Archive

Archive for the ‘transportation and travel’ Category

Improved Interactions Drive Gen Y Increase in Auto Insurance Satisfaction

July 17, 2015 Comments off

Improved Interactions Drive Gen Y Increase in Auto Insurance Satisfaction
Source: J.D. Power

Gen Y[1] customers are the driving force behind an increase in overall auto insurance satisfaction due to improvement across all customer service interaction channels, the largest contributor to the customer experience, according to the J.D. Power 2015 U.S. Auto Insurance StudySM released today.

The study examines customer satisfaction in five factors: interaction; price; policy offerings; billing and payment; and claims. Satisfaction is measured on a 1,000-point scale.

Customer interaction preferences are changing. Gen Y’s preference to interact exclusively through digital self-service (Web or mobile) has increased to 27 percent in 2015 from 21 percent in 2011. A similar pattern of preference is found in other generational groups (Gen X: 23% vs. 19% in 2011; Boomers: 12% vs. 10%; and Pre-Boomers: 6% vs. 4%). Among the interaction channels, satisfaction with the website experience receives the lowest average score, most notably among Gen Y customers (816, compared with 826 for Gen X, 841 for Boomers and 861 for Pre-Boomers).

Improving Emergency Response at Airports

July 17, 2015 Comments off

Improving Emergency Response at Airports
Source: Transportation Research Board

The April 2015 issue of TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Impacts on Practice highlights how airports like Grand Forks International Airport (GFK) in North Dakota have applied the findings from ACRP Report 95: Integrating Community Emergency Response Teams (A-CERTs) at Airports. Officials at GFK credit the direction provided in ACRP Report 95 with enabling the airport to build, implement, and maintain a successful response team.

Air Base Attacks and Defensive Counters: Historical Lessons and Future Challenges

July 16, 2015 Comments off

Air Base Attacks and Defensive Counters: Historical Lessons and Future Challenges
Source: RAND Corporation

Since the end of the Cold War, U.S. dominance in conventional power projection has allowed American airpower to operate from sanctuary, largely free from enemy attack. This led to a reduced emphasis on air-base defense measures and the misperception that sanctuary was the normal state of affairs rather than an aberration. The emergence of the long-range, highly accurate, conventional missile (both ballistic and cruise) as a threat to air bases is now widely recognized in the U.S. defense community, and, with that recognition, there is a growing appreciation that this era of sanctuary is coming to an end. Consequently, there is renewed interest in neglected topics, such as base hardening, aircraft dispersal, camouflage, deception, and air-base recovery and repair.

This report is intended to provide a reference on air-base attack and defense to inform public debate, as well as government deliberations, on what has become known as the anti-access problem, specifically as it applies to air-base operations. The report explores the history of air-base attacks in the past century and describes the American way of war that emerged after the fall of the Soviet Union. It then argues that emerging threat systems are disruptive to this way of war and will require new concepts of power projection. Finally, the report identifies five classes of defensive options that have proven valuable in past conflicts and offers recommendations on how best to win the battle of the airfields.

Sovereign Immunity for Public Airport Operations

July 15, 2015 Comments off

Sovereign Immunity for Public Airport Operations
Source: Transportation Research Board

TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Legal Research Digest 24: Sovereign Immunity for Public Airport Operations examines sovereign immunity as it applies to public airports that are owned and operated by units of local government or regional governmental authorities. This report summarizes the extent of sovereign immunity granted to airports from state to state. Appendix A provides a table of cases, and Appendix B contains a chart of authorities.

Auto Franchise Laws Restrict Consumer Choice and Increase Prices

July 14, 2015 Comments off

Auto Franchise Laws Restrict Consumer Choice and Increase Prices
Source: Mercatus Center

Arizona, Michigan, New Jersey, and Texas recently received the 2014 Luddite Award from the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation for preventing automaker Tesla from selling cars directly to consumers. These states’ efforts to ban direct sales are reminiscent of the Luddites, nineteenth-century English workers employed in the textile industry who both rejected technological development and actively worked to prevent its use through its destruction. State legislatures, rather than destroying physical plant and equipment like the Luddites, actively impede alternative distribution models, reducing consumer choice.

Auto franchise laws often include three major restrictions: mandatory dealership licensing requirements, onerous terms for terminating dealerships, and the creation of exclusive territories for incumbent dealers. Each rule carries a potential cost for consumers.

The coverage of these laws has expanded significantly during the past 30 years.

Pedestrian and Bicycle Transportation Along Existing Roads—ActiveTrans Priority Tool Guidebook

July 14, 2015 Comments off

Pedestrian and Bicycle Transportation Along Existing Roads—ActiveTrans Priority Tool Guidebook
Source: Transportation Research Board

TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 803: Pedestrian and Bicycle Transportation Along Existing Roads—ActiveTrans Priority Tool Guidebook presents a tool and guidance that may be used to help prioritize improvements to pedestrian and bicycle facilities, either separately or together as part of a “complete streets” evaluation approach.

The guidebook is supplemented by a CD that contains a programmed spreadsheet to facilitate implementation of the ActiveTrans methodology, as well as a final report that documents the research approach, findings, and conclusions.

Preliminary Strategic Analysis of Next Generation Fare Payment Systems for Public Transportation

July 13, 2015 Comments off

Preliminary Strategic Analysis of Next Generation Fare Payment Systems for Public Transportation
Source: Transportation Research Board

TRB’s Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Report 177: Preliminary Strategic Analysis of Next Generation Fare Payment Systems for Public Transportation explores attributes, implementation strategies, and applications of next generation transit fare payment (NGFP) systems. The report documents the state of the practice of emerging fare payments options for public transportation; develops a typology of available and anticipated options for NGFP that can serve a broad range of transit agencies and stakeholders in the United States; and evaluates the pros and cons of the options presented in the typology.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,052 other followers