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Archive for the ‘Australian Bureau of Statistics’ Category

Motor Vehicle Census, Australia, 31 Jan 2014

August 14, 2014 Comments off

Motor Vehicle Census, Australia, 31 Jan 2014
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

This publication presents statistics relating to vehicles which were registered at 31 January 2014 with a motor vehicle registration authority. Motor vehicle registration statistics reflect the information as recorded in registration documents.

Statistics are provided on vehicle types comprising passenger vehicles, campervans, light commercial vehicles, trucks, buses and motor cycles. Vehicle characteristic information includes make of vehicle, year of manufacture, type of fuel that the vehicle was registered as using, and Gross Vehicle Mass or Gross Combination Mass for trucks. The size of the motor vehicle fleet is also compared with the estimated resident population.

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Research and Experimental Development, Government and Private Non-Profit Organisations, Australia, 2012-13

July 15, 2014 Comments off

Research and Experimental Development, Government and Private Non-Profit Organisations, Australia, 2012-13
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Expenditure and human resources devoted to research and experimental development (R&D) carried out by government and private non-profit organisations in Australia, classified by socioeconomic objective, field of research, type of expenditure, type of activity, source of funds, type of employee and location of expenditure. Most data are expressed in current prices but key aggregates are also expressed in volume terms.

Arts and Culture in Australia: A Statistical Overview, 2014

July 14, 2014 Comments off

Arts and Culture in Australia: A Statistical Overview, 2014
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Provides a statistical overview of culture in Australia. Contains information on a range of topics including employment in culture, time spent on cultural activities, attendances at cultural venues and events, expenditure on culture, and imports and exports of cultural goods and services. Also provides profiles of the cultural sectors, grouped according to the Australian Culture and Leisure Industry Classification.

Intellectual Disability, Australia, 2012

July 9, 2014 Comments off

Intellectual Disability, Australia, 2012
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Intellectual disability is a term used to describe a reduced ability to understand new or complex information and to learn and apply new skills (Endnote 1). The Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers (SDAC) defines intellectual disability as “difficulty learning or understanding things.”

Australian Citizenship Standard, 2014, Version 1.2

June 17, 2014 Comments off

Australian Citizenship Standard, 2014, Version 1.2
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Australian Citizenship is the variable which describes whether or not people are Australian citizens.

A question on nationality was first asked in the 1921 Census of Population and Housing. Respondents were required to indicate of which nation they were subjects by means of birthplace, parentage or naturalisation. From 1933 to 1976, nationality was asked. From 1976, the question has used the term ‘Citizenship’. In the 1981 Census, respondents were required to state their country of citizenship, whereas the 1986, and subsequent Australian Censuses, Census questions asked only whether the person was an Australian citizen.

Australian citizenship data for Statistical Area 1’s (SA1s) or Greater Capital City Statistical Areas (GCCSAs) are only available from the Census. Citizenship data at these lower geographic levels is regarded as essential by organisations such as the Australian Electoral Commission, various state electoral commissions and the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) . Small area data on Australian citizenship enables the tracking of migration patterns of Australian citizens over time, gives an accurate indication of what proportion of the population is on the electoral roll and, from this latter information, enables electoral boundary redistribution.

Australian citizenship data is also collected for the purpose of assessing the number of people who are not Australian citizens but who may be residentially eligible to apply for citizenship.

Preschool Education, Australia, 2013

March 20, 2014 Comments off

Preschool Education, Australia, 2013
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

This publication presents results from the 2013 National Early Childhood Education and Care Collection (the Collection). The Collection is a data development activity under the National Partnership Agreement on Early Childhood Education (NP ECE). The publication contains episode and unique counts of children enrolled in and attending a preschool program, and episode counts of workers delivering a preschool program across Australia in 2013.

See also: National Early Childhood Education and Care Collection: Concepts, Sources and Methods, 2013
See also: National Early Childhood Education and Care Collection: Data Collection Guide, 2013

AU — Education News, February 2014

February 21, 2014 Comments off

Education News, February 2014
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

The theme for this edition is Multiculturalism.

Migration, Australia, 2011-12 and 2012-13

January 14, 2014 Comments off

Migration, Australia, 2011-12 and 2012-13
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

This publication brings together statistics on international migration into and out of Australia, internal migration within Australia (including interstate and intrastate) and information on overseas-born residents of Australia.

Deaths, Australia, 2012

November 11, 2013 Comments off

Deaths, Australia, 2012
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

This release brings together statistics on deaths and mortality in Australia. Data refer to deaths registered during the calendar year shown, unless otherwise stated. State or territory relates to state or territory of usual residence, unless otherwise stated.

AU — Directory of Family and Domestic Violence Statistics, 2013

October 10, 2013 Comments off

Directory of Family and Domestic Violence Statistics, 2013
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Family and Domestic Violence is a community-wide problem that requires involvement from all levels of government across the health, welfare, family and community services and crime and justice sectors. The multi-disciplinary nature of Family and Domestic Violence service provision and information collection/research has meant that much of the data relevant to this field has remained invisible, under-utilised and distributed across sectors, jurisdictions and levels of government.

The Family and Domestic Violence Directory, 2013 (Directory) aims to improve awareness, and ultimately the use of Family and Domestic Violence-related data, collected by or on behalf of Australian governments. The Directory provides researchers, policy analysts and practitioners with a single place to identify information about Australian and State and Territory Government sources of publicly available statistical information related to Family and Domestic Violence.
The information provided can be used by readers to:

  • better understand the purpose, collection methods and outputs available from each data source;
  • inform an assessment of whether data from a particular source are likely to meet their information needs; and if so,
  • locate published data sources or contact data custodians to request data, where available, via the contact details and hyperlinks included.

AU — Young women lag behind young men on numeracy skills, but perform well on literacy

October 9, 2013 Comments off

Young women lag behind young men on numeracy skills, but perform well on literacy
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Young women have lower numeracy skills than young men, according to figures released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

However, ABS Director Myles Burleigh said that when it comes to literacy skills, young women were doing just as well as young men.

“The survey measured participants skills in literacy, numeracy, and problem-solving in technology-rich environments and assigns them to a number of different levels.

“The higher the level, the better your skills, so Level 2 represents higher skill levels than Level 1, and so on. Level 3 or above for literacy and numeracy represents relatively advanced skills.

“For numeracy, 45 per cent of young men aged 15 to 19 ranked at Level 3 or above, compared with 39 per cent of young women.

“However, for literacy, 56 per cent of young women and 53 per cent of young men ranked at Level 3 or above.”

Mr Burleigh said that the survey also found that Australians with a non-school qualification are much more likely to have high levels of literacy and numeracy than those without a qualification.

AU — Profiles of Disability

August 13, 2013 Comments off

Profiles of Disability
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Profiles of Disability provides an overview of the characteristics and activities of people with disabilities in Australia. It is designed to provide a comprehensive analysis of different aspects of living with disability in Australia that are addressed in the 2009 Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers (SDAC) – the main source of data for this publication.

When complete, the publication will examine a variety of areas including:

  • the characteristics of people with disabilities that belong to particular interest groups (e.g. children, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds);
  • the disabling nature of some long-term health conditions (e.g. Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinsons disease);
  • the impact particular impairments can have on people’s abilities to do everyday tasks (e.g. vision or hearing impairments);
  • how well people with disabilities are able to engage both economically (e.g. employment) and socially and issues relating to accessibility (e.g. transportation use, computer use); and
  • an analysis of the people who need and receive assistance with everyday activities and who provides that assistance.

AU — Perspectives on Sport, June 2013

June 11, 2013 Comments off

Perspectives on Sport, June 2013

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Perspectives on Sport is a series of short articles on topics of interest relating to sport and physical recreation using data sourced from a range of ABS surveys.

This is the ninth issue of Perspectives on Sport. Future releases will feature articles on topics that are current in the media and of interest to the community using survey data as it becomes available. In most cases the data presented will be current, however, it is recommended that users check for more recent releases through the ABS website by going to the Sport and Physical Recreation Topics @ a Glance page.

Prisoners in Australia, 2012

April 3, 2013 Comments off

Prisoners in Australia, 2012

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

This publication presents information from the National Prisoner Census about persons held in Australian prisons on the night of 30 June 2012. The National Prisoner Census covers all prisoners in the legal custody of adult corrective services in adult prisons, including periodic detainees in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory. It excludes persons held in juvenile justice institutions, psychiatric custody and police custody. It is based on data extracted from administrative records held by the corrective services agencies in each Australian state and territory. These statistics provide a profile of the legal status, sentence details and demographic characteristics of Australian prisoners in the legal custody of adult prisons.

Users of this publication should note that it provides a statistical picture of the persons in prison at a point in time (30 June 2012), and does not represent the flow of prisoners during the year. The majority of prisoners in the annual Prisoner Census were serving long-term sentences for serious offences, whereas the flow of offenders in and out of prisons consists primarily of persons serving short sentences for lesser offences. Complementary information to this publication about Australian prisoners is available in the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) quarterly publication, Corrective Services, Australia (cat. no. 4512.0).

Children’s Participation in Cultural and Leisure Activities, Australia, Apr 2012

November 6, 2012 Comments off

Children’s Participation in Cultural and Leisure Activities, Australia, Apr 2012

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

This publication contains results from the 2012 Survey of Children’s Participation in Cultural and Leisure Activities, conducted throughout Australia in April 2012 as a supplement to the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ (ABS) monthly Labour Force Survey (LFS). Information about the participation of children aged 5 to 14 years in cultural, sporting and other leisure activities is provided. Details on children’s use of the Internet and mobile phones are also presented.

Information collected in the survey includes:

  • children’s participation in selected organised cultural activities and organised sports, and attendance at selected cultural venues and events outside of school hours during the 12 months prior to interview
  • participation in selected recreational activities (such as skateboarding, rollerblading or riding a scooter, bike riding, watching television, videos or DVDs, and other screen-based activities) outside of school hours during the most recent two school weeks prior to interview
  • the use of the Internet and mobile phones
  • characteristics of children who participated and the frequency and duration of their involvement in some activities.

Perspectives on Migrants, 2012

October 4, 2012 Comments off

Perspectives on Migrants, 2012

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

This article uses the ABS 2010 General Social Survey (GSS) to analyse several characteristics of social and community connectedness of two migrant arrival groups – those arriving before 2006 and those arriving between 2006 and 2010. It explores the types of social activities migrants engaged in and with whom, frequency of engagements, types of social organisations participated in, as well as their general levels of life satisfaction and trust. The article aims to analyse ‘life outcomes‘ variables collected in the 2010 GSS to similar variables that formed part of the Settlement Outcomes of Newly Arrived migrants survey (SoNA) that was independently commissioned by the Department of Immigration and Citizenship.

Suicides, Australia, 2010

July 30, 2012 Comments off

Suicides, Australia, 2010
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Suicide is a major public health issue. Although death by suicide is relatively uncommon (approximately 1.6% of all deaths), the human costs are substantial and can impact broadly across communities. As such, suicide prevention is a key focus for both government agencies and non-government organisations.

Over recent years there have been two government enquiries which have made recommendations on improving suicide data. The Senate report – ‘The Hidden Toll: Suicide in Australia’, was released in June 2010. This report highlighted issues with data quality and availability, focussing especially on under-reporting of suicide deaths. The House of Representatives report – ‘Before it’s too late’ was released in July 2011. This report made specific recommendations on extending the scope of social and demographic data that is routinely collected on suicide deaths, and the availability of disaggregated data for research purposes.

The ABS has responded to challenges concerning the quality of suicide data through the implementation of new coding guidelines, and a three year revisions program for coroner certified deaths (see Chapter 2 for more information). This revisions process allows time for coroners to investigate potential suicide deaths and make a determination on whether the death was as a result of intentional self-harm.

In terms of expanding the availability of data on suicide, there were several additional data items, the importance of which were highlighted by the House of Representatives report – ‘Before it’s too late’, including ethnicity, culture, geography, educational attainment, employment status and socio-economic status. Many of these data items are not captured in current datasets, and the viability of collection in the future will need further investigation. However, additional information that can be publicly reported is available in current datasets. This information can provide further insight into the impacts of suicide across particular segments of the Australian community, and is presented in this report.

Australian Social Trends — March 2012

March 30, 2012 Comments off

Australian Social Trends — March 2012
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics
+ Life on ‘Struggle Street': Australians in low economic resource households
This article looks at the characteristics of people in households with both relatively low income and relatively low wealth.
+ Love Me Do
This article examines the trends in marriage, de facto relationships and divorce over the last twenty years.
+ Life after Homelessness
This article presents a comparison of people who have been homeless in the last 10 years with those who have never been homeless.
+ Disability and Work
This article looks at the characteristics of working-age people with disability and their involvement in the labour force.

Causes of Death, Australia, 2010

March 22, 2012 Comments off

Causes of Death, Australia, 2010
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

nformation contained in the preceding chapters of this publication refer to deaths registered during the 2010 calendar year. In this chapter, death statistics are based on a year of occurrence, that is, the year in which the death actually occurred, rather than the year it was registered. The presentation of year of occurrence data in this publication facilitates international comparisons.

There are a proportion of deaths that occur in a year which are not registered until subsequent years. The international standard for publishing on a year of occurrence basis is to include deaths registered within the relevant occurrence year, and deaths for that same occurrence year which are registered the year immediately following. For example, deaths occuring in 2009 that have been registered in both 2009 and 2010 are presented below.

Analysis of deaths in Australia has shown that the number of deaths registered after the second year are not significant; that is, there is a very small number of deaths registered after the second year.

Year of occurrence data allow for seasonal analysis, and data are not distorted by the effects of late registrations or changes in time lags in processing registrations. In those countries where registration systems are complete and timely, there is not a significant difference between the number of deaths derived on a year of registration basis and those on a year of occurrence basis.

For Australia, approximately 95% of deaths registered in a particular year occurred in that year. However, variations can occur in certain subsets of the population and for particular causes of death. For instance, while 94.8% of the total 140,760 deaths registered in 2009 occurred in the same year, only 86.7% of the 2,405 Indigenous deaths and 91.6% of 9,043 deaths due to External causes registered in 2009 occurred in that year. More detailed data for specific causes or population groups are available from the ABS on request.

AU — Directory of Family and Domestic Violence Statistics, 2011

February 2, 2012 Comments off
Source:  Australian Bureau of Statistics
Provides an on-line reference point for sources of data relating to Family and Domestic Violence (FDV) that are collected by, or on behalf of, Australian and State and Territory Government agencies. Directory entries provide information about the purpose, type of collection, frequency, history and range of FDV-related data available from each collection. Contact details, including links to source agencies are also provided as well as information about publications and further data availability for each source.
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