We surveyed 645 IT and IT security practitioners who are familiar and involved in their company’s efforts to detect and contain malware. Survey participants were from U.S. businesses with an average of more than 14,000 employees. All of the organizations represented in this research have built a multilayer defense-in-depth architecture in an effort to prevent these types of attacks.

Despite having such technologies in place, over the past 12 months, these organizations experienced an average of 51 security breaches because of a failure in malware detection technology. The findings also reveal the average cost to respond to and remediate just one security breach because of a failure in malware detection technology is approximately $62,000. This means organizations could have spent an average of $3.2 million to remediate a security breach caused by web-borne malware.

2014 Fifth Annual Study on Medical Identity Theft

February 24, 2015 Comments off

2014 Fifth Annual Study on Medical Identity Theft
Source: Medical Identity Fraud Alliance

The 2014 Fifth Annual Study on Medical Identity Theft measures the prevalence, extent and impact of medical identity theft to consumers and the healthcare industry in the United States. The study was sponsored by the Medical Identity Fraud Alliance (MIFA) with support from MIFA Founding Member companies Kaiser Permanente, ID Experts Corporation, Experian Data Breach Resolution and Identity Finder, LLC, and conducted by the Ponemon Institute.

The incidence of medical identity theft continues to rise. This most recent report shows that it has nearly doubled since the first study five years ago. In 2014, there were almost 500,000 more victims than in 2013.

The out-of-pockets costs to victims has also grown, with twice as many victims experiencing financial costs to correct their medical identities and deal with the resulting problems.

And victims continue to experience serious risks related to their healthcare as a result of being victimized, such as misdiagnosis, mistreatment and delayed healthcare.

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Child Maltreatment 2013 (Published: January 15, 2015)

February 24, 2015 Comments off

Child Maltreatment 2013
Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children & Families
From email:

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration for Children and Families (ACF) released Child Maltreatment 2013, the 24th in a series of reports designed to provide State-level data from the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS).

Highlights from Child Maltreatment 2013 include the following:

  • From 2009 to 2013, overall rates of victimization declined, from 9.3 to 9.1 per 1,000 children in the population. This resulted in an estimated 23,000 fewer victims in 2013 (679,000) compared with the number of victims in 2009 (702,000).
  • Since 2009, overall rates of children who received a response from child protective services (CPS) increased from 40.3 to 42.9 per 1,000 children in the population. This resulted in an estimated 145,000 additional children who received a CPS response in 2013 (3,188,000) compared to 2009 (3,043,000). States provide possible explanations for the increase in Appendix D, State Commentary.
  • Four-fifths (79.5 percent) of victims experienced neglect, 18 percent experienced physical abuse, 9 percent experienced sexual abuse, and 8.7 percent experienced psychological maltreatment.
  • For 2013, a nationally estimated 1,520 children died of abuse and neglect at a rate of 2.04 children per 100,000 children in the national population.

The Emergence of Cybersecurity Law

February 23, 2015 Comments off

The Emergence of Cybersecurity Law (PDF)
Source: Indiana University Maurer School of Law

This paper examines cyberlaw as a growing field of legal practice and the roles that lawyers play in helping companies respond to cybersecurity threats. Drawing on interviews with lawyers, consultants, and academics knowledgeable in the intersection of law and cybersecurity, as well as a survey of lawyers working in general counsel’s offices, this study examines the broader context of cybersecurity, the current legal framework for data security and related issues, and the ways in which lawyers learn about and involve themselves in cybersecurity issues. These discussions are presented across the paper’s three sections:

  • Cybersecurity and the Law explores the context in which cyberlaw is developing, examining the importance of cybersecurity to companies and corporations and how inside and outside counsel are responding.
  • Legal Developments in Cyberlaw provides an overview of the current state of the legislation, regulations, and other sources of law and policy influencing cybersecurity.
  • How Lawyers Help Meet Cyberthreats examines lawyers’ roles cybersecurity in more detail, including both the tasks they should perform and the tasks they do perform. This section also examines how lawyers are improving their knowledge of cybersecurity.
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