Archive

Archive for the ‘Hispanics’ Category

Report — More Hispanics Earning Bachelor’s Degrees in Physical Sciences and Engineering

December 9, 2014 Comments off

More Hispanics Earning Bachelor’s Degrees in Physical Sciences and Engineering
Source: American Institute of Physics

A new report from the American Institute of Physics (AIP) Statistical Research Center has found that the number of Hispanic students receiving bachelor’s degrees in the physical sciences and engineering has increased over the last decade or so, passing 10,000 degrees per year for the first time in 2012. The overall number of U.S. students receiving degrees in those fields also increased over the same time, but it increased faster among Hispanics.

From 2002 to 2012, the number of Hispanics earning bachelor’s degrees in the physical sciences rose 78 percent compared to an overall increase of 47 percent in all U.S. bachelor’s degrees earned in those same fields. Similarly, Hispanics earning bachelor’s degrees in engineering rose 64 percent, compared to just a 34 percent increase in the overall population.

About these ads

Listen Up! Hispanic Consumers and Music

December 1, 2014 Comments off

Listen Up! Hispanic Consumers and Music
Source: Nielsen

Music is a key component of Hispanic life and Hispanics are among the most enthusiastic consumers of music across a variety of genres regardless of acculturation level. Having roots in Mexico and various countries across Central America, South America and the Caribbean, Hispanics are diverse, speak multiple languages, and straddle multiple cultures. There is no single narrative that applies to those who identify themselves as Hispanic. Some are recent immigrants who speak only Spanish, some are descendants of families who immigrated generations ago and speak only English, and some speak Spanish and English with equal ease.

One thing that binds Hispanics together is a passion for music.

Free registration required.

Categories: Hispanics, music, Nielsen

The Personal News Cycle: A focus on African American and Hispanic news consumers

October 8, 2014 Comments off

The Personal News Cycle: A focus on African American and Hispanic news consumers
Source: American Press Institute

The predicted digital divide, in which people of color would be left behind in the use of technology, is not playing out as many of those forecasting the digital future anticipated, at least not when it comes to news, according to a new survey released today.

The two largest minority groups in the United States — African Americans and Hispanics — are in many ways using digital technology for news at similar rates as the American population overall. Yet these Americans do not believe that the growth of web and mobile media has fulfilled the promise of more coverage, and more accurate coverage, of underserved ethnic communities. The new survey — the second to be released by the Media Insight Project — was produced in collaboration with the Maynard Institute, New America Media, and the McCormick Foundation.

The new study adds to the growing body of evidence that the digital divide has not materialized as expected when it comes to technology use. The study also adds nuance to our understanding of the means by which people navigate and think about technology, particularly when it comes to news.

Catching Up: Latino Health Coverage Gains and Challenges Under the Affordable Care Act

September 29, 2014 Comments off

Catching Up: Latino Health Coverage Gains and Challenges Under the Affordable Care Act
Source: Commonwealth Fund

For decades, Latinos have had the highest uninsured rates of any racial or ethnic group in the United States. Less than one year after the Affordable Care Act’s health insurance marketplaces opened for enrollment, the overall Latino uninsured rate dropped from 36 percent to 23 percent, according to the Commonwealth Fund Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey, conducted April 9 to June 2, 2014. However, the high uninsured rate among Latinos in states that had not expanded their Medicaid program at the time of the survey—33 percent—remained statistically unchanged. These states are home to about 20 million Latinos, the majority of whom live in Texas and Florida.

Violent Victimization In New And Established Hispanic Areas, 2007–2010

September 26, 2014 Comments off

Violent Victimization In New And Established Hispanic Areas, 2007–2010
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Examines violent victimization rates by victims’ race and ethnicity within four Hispanic areas from 2007 to 2010. Hispanic areas are classified based on their historical Hispanic population and the growth in their Hispanic population between 1980 and 2001. This includes—

  • established slow growth areas
  • established fast growth areas
  • new emerging Hispanic areas
  • small Hispanic areas.

The report describes Hispanic, white, and black violent victimization rates in each area by age and sex.

Highlights:

  • From 1980 to 2010, the Hispanic population increased 246%, compared to 44% for non-Hispanic blacks and 9% for non-Hispanic whites.
  • From 2007 to 2010, new Hispanic areas had a lower overall rate of violent victimization compared to small Hispanic areas that had relatively little growth in Hispanic populations.
  • Unlike blacks and whites, Hispanics experienced higher rates of violent victimization in new Hispanic metropolitan areas (26 per 1,000) than in other areas (16 to 20 per 1,000).
  • Hispanics ages 18 to 34 exhibited the largest variation in victimization rates by type of area. Those in new Hispanic areas experienced violence at higher rates than those in established and small Hispanic areas.
  • Among all age groups, new Hispanic areas did not show statistically significant higher rates of violent victimization for non-Hispanic white and black residents.

Facts for Features: Hispanic Heritage Month 2014: Sept. 15–Oct. 15

September 12, 2014 Comments off

Facts for Features: Hispanic Heritage Month 2014: Sept. 15–Oct. 15
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

In September 1968, Congress authorized President Lyndon B. Johnson to proclaim National Hispanic Heritage Week, observed during the week that included Sept. 15 and Sept. 16. Congress expanded the observance in 1989 to a monthlong celebration (Sept. 15 – Oct. 15) of the culture and traditions of those who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico and the Spanish-speaking nations of Central America, South America and the Caribbean.

Sept. 15 is the starting point for the celebration because it is the anniversary of independence of five Latin American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on Sept. 16 and Sept. 18, respectively.

The residential segregation of detailed Hispanic and Asian groups in the United States: 1980-2010

September 11, 2014 Comments off

The residential segregation of detailed Hispanic and Asian groups in the United States: 1980-2010
Source: Demographic Research

Background:
Racial and ethnic diversity continues to grow in communities across the United States, raising questions about the extent to which different ethnic groups will become residentially integrated.

Objective:
While a number of studies have examined the residential patterns of pan-ethnic groups, our goal is to examine the segregation of several Asian and Hispanic ethnic groups – Cubans, Dominicans, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Salvadorans, Asian Indians, Chinese, Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese. We gauge the segregation of each group from several alternative reference groups using two measures over the 1980 to 2010 period.

Results:
We find that the dissimilarity of Hispanics and Asians from other groups generally held steady or declined, though, because most Hispanic and Asian groups are growing, interaction with Whites also often declined. Our analyses also indicate that pan-ethnic segregation indexes do not always capture the experience of specific groups. Among Hispanics, Mexicans are typically less residentially segregated (as measured using the dissimilarity index) from Whites, Blacks, Asians, and other Hispanics than are other Hispanic-origin groups. Among Asian ethnic groups, Japanese and Filipinos tend to have lower levels of dissimilarity from Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics than other Asian groups. Examining different dimensions of segregation also indicates that dissimilarity scores alone often do not capture to what extent various ethnic groups are actually sharing neighborhoods with each other. Finally, color lines vary across groups in some important ways, even as the dominant trend has been toward reduced racial and ethnic residential segregation over time.

Conclusions:
The overarching trend is that ethnic groups are becoming more residentially integrated, suggestive of assimilation, though there is significant variation across ethnic groups.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 987 other followers