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2014 Catalyst Census: Women Board Directors

January 16, 2015 Comments off

2014 Catalyst Census: Women Board Directors
Source: Catalyst
From press release:

For the first time, Catalyst takes its 2014 Catalyst Census: Women Board Directors global, as the call for gender equality on boards grows worldwide. Created in partnership with The Data Morphosis Group, the new and expanded Census focuses on women’s share of board seats at stock market index companies across three regions and 20 countries, including the United States, Canada, Europe (14 countries), and Asia-Pacific (Australia, Hong Kong, India, and Japan).

Among the findings:

  • North America: Women hold 19.2% of S&P 500 board seats in the United States; and 20.8% of S&P/TSX 60 board seats in Canada.
  • Europe: Women’s share of board seats ranges from 7.9% in Portugal (PSI-20 index) to 18.5% in Germany (DAX index) to 22.8% in the United Kingdom (FTSE 100 index) to 35.5% in Norway (OBX index).
  • Asia-Pacific: Women’s share of board seats ranges from 3.1% in Japan (TOPIX Core 30 index) to 9.5% in India (BSE 200 index) to 19.2% in Australia (S&P/ASX 200 index).

Highlights of women’s earnings in 2013 (December 2014)

January 13, 2015 Comments off

Highlights of women’s earnings in 2013 (PDF)
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

In 2013, women who were full-time wage and salary workers had median usual weekly earnings of $706. On average in 2013, women made 82 percent of the median weekly earnings of male full-time wage and salary workers ($860). In 1979, the first year for which comparable earnings data are available, women earned 62 percent of what men earned.

Life Expectancy at Birth and at Age 65 by Local Areas in England and Wales, 2011–13

January 8, 2015 Comments off

Life Expectancy at Birth and at Age 65 by Local Areas in England and Wales, 2011–13
Source: Office for National Statistics

Key findings

  • In 2011–13, the inequality in life expectancy between the local areas with the highest and lowest figures was greater for newborn baby boys than girls, but slightly greater for women than men at age 65.
  • The inequality in life expectancy between the local areas with the highest and lowest figures increased for newborn baby boys, but reduced for girls between 2007–09 and 2011–13.
  • Life expectancy at birth and at age 65 increased at a faster pace in London, the North East and the North West compared with other regions between 2007–09 and 2011–13.
  • In 2011–13, approximately 32% of local areas in the East, 43% in the South East and 28% in the South West were in the fifth of areas with the highest male life expectancy at birth.
  • In contrast, there was no local area in the North East and Wales in this group. A similar pattern was observed for females.
  • In 2011–13, life expectancy for newborn baby boys was highest in South Cambridgeshire (83.0 years); 8.7 years longer than in Blackpool with the lowest (74.3 years).
  • For newborn baby girls, life expectancy was highest in Chiltern (86.4 years); 6.4 years longer than in Manchester with the lowest (80.0 years).
  • For men at age 65, life expectancy was highest in Harrow (21.1 years) and lowest in Manchester (16.0 years).
  • For women at age 65, life expectancy was highest in Camden (24.0 years) and lowest in Halton (18.8 years).

Raising The Global Ambition for Girls’ Education

January 6, 2015 Comments off

Raising The Global Ambition for Girls’ Education
Source: Brookings Institution

In 1948, the world’s nations came together and agreed that “everyone has a right to education,” boys and girls and rich and poor alike. This vision set forth in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights has been reinforced over the decades and today the girls who still fight to be educated are not cases for charity but actively pursuing what is rightfully theirs. In recent years, girls’ education has also received attention because, in the words of the United Nations, “education is not only a right but a passport to human development.” Evidence has been mounting on the pivotal role that educating a girl or a woman plays in improving health, social, and economic outcomes, not only for herself but her children, family, and community. Educating girls helps improve health: one study published in The Lancet, the world’s leading medical journal, found that increasing girls’ education was responsible for more than half of the reduction in child mortality between 1970 and 2009. The economic benefits are clear: former chief economist at the World Bank and United States Secretary of the Treasury Lawrence Summers concluded that girls’ education “may well be the highest-return investment available in the developing world” due to the benefits women, their families and societies reap. And because women make up a large share of the world’s farmers, improvements in girls’ education also lead to increased agricultural output and productivity.

Overwork and the Slow Convergence in the Gender Gap in Wages

December 30, 2014 Comments off

Overwork and the Slow Convergence in the Gender Gap in Wages
Source: American Sociological Review

Despite rapid changes in women’s educational attainment and continuous labor force experience, convergence in the gender gap in wages slowed in the 1990s and stalled in the 2000s. Using CPS data from 1979 to 2009, we show that convergence in the gender gap in hourly pay over these three decades was attenuated by the increasing prevalence of “overwork” (defined as working 50 or more hours per week) and the rising hourly wage returns to overwork. Because a greater proportion of men engage in overwork, these changes raised men’s wages relative to women’s and exacerbated the gender wage gap by an estimated 10 percent of the total wage gap. This overwork effect was sufficiently large to offset the wage-equalizing effects of the narrowing gender gap in educational attainment and other forms of human capital. The overwork effect on trends in the gender gap in wages was most pronounced in professional and managerial occupations, where long work hours are especially common and the norm of overwork is deeply embedded in organizational practices and occupational cultures. These results illustrate how new ways of organizing work can perpetuate old forms of gender inequality.

FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg’s statement on FDA’s blood donor deferral policy for men who have sex with men

December 24, 2014 Comments off

FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg’s statement on FDA’s blood donor deferral policy for men who have sex with men
Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is a science-based regulatory agency that works to protect and promote the public health. In this role, it is our responsibility to regulate the blood supply and to help ensure its continued safety for the patients who receive these life-saving products.

Over the past several years, in collaboration with other government agencies, the FDA has carefully examined and considered the available scientific evidence relevant to its blood donor deferral policy for men who have sex with men, including the results of several recently completed scientific studies and recent epidemiologic data. Following this review, and taking into account the recommendations of advisory committees to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the FDA, the agency will take the necessary steps to recommend a change to the blood donor deferral period for men who have sex with men from indefinite deferral to one year since the last sexual contact.

This recommended change is consistent with the recommendation of an independent expert advisory panel the HHS Advisory Committee on Blood and Tissue Safety and Availability, and will better align the deferral period with that of other men and women at increased risk for HIV infection. Additionally, in collaboration with the NIH’s National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the FDA has already taken steps to implement a national blood surveillance system that will help the agency monitor the effect of a policy change and further help to ensure the continued safety of the blood supply.

Fenwick & West Releases Trends in Corporate Governance, Gender Diversity Comparing Silicon Valley 150 and S&P 100

December 23, 2014 Comments off

Fenwick & West Releases Trends in Corporate Governance, Gender Diversity Comparing Silicon Valley 150 and S&P 100
Source: Fenwick & West

Fenwick & West, one of the nation’s premier law firms serving technology, venture capital and life sciences companies, today released its Corporate Governance Survey and its adjunct Gender Diversity Survey. The surveys cover more than a decade of governance and leadership trends comparing companies in the S&P 100 and their relatively smaller and younger counterparts in the Silicon Valley 150 (SV 150), which are concentrated in the technology and life sciences industries.

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