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China and International Law in Cyberspace

May 13, 2014 Comments off

China and International Law in Cyberspace (PDF)
Source: U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission

The Chinese government states it intends to work with the “international community to promote the building of a peaceful, secure, open, and cooperative cyberspace.” Similarly, U.S. government policy is to “work internationally to promote an open, interoperable, secure, and reliable” cyberspace. While this semantic overlap in officially stated goals suggests strong similarities between China and the United States in their viewpoints on international law and norms in cyberspace, they are more different than similar. China’s participation in a 2013 UN report affirming the applicability of international law to cyberspace is a promising development. The same UN group will gather in 2014 to address some of the more challenging and divisive concepts regarding state responsibility and use of force in cyberspace. Any fractures in the debate at this meeting will likely reflect some of the major differences between the United States and China on cyberspace policy. These differences will likely endure as Beijing is presently unwilling to compromise on issues such as Internet sovereignty and information control, which it judges as critical to the maintenance in power of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) regime.

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China’s Hunger for U.S. Planes and Cars: Assessing the Risks

April 8, 2014 Comments off

China’s Hunger for U.S. Planes and Cars: Assessing the Risks (PDF)
Source: U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission

The U.S. trade deficit with China continues to grow but at a slower rate. A key reason for this is the boom in U.S. automotive and aerospace shipments to China. As China becomes more affluent and urbanized, ordinary Chinese are driving more cars and traveling more by frequently by air. China’s future demand, however, could be affected by pollution, traffic bottlenecks, and other factors. U.S. companies must also contend with China’s industrial policy, which tilts the playing field toward domestic industry. In the long run, technology transfer and off-shoring could erode U.S. competitiveness and take business away from U.S. plants.

U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission 2013 Annual Report to Congress

November 22, 2013 Comments off

U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission 2013 Annual Report to Congress
Source: U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission
From press release (PDF):

This year’s report covers Chinese bilateral economic and trade issues, security developments in the U.S.-China relationship, and China’s diplomatic efforts in the Asia-Pacific region and beyond. The report examines the nature of China’s foreign direct investment in the U.S. and abroad, China’s financial system and investor protections, and issues in agriculture trade and food safety between the U.S. and China. The report’s analysis of security issues impacting the relationship between China, the U.S. and its allies in the region includes key developments over the last year, China’s growing cyber capabilities and activities, and China’s maritime disputes in the South and East China Seas. This year the report also examines China’s relationships with countries in the Middle East and North Africa, cross-Strait relations, and relevant economic and security issues in China’s Special Autonomous Regions of Macau and Hong Kong.

U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission 2012 Report to Congress

November 15, 2012 Comments off

U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission 2012 Report to Congress (PDF)

Source: U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission

From press release (PDF):

The U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission released its 2012 Report to Congress today.

This year’s report covers recent developments in the U.S.-China trade and economic relationship; the role of state-owned enterprises in China, the U.S.-China trade and investment relationship, recent developments in China’s military, China’s cyber capabilities, developments in China’s nuclear and strategic abilities, China in the South China Sea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, China in Europe, China’s demand and control of global resources, China’s efforts to become a more innovative society, and the Chinese political transition.

An Analysis of State‐owned Enterprises and State Capitalism in China

October 28, 2011 Comments off

An Analysis of State‐owned Enterprises and State Capitalism in China (PDF)
Source: U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission
From press release (PDF):

China’s breathtaking economic growth, has often led observers to assume that the country’s economic system has been transformed into a capitalist economy dominated by private enterprise. Although China’s reliance on private enterprise and market-based incentives has been growing, and the CCP’s treatment of private enterprises and entrepreneurs has been changing, it would be a mistake to minimize the current role of the State and the CCP in shaping economic outcomes in China and beyond. The Chinese government and state-owned enterprises (SOEs) remain potent economic forces. Indeed, some of China’s SOEs are among the largest firms in China and the world. They are major investors in foreign countries. They have been involved in some of the largest initial public offerings in recent years and remain the controlling owners of many major firms listed on Chinese and foreign stock exchanges.

Previous reports and analyses by academics and policy experts have estimated that Chinese SOEs, and other state-affiliated enterprises, hold a lower share of China’s non-agricultural GDP than that estimated in this report, which provides a comprehensive analysis of that country’s control and influence over its economic enterprises. This report tracks testimony heard by the Commission that China’s privatization reforms have, in some cases, reversed and that the state sector is strengthening.

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