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Annual Energy Outlook 2015

April 15, 2015 Comments off

Annual Energy Outlook 2015
Source: Energy Information Administration

Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2015 (AEO2015) focus on the factors expected to shape U.S. energy markets through 2040. The projections provide a basis for examination and discussion of energy market trends and serve as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in U.S. energy policies, rules, and regulations, as well as the potential role of advanced technologies.

Top 100 U.S. Oil and Gas Fields

April 7, 2015 Comments off

Top 100 U.S. Oil and Gas Fields (PDF)
Source: Energy Information Administration

This supplement to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves, 2013 ranks the 100 largest U.S. oil and gas fields by their estimated 2013 proved reserves.

Hat tip: INFOdocket

OPEC Revenues Fact Sheet — OPEC (excluding Iran) net oil export revenues

April 1, 2015 Comments off

OPEC (excluding Iran) net oil export revenues
Source: Energy Information Administration

For 2014, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates that, excluding Iran, members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) earned about $730 billion in net oil export revenues (unadjusted for inflation). This represents an 11% decline from the $824 billion earned in 2013, largely because of the decline in average annual crude oil prices, and to a lesser extent from decreases in the amount of OPEC net oil exports. This was the lowest earnings for the group since 2010.

Country Analysis Brief: Angola

March 23, 2015 Comments off

Country Analysis Brief: Angola
Source: Energy Information Administration

Angola is the second-largest oil producer in sub-Saharan Africa, behind Nigeria. The country experienced an oil production boom between 2002 and 2008 as production started at several deepwater fields. In 2007, Angola became a member of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC).

Country Analysis Brief: Ecuador

March 19, 2015 Comments off

Country Analysis Brief: Ecuador
Source: Energy Information Administration

In Ecuador, the oil sector accounts for more than half of the country’s export earnings and approximately two-fifths of public sector revenues.1 Resource nationalism and debates about the economic, strategic, and environmental implications of oil sector development are prominent issues in the politics of Ecuador and the policies of its government. Ecuador is the smallest producer in the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and it produced 556,000 barrels per day (bbl/d) of petroleum and other liquids in 2014, of which crude oil production was 555,000 bbl/d. A lack of sufficient domestic refining capacity to meet local demand has forced Ecuador to import refined products, limiting net oil revenue.

Direct Federal Financial Interventions and Subsidies in Energy in Fiscal Year 2013

March 17, 2015 Comments off

Direct Federal Financial Interventions and Subsidies in Energy in Fiscal Year 2013
Source: Energy Information Administration

This report responds to a September 2014 request to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) from U.S. Representative Fred Upton, Chairman of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, and U.S. Representative Ed Whitfield, Chairman of its Subcommittee on Energy and Power, for an update reflecting Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 data of two earlier EIA reports on direct federal financial interventions and subsidies in energy markets covering FY 2007 and FY 2010.

The total value of direct federal financial interventions and subsidies in energy markets decreased nearly 25% between FYs 2010 and 2013, declining from $38.0 billion to $29.3 billion.

Conservation and end-use subsidies (excluding LIHEAP) experienced a substantial decline in both absolute and percentage terms between FY 2010 and FY 2013, declining from $10.2 billion to $4.8 billion.

Drivers of U.S. Household Energy Consumption, 1980-2009

March 3, 2015 Comments off

Drivers of U.S. Household Energy Consumption, 1980-2009
Source: Energy Information Administration

In 2012, the residential sector accounted for 21% of total primary energy consumption and about 20% of carbon dioxide emissions in the United States (computed from EIA 2013). Because of the impacts of residential sector energy use on the environment and the economy, this study was undertaken to help provide a better understanding of the factors affecting energy consumption in this sector. The analysis is based on the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) residential energy consumption surveys (RECS) 1980-2009.

According to RECS, U.S. households used 10.2 quadrillion Btu (quad) of site energy in 2009. During the 1980-2009 time period, household site energy increased by 0.9 quads or 8.9%—an average annual growth of 0.3%. Over the same period, the number of households increased by 33.0% and total floor space by 52.0%. This is equivalent to an average annual growth of 1.1% and 1.8%, respectively. As a result, the aggregate energy intensity per household and per square foot declined by 24.2% and 43.1%, respectively.

The change in aggregate energy intensity was affected by other factors such as structural changes and fluctuation in weather. We applied decomposition techniques to separate the effects of these factors on aggregate energy intensity. More specifically, our decomposition identified four main categories affecting energy use: activity, structural changes, intensity, and weather effects.

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