Archive

Archive for the ‘gender and sexuality’ Category

American Driving Survey: Methodology and Year One Results, May 2013 – May 2014

May 22, 2015 Comments off

American Driving Survey: Methodology and Year One Results, May 2013 – May 2014
Source: AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety/Urban Institute

On behalf of the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, the Urban Institute conducts a continuous survey to measure the driving behavior of the American public. The American Driving Survey is a national survey of persons 16 and over who drive of light vehicles (autos, SUVs, trucks) and reside in households with landline telephone service and/or cellular telephones. The survey commenced in May 2013 and is ongoing. The results of the first year’s data collection are presented in this report.

The Rights Of LGBTI People In The European Union

May 22, 2015 Comments off

The Rights Of LGBTI People In The European Union
Source: European Parliamentary Research Service

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence.

Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and access to goods and services, leaving LGBTI people particularly vulnerable in these areas.

Perspectives on Sexual Health and Function of Recent Male Combat Veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan

May 15, 2015 Comments off

Perspectives on Sexual Health and Function of Recent Male Combat Veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan
Source: Sexual Medicine

Background
U.S. veterans of recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan may be at greater risk for sexual dysfunction due to injuries, mental health conditions, medications used to treat those conditions, and psychosocial factors.

Objective
To explore the perceptions of recent Veterans about sexual health and dysfunction, contributing factors, its impact and solutions.

Design
Qualitative study.

Participants
Eight men who screened positive for sexual dysfunction at initial presentation to a postdeployment clinic at a Veterans Affairs medical center.

Approach
Patients who screened positive for sexual dysfunction and indicated an interest in participating were contacted and scheduled for an in-person private interview with a researcher. Interviews were semistructured, utilizing open-ended and follow-up probe questions to elicit the individual’s perspective about sexual dysfunction and its cause, impact and solutions. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed for themes.

Key Results
These heterosexual men discussed a range of sexual dysfunction in their activities including lack of desire, erectile dysfunction, delayed orgasm, premature ejaculation, and distraction. They also discussed the importance of setting or context and changes over time to their sexual health and function. The men shared their ideas about contributory factors, including normal aging, medication side effects, injury and a possible role for combat deployment more generally. Reported solutions for sexual dysfunction included medications, herbal remedies, and new positions and approaches to sexual activity. Participants reported discussing sexual dysfunction with their health-care providers and what was helpful. Finally, the men expressed in their own words the significant impact of sexual dysfunction on their self-perception, their partners, and their relationships.

Conclusions
Sexual dysfunction in recent combat veterans can have important negative effects on their health and relationships. Our findings elucidate perceived contributory factors and preferred solutions, which can be applied by health-care providers to improve the management of sexual dysfunction in these patients.

Federal and State Standards for “Essential Community Providers” under the ACA and Implications for Women’s Health

May 13, 2015 Comments off

Federal and State Standards for “Essential Community Providers” under the ACA and Implications for Women’s Health
Source: Kaiser Family Foundation

Millions of previously uninsured Americans have gained access to health coverage through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Marketplace plans. The provider networks of the Marketplace plans determine where enrollees can seek medical care. Many of these individuals have received their care for years from safety-net providers, such as community health centers and family planning clinics. Recognizing the important role these providers play in promoting continuity of care as people transition from being uninsured and relying on safety net clinics to private insurance, and to meet the increased demand for medical care in underserved communities, Congress established general requirements to assure that these providers have the opportunity to participate in the health plans that are offered through the Marketplaces. These safety net clinics and hospitals are referred to as Essential Community Providers (ECPs), and the ACA specifically requires that Qualified Health Plans available through the federal or state insurance Marketplaces have a “sufficient number and geographic distribution of ECPs, where available, to ensure reasonable and timely access to a broad range of such providers for low-income, medically underserved individuals in the plan’s service area.”1 Because both the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and state regulators can have the authority to decide how to implement the broad ECP standard, there is considerable variation across the country in both the categories of providers included as ECPs as well as the standards required for inclusion in plan networks. This brief reviews the definition of ECP, examines the federal and state rules that govern the extent to which plans must include these providers in their networks, identifies the variation from state to state, and discusses the particular importance of these rules and providers for women’s access to care.

700,000 Americans Are Married to a Same-sex Spouse, Married Same-sex Couples More Likely to Raise Adopted, Foster Children and Are More Economically Secure, New Reports Show

May 8, 2015 Comments off

700,000 Americans Are Married to a Same-sex Spouse, Married Same-sex Couples More Likely to Raise Adopted, Foster Children and Are More Economically Secure, New Reports Show
Source: Williams Institute (UCLA School of Law)

According to Williams Institute Research Director Gary Gates’ assessment of a new preliminary estimate from Gallup, the number of legally married same-sex couples in the United States has more than doubled over the last year. The new figures suggest that, as of February 2015, more than 700,000 Americans are part of a married same-sex couple, implying that there are now about 350,000 married same-sex couples in the country. Estimates from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey had the figure at 130,000.

Two new research reports released today and authored by Gates show that same-sex couples, particularly married ones, are more likely to be raising adopted or foster children than their different-sex counterparts. The reports also found that same-sex couples with children have a lower median annual income than different-sex couples with kids but, like different-sex couples, married same-sex couples are more economically secure.

New Study Examines Human Services for Low-Income and At-Risk LGBT Populations

May 8, 2015 Comments off

New Study Examines Human Services for Low-Income and At-Risk LGBT Populations
Source: Williams Institute (UCLA School of Law) and Mathematica

Despite social and legal progress for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people in the United States, much about low-income and at-risk LGBT individuals and their participation in federal human service programs remains unknown. In fact, data suggest LGBT people may be disproportionately at risk of poor outcomes related to economic security and social well-being, compared to the general population.

To address this knowledge gap, Mathematica, in partnership with the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law, conducted an assessment for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation. The project aims to help identify the current knowledge base and priorities for future research and, ultimately, strengthen services for low-income and at-risk LGBT people.

A report and related issue brief look at LGBT populations’ characteristics and interactions with human services and identify data gaps. The project focused on (1) income support and self-sufficiency programs for low-income families, (2) child welfare programs, and (3) programs for youth—especially services funded by ACF (assistance for runaway and homeless youth, and sexual health education for adolescents). Three additional briefs delve into recommendations for future research in these key

Assessment of the Healthcare Needs and Barriers to VA Use Experienced by Women Veterans: Findings From the National Survey of Women Veterans

May 8, 2015 Comments off

Assessment of the Healthcare Needs and Barriers to VA Use Experienced by Women Veterans: Findings From the National Survey of Women Veterans
Source: Medical Care

Background:
Prior regional studies of women Veterans identified barriers to Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare use. However, these studies do not reflect the demographic profile of women Veterans nationally, recent advances in VA women’s healthcare, and the national context of expanded healthcare alternatives.

Objective:
To characterize health, VA perceptions, barriers, healthcare delivery preferences, and reasons for VA or non-VA healthcare use in a national women Veteran sample.

Methods:
Cross-sectional, population-based 2008–2009 National Survey of Women Veterans (n=3611).

Results:
VA users had worse physical and mental health than non–VA-only users and healthcare nonusers. Older women Veterans had worse physical health, whereas younger groups had worse mental health. Healthcare use was highest for dual users, followed by VA-only users, but did not differ by age group. Healthcare nonusers were most likely to lack a regular source for healthcare. Perceptions of VA care quality and sex-appropriateness were highest for VA-only, followed by dual, then non–VA-only users. VA perceptions were guided by personal experience for 90% of VA users, versus media or other secondhand sources for 70% of other groups. Non–VA-only users and healthcare nonusers had more knowledge gaps about VA and misperceptions about VA eligibility and services; non–VA-only users more likely encountered VA enrollment barriers.

Conclusions:
Many nonusers had healthcare needs that were not met. Positive VA perceptions by women with first-hand VA experience, contrasted with VA knowledge gaps by those without such exposure, suggests the need for more education about available VA healthcare services. VA planning should account for mental health needs and healthcare use by younger women Veterans.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,053 other followers