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Archive for the ‘sports, recreation, leisure’ Category

UK — Benefits of Investing in Cycling

October 31, 2014 Comments off

Benefits of Investing in Cycling (PDF)
Source: British Cycling

Investing in cycling will generate benefits for the whole country, not just those using a bike to get around. Eleven benefits are summarised here which can help solve a series of health, social and economic problems. This report shows how investing in cycling is good for our transport systems as a whole, for local economies, for social inclusion, and for public health.

Creating a cycling revolution in the UK requires sustained investment. In European countries with high cycling levels, levels of investment are also substantially higher than in the UK. The All-Party Parliamentary Cycling Inquiry has recommended a minimum of £10 annually per person, rising to £20, which would begin to approach the spending levels seen in high-cycling countries.

Investing in cycling will enable transport authorities to start putting in place the infrastructure we need to ensure people of all ages and abilities can choose to cycle for short everyday trips. As well as making cycle journeys more pleasant, safer and faster, it sends the signal that cycling is a normal way to travel. This is important because the perception of cycling as a marginal and minority mode is off-putting to many people.

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CRS — Heritage Areas: Background, Proposals, and Current Issues (September 8, 2014)

October 28, 2014 Comments off

Heritage Areas: Background, Proposals, and Current Issues (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via National Agricultural Law Center)

Over 30 years, Congress has established 49 national heritage areas (NHAs) to commemorate, conserve, and promote areas that include important natural, scenic, historic, cultural, and recreational resources. NHAs are partnerships among the National Park Service (NPS), states, and local communities, where the NPS supports state and local conservation through federal recognition, seed money, and technical assistance. NHAs are not part of the National Park System, where lands are federally owned and managed. Rather, lands within heritage areas typically remain in state, local, or private ownership or a combination thereof. Heritage areas have been supported as protecting lands and traditions and promoting tourism and community revitalization, but opposed as potentially burdensome, costly, or leading to federal control over nonfederal lands. This report focuses on heritage areas designated by Congress (not other entities) and related issues and legislation.

Too Busy for School? The Effect of Athletic Participation on Absenteeism

October 8, 2014 Comments off

Too Busy for School? The Effect of Athletic Participation on Absenteeism (PDF)
Source: Institute for the Study of Labor

While existing research supports that participation in high-school athletics is associated with better education and labour-market outcomes, the mechanisms through which these benefits accrue are not well established. We use data from a large public-school district to retrieve an estimate of the causal effect of high-school athletic participation on absenteeism. We show that active competition decreases absences, with most of the effect driven by reductions in unexcused absences – truancy among active male athletes declines significantly, with the effects larger in earlier grades and for black and Hispanic boys. Strong game-day effects are also evident, in both boys and girls, as truancy declines on game days are offset with higher rates of absenteeism the following day. Addressing the effects on academic performance, we find significant heterogeneity in the response to active athletic participation by race, gender and family structure, with boys not in dual-parent households exhibiting small academic improvements in semesters in which they experienced greater athletic participation.

FCC — Sports Blackouts (updated October 1, 2014)

October 7, 2014 Comments off

Sports Blackouts
Source: Federal Communications Commission

The Federal Communications Commission repealed its sports blackout rules, which prohibited cable and satellite operators from airing any sports event that was blacked out on a local broadcast station. This action removes Commission protection of the private blackout policies of sports leagues, which require local broadcast stations to black out a game if a team does not sell a certain percentage of tickets by a certain time prior to the game. Elimination of this rule, however, may not end all sports blackouts: sports leagues may choose to continue their private blackout policies through contractual arrangements with programming distributors. For more information read the news release.

A “sports blackout” occurs when a sports event that was scheduled to be televised is not aired in a particular media market. A blackout may prevent transmission of sports programming on local broadcast networks and/or non-broadcast platforms such as cable and satellite television.

Hat tip: PW

EU — Online gambling

October 7, 2014 Comments off

Online gambling
Source: European Parliamentary Research Service

The online gambling market is growing rapidly with betting being the biggest sector. National levels of demand vary across the EU. With an estimated 6.84 million consumers, in 2012 annual revenues were €10.54 billion.

CRS — Questions Raised About NFL’s Tax-Exempt Status, Legal Sidebar (September 17, 2014)

September 25, 2014 Comments off

Questions Raised About NFL’s Tax-Exempt Status, Legal Sidebar (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

With all the attention the National Football League (NFL) has received regarding its handling of several high-profile controversies, questions have arisen about the League’s tax status. The NFL is exempt from federal income taxes as an organization described in § 501(c)(6) of the Internal Revenue Code. (Note this applies only to the League—the teams are not tax-exempt).

U.S. Forest Service — Proposed Directive for Commercial Filming in Wilderness; Special Uses Administration

September 24, 2014 Comments off

Proposed Directive for Commercial Filming in Wilderness; Special Uses Administration
Source: U.S. Forest Service (via Federal Register)

ACTION
Notice Of Proposed Directive; Request For Public Comment.

SUMMARY
The Forest Service proposes to incorporate interim directive (ID) 2709.11-2013.1 into Forest Service Handbook (FSH) 2709.11, chapter 40 to make permanent guidance for the evaluation of proposals for still photography and commercial filming on National Forest System Lands. The proposed amendment would addressthe establishment of consistent national criteria to evaluate requests for special use permits on National Forest System (NFS) lands. Specifically, this policy provides the criteria used to evaluate request for special use permits related to still photography and commercial filming in congressionally designated wilderness areas. Public comment is invited and will be considered in the development of the final directive.

See: Forest Service says media needs photography permit in wilderness areas, alarming First Amendment advocates

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