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2014 Consumer Insurance Sentiments

September 28, 2014 Comments off

2014 Consumer Insurance Sentiments
Source: Nielsen

Compared with traditional, tangible goods, insurance is somewhat of an anomaly when it comes to the consumer’s purchasing experience. Unlike a car or box of cereal, insurance isn’t something that a consumer can experience through touch or sight. In the insurance world, consumers are primarily limited to making comparisons about a series of “if/then” statements printed on paper. Furthermore, since consumers can’t interact with their policies, they typically don’t show them off or brag about their coverage limits with their friends or family members.

Given the inherent nature of insurance, Nielsen’s Consumers Insurance Sentiments study highlights how auto and residential policyholders tend to buy their insurance and then forget about it. In that respect, it’s not surprising that more than one in four respondents (28%) currently covered indicated that they have been covered by the same primary policy for 15 years or more for each policy type.

Other highlights include:

  • Switching providers is less frequent with age
  • Younger generations are harder to please
  • The purchase rationale for life insurance is changing
  • Older customers may be under-insured
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Local Watch: Where You Live and Its Impact on Your Choices

September 26, 2014 Comments off

Local Watch: Where You Live and Its Impact on Your Choices
Source: Nielsen

There’s never been a time when U.S. consumers have had as much video content to choose from as they do today. But even with myriad options—and more coming online every day—few areas of the media landscape have the power to engage consumers the way local TV does.

Amid a changing landscape of media consumption and consumer habits, the unique nature of local markets stands out as a major differentiator. The choices we make each day about what to watch and what to buy are greatly influenced by our immediate surroundings, our communities, towns and cities.

This quarter we turn our attention to two local markets with distinctive characteristics apart from their geography: San Francisco and Cincinnati.

Free registration required to access report.

Health and Wellness in America: The Consumer Perspective

September 10, 2014 Comments off

Health and Wellness in America: The Consumer Perspective
Source: Nielsen

Health is trending in the U.S. From superfoods like kale to new exercise fads like yoga and CrossFit, healthy habits are on the tip of the American public’s tongue. So with health and wellness going mainstream, have people really changed their habits?

Consumers aspire to better health and healthier eating, but wanting and doing are two different things. More than one-third of American adults are still obese according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And half admit that healthy eating is a challenge, especially in the face of rising food costs.

Despite setbacks, however, the desire to achieve an improved quality of life is driving consumers to pursue specific health and wellness behaviors, such as consuming healthy foods or reading package labels. By identifying unmet consumer nutrient needs, finding foods that address consumers’ health concerns and understanding different consumer segments’ varied habits, retailers and manufacturers can help consumers overcome the obstacles they face when it comes to health and wellness and improve their lifestyles.

E-Commerce: Evolution or Revolution in the Fast-Moving Consumer Goods World?

September 9, 2014 Comments off

E-Commerce: Evolution or Revolution in the Fast-Moving Consumer Goods World?
Source: Nielsen

Across the globe, shoppers are increasingly turning to the web to buy the things they need. Online shopping offers certain conveniences—from delivering your order right to your door to broad selection and low prices—that brick-and-mortar stores can’t. But for certain categories, traditional retail stores still hold the cards.

The most popular e-commerce categories, not surprisingly, are non-consumable—durables and entertainment-related products. Almost half of global respondents in an online survey intend to purchase clothing or make airline or hotel reservations using an online device in the next six months. On the other hand the online market for buying groceries and other consumable products is comparatively smaller. The hands-on buying nature and perishability of these goods limits the usefulness and practicality of buying online.

Nevertheless, the global audience is willing and eager to shop the web. Online purchase intention rates have doubled in three years for 12 of 22 measured categories. While consumable categories will continue to trail non-consumable ones, the frequency of purchasing these products is increasing e-commerce’s appeal. And beyond buying, digital is an increasingly important research and engagement platform.

Free registration required to access report.

Nielsen Study: Significant Overlap Between People Tweeting About TV and Brands

August 10, 2014 Comments off

Nielsen Study: Significant Overlap Between People Tweeting About TV and Brands
Source: Lost Remote/Nielsen

A recently Nielsen study measures the overlap between people who tweet about TV and people who tweet about brands that advertise on TV.

According to the report, 17 million people sent 361 million tweets about TV through April. In the same time period, “17 million people sent 215 million tweets about the approximately 700 brands that Nielsen Social captures.” The purpose of measuring the overlap was to better understand the value of social TV audiences to brands.

Free registration required to access report.

The Bilingual Brain

August 8, 2014 Comments off

The Bilingual Brain
Source: Nielsen

Hispanics and Millennials are two of the fastest growing and increasingly important consumer groups in the U.S. So it’s no surprise that marketers are eager to understand how to connect with these populations. But to engage with those who fall in both groups, Hispanic Millennials, it is imperative to understand the impact of language in order to optimize messaging for this demographic that increasingly identifies as bilingual.

Research has demonstrated that bilingual speakers have a number of cognitive advantages over their monolingual peers; however, the neurological impact of bilingualism on advertising had not yet been explored. Utilizing Nielsen’s proprietary consumer neuroscience technology, Nielsen, Univision and Starcom collaborated to research unarticulated language preferences and their impact on advertising, answering key questions, such as:

  • Does the emerging population of bilingual Millennials respond differently to messaging when it is in Spanish than when it is in English?
  • What are the best ways to reach and connect with Hispanic bilingual Millennials?
  • How does the language of television programming influence how the advertisement is received by the consumer?

The results confirm that language influences how ads are received and introduces the idea that advertising in Spanish offers a unique advantage for brands striving to connect with bilingual Hispanic Millennials.
 

Free registration required.

Consumer Issues — Canada’s Ethnic Minorities Represent a Major Opportunity

July 7, 2014 Comments off

Canada’s Ethnic Minorities Represent a Major Opportunity
Source: Nielsen

Canada’s consumer makeup isn’t what it used to be, and this represents a major opportunity for marketers. Today, Canada is home to 6.8 million foreign-born residents, and that shift is worth noting for any marketer interested in ways to make products and services that cater to Canada’s evolving demographic landscape.

More than one in five Canadians is a foreign-born resident, which is the highest proportion of all G8 countries (the Group of Eight Countries is a forum for the governments of eight of the world’s largest national economies). Before 1971, immigrants from visible minorities made up about 12 percent of the country’s population. Following the last documented wave of new immigrants between 2006 and 2011, almost 80 percent were visible minorities.

Despite this growth in multiculturalism throughout the country, brands and companies have often ignored the opportunity because there’s a perception that it is difficult to reach multicultural consumers. The sheer variety of languages, dialects, consumption patterns, shopping behaviours, brand and product loyalties are seen as a barrier to attracting and engaging with these valuable consumer segments. However, the growing size and potential of these groups means that companies can no longer afford to ignore the upswell.

Free registration required to download report.

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