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Family violence in Canada: A statistical profile, 2013

March 19, 2015 Comments off

Family violence in Canada: A statistical profile, 2013 (PDF)
Source: Statistics Canada

There were just under 88,000 victims of family violence in Canada in 2013, according to police-reported data. This represented more than one-quarter of all violent crimes reported to police.

Just under half (48%) of all victims of family violence were victimized by a current or former spouse. For another 17% of family violence victims, the accused was a parent, while for 14% the accused was an extended family member such as an in-law, uncle or grandparent. A further 11% of family violence victims were victimized by a sibling and for 10% the accused was the victim’s own child.

As in previous years, a majority of police-reported incidents of family violence involved physical assault, which included actions and behaviours such as pushing, slapping, punching and face-to-face threats.

Police-reported data also reveal that in 2013 almost 7 in 10 family violence victims were female. In comparison, females represented 46% of victims of violent crimes that were not family-related. The over-representation of female victims was most prominent in the spousal violence category, where nearly 8 in 10 victims were female.

Rates of police-reported family violence varied by age. Among females, family violence victimization rates were generally highest for those in their thirties. However, for male victims, rates of family violence were highest for 15- to 19-year-olds. Seniors (aged 65 and over) recorded the lowest rates of police-reported family violence of any age group, regardless of gender.

Health Canada Publishes Revised Human Exposure Limits for Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Energy

March 19, 2015 Comments off

Health Canada Publishes Revised Human Exposure Limits for Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Energy
Source: Health Canada

Today Health Canada published its revised Safety Code 6. Safety Code 6 is Health Canada’s guideline for recommended human exposure limits to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic energy, the kind of energy given off by various electronic devices such as cell phones and Wi-Fi, as well as broadcasting and cell phone towers.

Health Canada has updated Safety Code 6 based on the latest available scientific evidence, including improved modelling of the interaction of radiofrequency fields with the human body. The revised Safety Code takes into consideration recommendations from the Royal Society of Canada’s Expert Panel on Safety Code 6, as well as the scientific and technical feedback received by Health Canada during the public consultation on the proposed guideline. The updated Safety Code includes slightly more restrictive reference levels in some frequency ranges to ensure even larger safety margins to protect all Canadians, including newborn infants and children.

Health Canada reminds all Canadians that their health has always been protected from radiofrequency electromagnetic energy by the exposure limits in Safety Code 6. Safety Code 6 has always established human exposure limits that are far below the established, scientific threshold for potentially harmful health effects. The limits in Safety Code 6 are based on established, scientific evidence, and provide protection against all known harmful health effects for all individuals.

Supreme Court of Canada — Statistics 2004 to 2014

March 17, 2015 Comments off

Supreme Court of Canada — Statistics 2004 to 2014
Source: Supreme Court of Canada

This report sets out a statistical view of the work of the Supreme Court of Canada in 2014 with comparisons to the previous ten years’ work.

Government of Canada Reveals New Research on Tobacco, Alcohol and Drug Use

February 6, 2015 Comments off

Government of Canada Reveals New Research on Tobacco, Alcohol and Drug Use
Source: Health Canada

The Government of Canada published today the results of the 2013 Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol, and Drugs Survey (CTADS), which demonstrate progress made in sustaining all-time lows in smoking rates, while also highlighting the need for continued attention to issues such as marijuana use among youth and prescription drug abuse.

The CTADS is a national general population survey of tobacco, alcohol and drug use among Canadians aged 15 years and older, with a focus on 15-24 year olds. More than 14,500 Canadians were interviewed for the survey, conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of Health Canada.

The survey includes the first national data on e-cigarette use, which will add to the growing body of knowledge Health Canada is gathering to determine next steps in regulating this product. Last fall, Minister Ambrose asked the Standing Committee on Health to study the potential risks and benefits of e-cigarettes and to seek the advice of a variety of health stakeholders. The Standing Committee report is expected to be released in early 2015.

Understanding trends in tobacco, alcohol and drug use is vital to the effective development and implementation of strategies, policies and programs. The CTADS data will contribute to sources of evidence as the Government of Canada continues to create policies and programs that respond to the needs of Canadians and protect health and safety.

This is the first release of the CTADS, which merged two previous survey tools – the Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey (CTUMS) and the Canadian Drug and Alcohol Use Monitoring Survey (CADUMS), streamlining federal efforts and representing the first time that tobacco, drug and alcohol data has been reported together.

Canada’s crime rate: Two decades of decline

February 3, 2015 Comments off

Canada’s crime rate: Two decades of decline
Source: Statistics Canada

Crime.

It’s reported in the news every day. Sometimes, it’s the leading story.

We read about it, talk about it, and wonder how the news stories relate to the overall picture.

And the numbers tell us that the overall police-reported crime rate in Canada has been falling for more than 20 years.

Health Canada Publishes Findings From Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study

January 13, 2015 Comments off

Health Canada Publishes Findings From Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study
Source: Health Canada

Today, Health Canada published findings from the Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study. Launched in 2012, in collaboration with Statistics Canada, this study explored the relationship between exposure to wind turbine noise and the health effects reported by, and measured in, people living near wind turbines.

In the effort of being more open and transparent, the findings are available on Health Canada’s website. The findings provide a more complete overall assessment of the potential impacts that exposure to wind turbines may have on health and well-being.

No evidence was found to support a link between exposure to wind turbine noise and any of the self-reported or measured health endpoints examined. However, the study did demonstrate a relationship between increasing levels of wind turbine noise and annoyance towards several features (including noise, vibration, shadow flicker, and the aircraft warning lights on top of the turbines) associated with wind turbines.

It is important to note that the findings from this study do not provide definitive answers on their own and must be considered in the context of a broader evidence base.

Violence perpetrated by ex-spouses in Canada

December 30, 2014 Comments off

Violence perpetrated by ex-spouses in Canada
Source: Justice Canada

Intimate partner violence affects the lives of many Canadians. In 2011, there were 97,451 victims of police-reported intimate partner violence1 (Sinha 2013) with women representing 80% of the victims of police-reported intimate partner violence in 2011.

While these numbers provide some insight into the prevalence of spousal violence2 in Canada, it only reflects a small portion of the actual violence that occurs. Data from the 2009 General Social Survey – Victimization (GSS) found that only 22% of victims of self-reported spousal violence reported the incident to the police (Brennan 2011). These numbers also do not provide information on the prevalence of violence perpetrated by ex-spouses, nor the experiences of victims of ex-spousal violence

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