Archive

Archive for the ‘United Kingdom’ Category

Increased Use of Digital Technologies Could Add $1.36 Trillion to World’s Top 10 Economies in 2020, According to New Study from Accenture

April 13, 2015 Comments off

Increased Use of Digital Technologies Could Add $1.36 Trillion to World’s Top 10 Economies in 2020, According to New Study from Accenture
Source: Accenture

The increased use of digital technologies could boost productivity for the world’s top 10 economies and add US$1.36 trillion to their total economic output in 2020, according to a new study by Accenture (NYSE: ACN). The study is based on the Accenture Digital Density Index, a tool that helps companies make better strategic investments based on granular measures of digital performance.

The Accenture Digital Density Index measures the extent to which digital technologies penetrate a country’s businesses and economy. A country’s “digital density” is determined by a scorecard comprising over 50 indicators, such as the volume of transactions conducted online, the use of cloud or other technologies to streamline processes, the pervasiveness of technology skills in a company, or an economy’s acceptance of new digitally driven business models.

At its broadest level, the Index reveals that a ten point improvement in digital density (on a 100-point scale) over five years would lift GDP growth rates in advanced economies by 0.25 percentage points, and by 0.5 percentage point in emerging economies. That would give the U.S. an uplift to GDP of US$365 billion in 2020. Emerging economies, such as Brazil, India and China could see rises of between $97 billion and $418 billion.

Sexual orientation discrimination in the United Kingdom’s labour market: A field experiment

April 10, 2015 Comments off

Sexual orientation discrimination in the United Kingdom’s labour market: A field experiment (PDF)
Source: Human Relations

Deviations from heteronormativity affect labour market dynamics. Hierarchies of sexual orientation can result in job dismissals, wage discrimination and the failure to promote gay and lesbian individuals to top ranks. In this article, I report on a field experiment (144 jobseekers and their correspondence with 5549 firms) that tested the extent to which sexual orientation affects the labour market outcomes of gay and lesbian job-seekers in the United Kingdom. Their minority sexual orientations, as indicated by job-seekers’ participation in gay and lesbian university student unions, negatively affected their workplace prospects. The probability of gay or lesbian applicants receiving an invitation for an interview was 5.0 percent (5.1%) lower than that for heterosexual male or female applicants. In addition, gay men and lesbians received invitations for interviews by firms that paid salaries that were 1.9 percent (1.2%) lower than those paid by firms that invited heterosexual male or female applicants for interviews. In addition, in male- or female-dominated occupations, gay men and lesbians received fewer invitations for interviews than their non-gay and nonlesbian counterparts. Furthermore, gay men and lesbians also received fewer invitations to interview for positions in which masculine or feminine personality traits were highlighted in job applications and at firms that did not provide written equal opportunity standards, suggesting that the level of discrimination depends partly on the personality traits that employers seek and on organization-level hiring policies. I conclude that heteronormative discourse continues to reproduce and negatively affect the labour market prospects of gay men and lesbians.

Assessing the Political Impact of Immigration as the United Kingdom Heads to the Polls

April 9, 2015 Comments off

Assessing the Political Impact of Immigration as the United Kingdom Heads to the Polls
Source: Migration Policy Institute

Immigration has featured early in the opening week of the United Kingdom’s general election campaign, which officially began on March 30, 2015. Prime Minister David Cameron was pressed on the issue in a televised interview and the Labour Party was criticized for producing campaign mugs emblazoned with pledges to control immigration.

As voters head to the polls on May 7, it remains to be seen how central the often-roiled debate over migration will be in what is a deeply unsettled election year. Immigration is a key political issue, brought about through major changes in immigration patterns over the past two decades, significant policy changes that have failed to reassure the public, and the rise as a political force of the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP)—which has pressed for a temporary ban on new immigration. Paradoxically, immigration may have less visibility during the general election, given the issue is now political poison for the major parties.

Above all, this election cycle will determine the next stage in a long-running political fight: the question of the United Kingdom’s continued membership in the European Union and a possible voter referendum on the matter. Immigration and Europe have now become entangled in voters’ minds and it is likely that the issue of free movement within the European Union could be the determining factor for many voters in any such referendum.

This article briefly reviews the politics of immigration in the United Kingdom since 2010 before examining whether immigration will impact the election and exploring how immigration politics will develop in the future, particularly in regard to the United Kingdom’s place in Europe.

UK — National Risk Register for Civil Emergencies – 2015 edition

April 8, 2015 Comments off

National Risk Register for Civil Emergencies – 2015 edition
Source: Cabinet Office

The National Risk Register of Civil Emergencies March 2015 edition has been published and provides an updated government assessment of the likelihood and potential impact of a range of different civil emergency risks (including naturally and accidentally occurring hazards and malicious threats) that may directly affect the UK over the next 5 years. It also provides information on how the UK government and local respondents such as emergency services prepare for these emergencies.

Members of the public, organisations and businesses wishing to be better prepared for emergencies may find the National Risk Register a useful reference document.

4G and 3G mobile broadband research

April 7, 2015 Comments off

4G and 3G mobile broadband research
Source: Ofcom

Overall, 4G networks performed much better than 3G networks in five sample towns and cities tested – Edinburgh, Leeds, London, Newcastle and Poole/Bournemouth – where both 4G and 3G networks have been rolled out.

In these areas, 4G networks delivered an average download speed of 14.7Mbit/s (compared with 5.9Mbit/s on 3G) and took 0.72 seconds to load a web page (compared with 1.04 seconds on 3G).

The research, which collected 120,000 test samples on smartphones, also highlighted variations in performance between the UK’s network operators – EE, O2, Three and Vodafone – across four key measures:

  • Download speed – how quickly data can be transferred from the internet (relevant to downloading files). Download speed is most likely to affect the consumer experience when downloading very large files to a mobile device or when speed is too slow (under 2Mbit/s) to support high capacity video services.
  • Web browsing speed – the time it takes to load a standard web page (relevant to browsing the internet or interacting with apps).
  • Upload speed – the rate at which data can be transferred from the user’s device to the internet (relevant to uploading pictures, videos and other content to social media, for example).
  • Latency – the responsiveness of the network, measuring the delay of transferring data to and from the user’s device (lower latency is important for activities like gaming, video calls and web browsing).

UK — Open Document Format (ODF) guidance

April 2, 2015 Comments off

Open Document Format (ODF) guidance
Source: Cabinet Office and Government Digital Service

The UK government has selected ODF as the standard for editable office documents to be used across government.

The documents in this collection look at the ODF standard and related procurement issues. These include how to make sure applications and services dealing with editable documents are ODF-compliant.

UK — Technical Issues in Charity Law

March 31, 2015 Comments off

Technical Issues in Charity Law
Source: Law Commission of England

This project originated from our Eleventh Programme of Law Reform. Part of the project is a review of the procedures by which charities governed by Royal Charter and by Act of Parliament amend their governing documents. The remainder of the project comprises certain issues arising out of the review of the Charities Act 2006 conducted by Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts regarding:

  • the procedures by which charities change their purposes and the administrative provisions of their governing documents;
  • the application of property cy-près, including the application cy-près of the proceeds of fundraising appeals;
  • the regulation of the acquisition, disposal and mortgage of land by charities;
  • the remuneration of a trustee of a charity for the supply of goods to the charity;
  • the power to award an equitable allowance to a trustee who has obtained an unauthorised profit;
  • the power for trustees to make ex gratia payments out of the funds of the charity;
  • the transfer of assets and liabilities on incorporation and merger, and gifts made by will to charities that have merged;
  • the availability of property held on charitable trust in the insolvency of a trustee;
  • the power of the Charity Commission to require a charity to change its name, and to refuse to register a charity unless it changes its name;
  • the power for the Charity Commission to determine the identity of the trustees of a charity; and
  • certain powers of the Charity Tribunal.
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,053 other followers