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Archive for the ‘poverty’ Category

The growing distance between people and jobs in metropolitan America

March 26, 2015 Comments off

The growing distance between people and jobs in metropolitan America
Source: Brookings Institution

Proximity to employment can influence a range of economic and social outcomes, from local fiscal health to the employment prospects of residents, particularly low-income and minority workers. An analysis of private-sector employment and demographic data at the census tract level reveals that:

Between 2000 and 2012, the number of jobs within the typical commute distance for residents in a major metro area fell by 7 percent.

As employment suburbanized, the number of jobs near both the typical city and suburban resident fell.

As poor and minority residents shifted toward suburbs in the 2000s, their proximity to jobs fell more than for non-poor and white residents.

Residents of high-poverty and majority-minority neighborhoods experienced particularly pronounced declines in job proximity.

Review of WIC Food Packages: An Evaluation of White Potatoes in the Cash Value Voucher: Letter Report (2015)

March 24, 2015 Comments off

Review of WIC Food Packages: An Evaluation of White Potatoes in the Cash Value Voucher: Letter Report (2015)
Source: Institute of Medicine

Review of WIC Food Packages: An Evaluation of White Potatoes in the Cash Value Voucher assesses the impact of 2009 regulation to allow the purchase of vegetables and fruits, excluding white potatoes, with a cash value voucher on food and nutrient intakes of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) population and to consider whether white potatoes should be permitted for purchase with the voucher. This report considers the effects on diet quality, the health and cultural needs of the WIC population, and allows for effective and efficient administration nationwide in a cost-effective manner. Review of WIC Food Packages: An Evaluation of White Potatoes in the Cash Value Voucher recommends that the U.S. Department of Agriculture should allow white potatoes as a WIC-eligible vegetable, in forms currently permitted for other vegetables, in the cash value voucher pending changes to starchy vegetable intake recommendations in the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

The Food Assistance Landscape: FY 2014 Annual Report

March 24, 2015 Comments off

The Food Assistance Landscape: FY 2014 Annual Report
Source: USDA Economic Research Service

In this report, the Economic Research Service (ERS) uses preliminary data from USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) to examine trends in U.S. food and nutrition assistance programs through fiscal 2014 (October 1, 2013 to September 30, 2014) and ERS data to examine trends in the prevalence and severity of household food insecurity in the United States through 2013.

Measuring Access to Opportunity in the United States

March 20, 2015 Comments off

Measuring Access to Opportunity in the United States
Source: Annie E. Casey Foundation

This KIDS COUNT data snapshot illustrates how outdated methods measuring poverty in the United States are giving an inaccurate picture of how families are really faring and what public programs are actually working. The brief introduces the more accurate Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM) and shows how government programs affect state poverty rates. Recommendations on targeting families in need give policymakers input on implementing efficient and cost-effective public programs.

The Effects of Potential Cuts in SNAP Spending on Households With Different Amounts of Income

March 18, 2015 Comments off

The Effects of Potential Cuts in SNAP Spending on Households With Different Amounts of Income
Source: Congressional Budget Office

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as Food Stamps) provides benefits to low-income households to help them buy food. Total federal expenditures on SNAP amounted to $76 billion in fiscal year 2014. In an average month that year, 47 million people (or one in seven U.S. residents) received SNAP benefits.

Some policymakers have expressed a desire to scale back the program significantly to reduce federal spending. In this report, CBO examines several options for doing so and their effects on the benefits that would be received by households with different amounts of income.

Transitioning from Medicaid Expansion Programs to Medicare: Making Sure Low-Income Medicare Beneficiaries Get Financial Help

March 12, 2015 Comments off

Transitioning from Medicaid Expansion Programs to Medicare: Making Sure Low-Income Medicare Beneficiaries Get Financial Help
Source: Urban Institute

The Affordable Care Act allows states to offer Medicaid coverage to low-income adults who would not have qualified under previous law. This population will face higher cost-sharing requirements when they transition to Medicare, although some may be eligible for traditional Medicaid benefits and/or Medicare Savings Programs (MSPs) that will reduce their costs. This report discusses how Medicare beneficiaries can qualify for traditional Medicaid and MSPs, provides new estimates of the number and characteristics of eligible individuals, and outlines policy options that would make it easier for Medicare beneficiaries to qualify for traditional Medicaid benefits and MSPs.

Poverty and Employment Transitions in the UK and EU, 2007-2012

March 11, 2015 Comments off

Poverty and Employment Transitions in the UK and EU, 2007-2012
Source: Office for National Statistics

  • In the UK, 8% of people in employment were also in relative income poverty in 2013, equivalent to around 3 million people.
  • Over the period 2007-2012, of people aged 18-59 who were not working and living in a household in poverty, 70% of those who entered employment left poverty.
  • There are a number of employment-related factors which affect how likely it is people will move out of poverty after getting a job. This includes the level of pay, as well as whether the job is full-time or part-time (and if part-time the number of hours). Other factors, such as the composition of the household people live in may also have an impact.
  • People taking up temporary roles are no less likely to leave poverty than those taking up permanent contracts. However, temporary workers are more likely to see their income fall below the poverty threshold the following year.
  • 70% of those leaving in-work poverty did so following an increase in their hourly pay, including those taking up a new job, while an increase in average hours was associated with 38% of exits from in-work poverty.
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