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Archive for the ‘sports, recreation, leisure’ Category

Targeting Investments To Cost Effectively Restore and Protect Wetland Ecosystems: Some Economic Insights

March 31, 2015 Comments off

Targeting Investments To Cost Effectively Restore and Protect Wetland Ecosystems: Some Economic Insights
Source: USDA Economic Research Service

The environmental benefits of restoring and preserving wetlands—including cleaner water, increases in wildlife populations, and carbon sequestration—as well as costs, depend on wetland type, land productivity, and the public’s desire for amenities, all of which depend on location. Findings show where wetland conservation funding might be targeted to maximize benefits relative to costs.

Gaming Careers: Gateway to the Middle Class

March 24, 2015 Comments off

Gaming Careers: Gateway to the Middle Class
Source: Oxford Economics/American Gaming Association

This new report produced by Oxford Economics in partnership with the American Gaming association explores how the United States’ casino gaming industry creates jobs and opportunities, promotes educational opportunitites, and supports the middle class.

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It’s More than Just a Game: The Effect of Core and Supplementary Services on Customer Loyalty

March 24, 2015 Comments off

It’s More than Just a Game: The Effect of Core and Supplementary Services on Customer Loyalty
Source: Cornell School of Hotel Administration, Center for Hospitality Research

All service providers seek to provide a comprehensive experience for their customers, with the goal of cementing customer loyalty and encouraging future purchases. In most services, we can identify core aspects (e.g., a good night’s sleep at a hotel) and supplementary aspects (e.g., concierge and valet services). For professional sports, the core service is the sporting contest itself, but many other supplementary services may also be included. We use a comprehensive dataset of over 7,000 patrons of a major professional sport in the United States to determine how customers’ satisfaction with core and supplementary services influence their intent to repeat a ticket purchase. We find that satisfaction with both core and supplementary services are important for loyal customers, but first-time customers tend to focus only on core service satisfaction when considering whether to purchase another ticket. One implication of this study is that firms should focus on their customers’ full experience. Firms must first focus on their core services and then augment them appropriately with supplementary services.

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Keeping Score When It Counts: Graduation Success and Academic Progress Rates for the 2015 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament Teams

March 23, 2015 Comments off

Keeping Score When It Counts: Graduation Success and Academic Progress Rates for the 2015 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament Teams (PDF)
Source: Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (University of Central Florida College of Business Administration)

The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida (UCF) released its annual study, “Keeping Score When It Counts: Graduation Success and Academic Progress Rates for the 2015 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament Teams.” This study provides the most comprehensive analysis of the academic performance of student-athletes on teams participating in the 2015 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament.

The study examined the Graduation Success Rates (GSR) and Academic Progress Rates (APR) for tournament teams as reported by the NCAA. This study also compared the graduation rate data of white and African-American male basketball student-athletes.

“There is good news to report as almost every category examined got better. The GSR numbers for white male basketball student-athletes increased from 89 percent in 2014 to 93 percent in 2015. The GSR for African-American male basketball student-athletes increased from 65 in 2014 to 69 percent in 2015.

However, the enormous gap between the graduation rates of white and African-American student-athletes in 2015 remained the same as 2014 at a terrible 24 percent.

See also: Keeping Score When It Counts: Academic Progress/Graduation Success Rate Study of 2015 NCAA Division I Men’s and Women’s Basketball Tournament Teams (PDF)

The UCI publishes Cycling Independent Reform Commission report

March 11, 2015 Comments off

The UCI publishes Cycling Independent Reform Commission report
Source: Union Cycliste Internationale

The Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) has today published the report and recommendations of the Cycling Independent Reform Commission (CIRC). The CIRC’s Terms of Reference were to investigate “the causes of the pattern of doping that developed within cycling and allegations which implicate the UCI and other governing bodies and officials over ineffective investigation of such practices”.

The CIRC was established by the UCI in January 2014 and has since completed a rigorous 13 month investigation wholly independent from the UCI. The CIRC was chaired by Dr. Dick Marty, a former Swiss State Prosecutor, supported by two Vice-Chairs – Prof. Ulrich Haas, an expert in anti-doping rules and procedures and Mr. Peter Nicholson, a former military officer who specialises in criminal investigations.

During its investigation, the CIRC undertook 174 face-to-face interviews, some of which lasted for several days and took place in different locations across the world. Those interviewed included UCI personnel, teams, federations, medical practitioners, riders/former riders, anti-doping organisations, national law enforcement agencies, sponsors, event organisers and journalists. A full list of interviewees who have agreed for their names to be disclosed is present on page 224 of the report.

“It is clear from reading this report that in the past the UCI suffered severely from a lack of good governance with individuals taking crucial decisions alone, many of which undermined anti-doping efforts; put itself in an extraordinary position of proximity to certain riders; and wasted a lot of its time and resources in open conflict with organisations such as the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and the US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA). It is also clear that the UCI leadership interfered in operational decisions on anti-doping matters and these factors, as well as many more covered in the report, served to erode confidence in the UCI and the sport.”

Superbowl Ads

March 6, 2015 Comments off

Superbowl Ads
Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business

We explore the effects of television advertising in the setting of the NFL’s Super Bowl telecast. The Super Bowl is the largest advertising event of the year and is well suited for measurement. The event has the potential to create significant increases in “brand capital” because ratings average over 40 percent of households and ads are a focal point of the broadcast. Furthermore, variation in exposures is exogenous because a brand cannot choose how many impressions it receives in each market. Viewership is determined based on local preferences for watching the two competing teams. With this significant and exogenous variation in Super Bowl advertising exposures we test whether advertisers’ sales are affected accordingly. We run our analysis using Nielsen ratings and store level sales data in the soda and beer categories. We find that Super Bowl ads can generate significant increases in revenue and volume per household. However, when two major soda brands both advertise, they receive no profit gain to offset their advertising investments. Exploring the mechanism behind the ad effects, we find that Super Bowl ads build an association between the brand and viewership of sports more broadly. The competitive effects suggest that two competing brands cannot however capture the same association. In beer, Budweiser has purchased exclusive advertising rights in the Super Bowl for more than 20 years and appears to be receiving long run returns from their ownership of a sports association.

Participation in Sport and Physical Recreation, Australia, 2013-14

February 20, 2015 Comments off

Participation in Sport and Physical Recreation, Australia, 2013-14
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Of the Australian population aged 15 years and over, an estimated 60% (11.1 million people) reported that they had participated in sport and physical recreation at least once during the 12 months prior to the interview in 2013–14, compared with 65% in 2011-12.

Participation generally decreased with age. People aged 15–17 years reported the highest participation rate in sport and physical recreation (74%), while people aged 65 years and over had the lowest (47%). Male and female participation rates were similar, except in the 25-34 age group where participation rates were higher for males (67%) than females (61%).

The highest participation rate for sport and physical recreation was in the Australian Capital Territory (73%), while the other states ranged from 54% in Queensland to 67% in Tasmania.

Walking for exercise was the most popular physical recreational activity, with 19% of people aged 15 years and over walking for exercise at least once in the 12 months prior to interview. Females were more likely to walk for exercise than males (25% and 14% respectively). Fitness and gym were the next most popular activity (17%) again with more females than males participating (19% and 16% respectively). Males were more likely than females to play golf (6.6% and 1.4% respectively) or participate in cycling and BMXing (8.5% and 4.0% respectively).

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