Archive

Archive for the ‘Australian Bureau of Statistics’ Category

Participation in Sport and Physical Recreation, Australia, 2013-14

February 20, 2015 Comments off

Participation in Sport and Physical Recreation, Australia, 2013-14
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Of the Australian population aged 15 years and over, an estimated 60% (11.1 million people) reported that they had participated in sport and physical recreation at least once during the 12 months prior to the interview in 2013–14, compared with 65% in 2011-12.

Participation generally decreased with age. People aged 15–17 years reported the highest participation rate in sport and physical recreation (74%), while people aged 65 years and over had the lowest (47%). Male and female participation rates were similar, except in the 25-34 age group where participation rates were higher for males (67%) than females (61%).

The highest participation rate for sport and physical recreation was in the Australian Capital Territory (73%), while the other states ranged from 54% in Queensland to 67% in Tasmania.

Walking for exercise was the most popular physical recreational activity, with 19% of people aged 15 years and over walking for exercise at least once in the 12 months prior to interview. Females were more likely to walk for exercise than males (25% and 14% respectively). Fitness and gym were the next most popular activity (17%) again with more females than males participating (19% and 16% respectively). Males were more likely than females to play golf (6.6% and 1.4% respectively) or participate in cycling and BMXing (8.5% and 4.0% respectively).

AU — Psychological Disability, 2012

February 13, 2015 Comments off

Psychological Disability, 2012
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

This publication presents information from the 2012 Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers (SDAC). The SDAC is designed to measure the prevalence of disability in Australia, as well as inform around the socio-economic characteristics and the need for support by people with disability.

In the 2012 SDAC, psychological disability refers to people who reported:

  • A nervous or emotional condition which causes restrictions in everyday activities that has lasted, or is expected to last for six months or more; or
  • A mental illness for which help or supervision is required that has lasted, or is expected to last for six months or more; or
  • A brain injury, including stroke, which results in a mental illness or nervous and emotional condition which causes restrictions in everyday activities.

This publication presents information about people with psychological disability irrespective of whether they also have another disabling condition. The population referred to as people with ‘Disability other than psychological disability’ excludes all people with psychological disability, regardless of whether they also have another disability.

AU — Characteristics of people using mental health services and prescription medication, 2011

December 30, 2014 Comments off

Characteristics of people using mental health services and prescription medication, 2011
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Good mental health is a crucial aspect of good general health, and underpins a productive and inclusive society. Mental health and illness result from the complex interplay of biological, social, psychological, environmental and economic factors at all levels (Endnote 2).

The information in this publication relates to people who actually accessed either an MBS mental health-related service or a PBS subsidised medication in 2011. (For more information, please refer to the Explanatory Notes). As the following graph shows, the age structure of these two groups was quite different.

AU — Work-Related Injuries, Australia, JUL 2013 TO JUN 2014

December 4, 2014 Comments off

Work-Related Injuries, Australia, JUL 2013 TO JUN 2014
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Of the 12.5 million persons who had worked at some time in the last 12 months, 4.3% first experienced their most recent work-related injury or illness during that same period1. The majority (85%) of the 531,800 persons who experienced a work-related injury or illness continued to work in the job where their injury or illness occurred. Approximately 7% had changed jobs and the remaining 8% were not employed in the reference week .

More than half the persons who experienced a work-related injury or illness were males (61%). In 2013-14, 4.9% of males who worked in the last 12 months experienced a work-related injury or illness, down from 5.5% in 2009-10. The proportion of females who experienced a work-related injury or illness in the last 12 months was 3.6%, down from 5.1% in 2009-10.

The occupation groups with the highest rates of people who experienced a work-related injury or illness were ‘Machinery operators and drivers’ (88 per 1,000 employed persons), ‘Community and personal service workers’ (73 per 1,000 employed persons), ‘Technicians and trades workers’ (72 per 1,000 employed persons) and ‘Labourers’ (66 per 1000 employed persons)

Gender Indicators, Australia, August 2014

September 17, 2014 Comments off

Gender Indicators, Australia, August 2014
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

This issue of Gender Indicators, Australia, includes new data on a range of indicators of social interest to men and women. The Economic security, Education, Health, Safety and justice, and Democracy, governance and citizenship domains have been updated with data that has become available since the product was last released in February 2014.

  • Unpublished 2013-14 data from the ABS Labour Force Survey and 2013 data from the Forms of Employment Survey (FoES) have been used to update 14 tables in the Economic security domain, including labour force participation rate, average hours worked per week and the proportion of employees without paid leave entitlements.
  • Six tables in the Education domain have been updated with data from the ABS Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey (AATSIHS), 2012-13; ABS Schools, Australia, 2013; and Graduate Careers Australia, ‘Graduate Salaries’, Melbourne 2014 (GradStats). Tables updated include attainment of Year 12 or a formal qualification at Certificate II or above, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and median starting salary of Bachelor Degree graduates.
  • The Health domain has been updated to include data from the ABS Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey (AATSIHS), 2012-13, and Causes of Death, Australia, 2012. Tables updated include long-term health conditions for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and leading causes of death.
  • Unpublished data from the ABS Crime Victimisation, Australia, 2012-13; Recorded Crime – Victims, Australia, 2013; and Recorded Crime – Offenders, Australia, 2012-13, has been used to update five tables in the Safety and Justice domain including victims and victimisation rates for robbery by age, recorded victims and victimisation rates by selected offences, and offender rates by age and by principal offence.
  • The Democracy, governance and citizenship domain has been updated with unpublished data from the Australasian Institute of Judicial Administration and the Australian Honours and Awards Secretariat. Tables updated include Judges and magistrates (High Court, Federal Court, Family Court, Federal Magistrates Service) and State Supreme Court judges, and Recipients and nominations considered for the Order of Australia, General Division, by category.

The ‘Living with a Disability’ commentary has also been updated with data from the Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers, 2012 (cat. no. 4430.0).

Population by Age and Sex, Regions of Australia, 2013

September 5, 2014 Comments off

Population by Age and Sex, Regions of Australia, 2013
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

At 30 June 2013, Australia’s estimated resident population (ERP) was 23.1 million, an increase of 1.9 million people (8.9%) since 30 June 2008.

In 2013, just under one-third (32%) of Australia’s population resided in New South Wales, while one-quarter (25%) lived in Victoria.

The population grew in each of Australia’s states and territories between 2008 and 2013, with the largest increases in the country’s three most populous states. Victoria had the greatest growth (up by 483,000 people), followed by New South Wales (466,900) and Queensland (437,300). Western Australia had the fastest growth, increasing by 16%, followed by Queensland (10%), the Australian Capital Territory and the Northern Territory (both up by 9.5%). Tasmania had both the smallest and slowest growth, increasing by 14,600 people or 2.9%.

In 2013, just over one fifth of Australia’s population lived within Greater Sydney, while just under one fifth lived in Greater Melbourne. Greater Melbourne had the largest population growth of any capital city between 2008 and 2013, gaining 416,500 people. Greater Perth grew by 17%, which was the fastest growth of all capital cities in Australia. Greater Hobart experienced both the smallest (8,800 people) and slowest (4.2%) growth.

Motor Vehicle Census, Australia, 31 Jan 2014

August 14, 2014 Comments off

Motor Vehicle Census, Australia, 31 Jan 2014
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

This publication presents statistics relating to vehicles which were registered at 31 January 2014 with a motor vehicle registration authority. Motor vehicle registration statistics reflect the information as recorded in registration documents.

Statistics are provided on vehicle types comprising passenger vehicles, campervans, light commercial vehicles, trucks, buses and motor cycles. Vehicle characteristic information includes make of vehicle, year of manufacture, type of fuel that the vehicle was registered as using, and Gross Vehicle Mass or Gross Combination Mass for trucks. The size of the motor vehicle fleet is also compared with the estimated resident population.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,016 other followers