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Inspection of the Bureau of Diplomatic Security, High Threat Programs Directorate

October 16, 2014 Comments off

Inspection of the Bureau of Diplomatic Security, High Threat Programs Directorate (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of State, Office of Inspector General

Key Findings

+ The establishment of the Bureau of Diplomatic Security, High Threat Programs directorate in 2013 enabled the Bureau of Diplomatic Security to enhance its focus on the security needs of overseas posts most susceptible to risk and threat.

+ The High Threat Programs directorate suffers from significant staffing gaps and position shortages. In order to continue to meet its goals, the Department needs to staff the directorate fully.

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Homeland Security OIG — Improvements Continue at Detention Centers

October 8, 2014 Comments off

Improvements Continue at Detention Centers (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of Inspector General

The latest in a series of spot inspections by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), found overall improvement, several recurring problems and declining populations at detention facilities for unaccompanied alien children (UAC) operated by Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

+ Full Report (PDF)

DHS OIG — Flawed FEMA System Could Hamper Disaster Relief

October 7, 2014 Comments off

Flawed FEMA System Could Hamper Disaster Relief (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of Inspector General

After spending more than $247 million on a high-tech system, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) may still not be able to efficiently deliver emergency supplies to survivors of a catastrophic disaster, an Office of Inspector General (OIG) audit has found.

OIG Report 14-151, “FEMA’s Logistics Supply Chain Management System May Not Be Effective During a Catastrophic Disaster,” found the system, developed over nine years, cannot interface with those of its partners and suppliers, making it difficult to track and locate emergency supplies. The report also noted that FEMA does not have enough trained employees to efficiently operate the system.

+ Full Report (PDF)

HHS OIG — Spotlight on… Medicaid: State Policies That Result in Inflated Federal Costs

October 3, 2014 Comments off

Spotlight on… Medicaid: State Policies That Result in Inflated Federal Costs
Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General

Signed into law in 1965, Medicaid ensures health coverage for nearly 60 million Americans today. Since the Medicaid program was established, the costs and responsibilities for administering it have been shared between the States and the Federal Government. However, a number of OIG reports have cited examples of State policies that distort the cost-sharing arrangement, causing the Federal Government to pay more than its share of Medicaid expenditures. These mechanisms do not result in any increase in benefit to beneficiaries, and while they increase States’ funds, they do so at the expense of the Federal Government and, ultimately, Federal taxpayers.

DOD OIG — Evaluation of Military Criminal Investigative Organizations’ Child Sexual Assault Investigations

October 2, 2014 Comments off

Evaluation of Military Criminal Investigative Organizations’ Child Sexual Assault Investigations
Source: U.S. Department of Defense, Office of Inspector General

Objective

We evaluated 163 Military Criminal Investigative Organization (MCIO) investigations of sexual assaults of children closed in 2012 to determine whether the MCIOs completed investigations as required by DoD, Military Service, and MCIO guidance. Our evaluation focused on:

  • whether the MCIOs investigated child sexual assaults as required by guiding policies and procedures.

Findings

  • A total of 153 of 163 MCIO investigations (94 percent) met investigative standards.
  • A total of 10 of 163 MCIO investigations (6 percent) had significant deficiencies. We returned those 10 cases to the MCIOs for follow-up corrective action.
  • A total of 57 of the 163 cases had no investigative deficiencies.
  • The remaining 96 cases had minor deficiencies that had no impact on the outcome or resolution of the investigation.
  • All three MCIOs had instances in which:

    - they either did not issue or did not properly document the issuance of the DD Form 2701, “Initial Information for Victims and Witnesses of Crime,” to victims or – – the appropriate guardian or family member;
    – subject, victim, and witness interviews were not thorough;
    – logical investigative leads, such as interviews of witnesses, or leads gleaned during interviews were not addressed or conducted; and
    – physical or digital evidence was not collected.

Recommendations

  • The Director and Commanders of the MCIOs:

- continue to emphasize thorough completion of all child sexual assault investigations,
– implement measures to improve the issuing and/or recording the DD Form 2701, and
– consider enhancement of existing policy guidance regarding the collection of clothing and digital evidence

  • The Director, Naval Criminal Investigative Service improve guidance and enhance supervision regarding responses to crime scenes.

Management Comments and Our Response

Management comments were generally responsive; however, the Commander, U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command (CID) expressed concern regarding our review processes. The project’s evaluation and reporting processes were independently evaluated and were found to comply with the Council of Inspectors General for Integrity and Efficiency (CIGIE) standards. We considered management comments on a draft of this report when preparing the final report and made changes as appropriate.

Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Needs to Provide Better Accountability and Transparency Over Direct Contributions

October 1, 2014 Comments off

Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Needs to Provide Better Accountability and Transparency Over Direct Contributions
Source: U.S. Department of Defense, Office of Inspector General

Objective

Our objective was to determine whether the Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan’s (GIRoA) Ministries of Defense (MoD) and Interior (MoI) have controls in place to ensure a transparent and accountable fiscal process for the direct funding provided for the sustainment of the Afghan National Security Force (ANSF).

Findings

GIRoA lacked the basic controls to provide reasonable assurance that it appropriately spent $3.3 billion of ASFF direct contributions. These controls are key aspects of a transparent and accountable fiscal process. Specifically,

  • Ministry of Finance (MoF) could not provide a current cash balance for direct contributions or account for currency gains of at least $110.4 million made on Afghanistan Security Forces Fund (ASFF) direct contributions.
  • MoF could not provide support for $17.4 million and MoI could not support $9.9 million withheld from ANSF salaries.
  • MoD and MoI controls over the payroll process were not adequate.
  • MoI processed $40 million in payroll payments that appeared improper.
  • MoD and MoI incorrectly charged $82.7 million of ASFF direct contribution funds.
  • This occurred because GIRoA did not develop the ministerial capability and capacity tomanage and oversee ASFF direct contributions and Combined Security Transition Command–Afghanistan (CSTC-A) had not held GIRoA accountable for not implementing controls and improper handling of ASFF direct contribution funds.

As a result, CSTC-A could not verify that GIRoA used ASFF direct contributions properly or for their intended purposes. In addition, the $13 billion in additional direct contributions DoD plans to provide to the ANSF between FY 2015 and FY 2019 may be subject to wasteful spending and abuse.

FEMA Miscalculation Costs Taxpayers $12 Million

October 1, 2014 Comments off

FEMA Miscalculation Costs Taxpayers $12 Million (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of Inspector General

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) officials did not follow their own disaster relief guidelines in response to 2008 flooding in Cedar Rapids, IA, resulting in a loss to taxpayers of more than $12 million, according to a new report by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), Department of Homeland Security.

OIG auditors determined that officials did not correctly follow FEMA’s “50 Percent Rule” in determining that four flood-damaged structures in Cedar Rapids be replaced, rather than repaired. The rule states that Federal funds can be used to replace damaged structures only when the cost of repairs meets or exceeds 50 percent of the repair costs. The OIG found that none of the four structures – the Main Library, two animal control facilities and a park maintenance shop – met the 50 percent threshold and could have been repaired for a total of $8.57 million. FEMA granted the city more than $20.6 million to replace the buildings.

“FEMA needs to improve and refine its calculations in regard to repairing or replacing damaged facilities,” said Inspector General John Roth. “We have made several recommendations that will assist FEMA in that process and hopefully prevent misspending on disaster relief.”

+ Full Report (PDF)

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