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Corporate Welfare at Industry Canada since John Diefenbaker

August 19, 2013 Comments off

Corporate Welfare at Industry Canada since John Diefenbaker
Source: Fraser Institute

Between April 1, 1961 and March 31, 2012, and adjusted for inflation to 2012 dollars, Industry Canada disbursed $34.3 billion through to other governments, foundations, and businesses. $22.1 billion of that money was disbursed to business, $8.8 billion given in grants, and $13.3 billion provided in loans.

Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. received the most money over the decades: almost $3.3 billion via 75 disbursements. Bombardier and De Havilland were the second and third largest recipients, each receiving disbursements worth $1.1 billion over the years.

Most of Canada’s largest companies (ranked by the number of employees), do not take financial assistance from Industry Canada. The top three employers—Onex Corp. (246,000 employees), George Weston Ltd. (155,000 employees), and Loblaw Companies (135,000 employees)—received no Industry Canada handouts in the 51 years surveyed.

Peer-reviewed research does not support many claims advanced by federal politicians and other proponents of such subsidies: that corporate welfare is responsible for economic growth or job creation. In fact, the companies with the highest employee counts—most of which do not take subsidies—are real-world examples of companies that have not needed taxpayer assistance to create jobs.

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State of Customer Relationship Management: the Canadian Report 2010

March 23, 2011 Comments off

State of Customer Relationship Management: the Canadian Report 2010 (PDF)
Source: Industry Canada

In today’s complex business environment, the extent to which manufacturing and services firms can effectively attract and retain profitable customers is a key determinant of their competitiveness. Customer relationship management (CRM) is a cross-functional strategic process used by firms to manage and develop their interactions with current and potential customers.

CRM is an innovation- and technology-driven process. To efficiently and effectively respond to rapid changes in customer demand, firms must have access to timely and accurate information regarding their current and potential customers. The integration of CRM technology into a greater CRM strategy provides firms with appropriate tools to respond to this challenge and the potential to enhance business operations throughout the sales cycle.

Across industry sectors, firms are prioritizing their investment in CRM — through both in-house and outsourcing investment — while integrating CRM with their commercialisation strategies to develop their revenue streams through new and existing markets. It is important that firms and policy makers have the ability to access and utilize strategic information and performance indicators enabling them to focus on CRM initiatives and strategies that deliver business benefits.

Industry Canada has partnered with Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters (CME), Canadian Services Coalition (CSC), an affiliate of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce (CCC), Canadian Advanced Technology Alliance (CATA), and the Program for International Competitiveness at McGill University’s Desautels Faculty of Management to review this valuable core business function. By collecting insights from industry, academia and international research organizations, and using economic analysis conducted by Industry Canada, this industry-academia-government partnership has produced a complete user/service profile of CRM in Canada, summarized here in this report. This unique analysis is intended to help Canadian Business executives and policy markers enhance their understanding of current market trends, the latest key performance indicators (KPI), and best practices in CRM that improve domestic and international competitiveness across industries.

Canada — Review of Federal Support to Research and Development: Expert Panel Consultation Paper

March 15, 2011 Comments off

Review of Federal Support to Research and Development: Expert Panel Consultation Paper (PDF)
Source: Industry Canada

Canada’s ability to prosper in this context, filled with opportunity and challenge, rests on a capacity to improve productivity and business innovation – “new or better ways of doing valued things.”

However, there is some evidence to suggest that Canada is not well positioned to be an innovation leader. In-depth analyses of the Canadian economy’s weak performance in business innovation and productivity growth indicate that Canadian BERD (Business Expenditures on R&D) intensity – a key indicator of innovation activity – is lagging significantly behind comparator countries.

The Canadian economy’s relatively weak BERD intensity in turn influences the country’s rate of productivity growth. Reflective of a long-standing problem, Canada’s annual growth rate of labour productivity averaged 0.6 percent for the 2000-2009 period, which is less than half the average of 1.5 percent among member countries of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). In addition, relative labour productivity in Canada’s business sector has fallen from approximately 93 percent of the United States (US) level in 1984 to approximately 71 percent in 2009 – a quarter-century of relative decline that cannot be explained by temporary or one-off factors.

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