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Archive for the ‘age and aging’ Category

Prevalence of Reduced Muscle Strength in Older U.S. Adults: United States, 2011–2012

January 30, 2015 Comments off

Prevalence of Reduced Muscle Strength in Older U.S. Adults: United States, 2011–2012
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings
Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011–2012

  • Five percent of adults aged 60 and over had weak muscle strength. Thirteen percent had intermediate muscle strength, while 82% had normal muscle strength.
  • The prevalence of reduced (weak and intermediate) muscle strength increased with age, while the prevalence of normal strength decreased with age.
  • Muscle strength status did not differ by sex, except among persons aged 80 and over, where women had a higher prevalence of weak muscle strength than men.
  • Non-Hispanic Asian and Hispanic persons had a higher prevalence of reduced muscle strength than non-Hispanic white persons.
  • Difficulty with rising from a chair increased as strength status decreased.

IRS — Accumulation and Distribution of Individual Retirement Arrangements, 2011–2012

January 28, 2015 Comments off

Accumulation and Distribution of Individual Retirement Arrangements, 2011–2012
Source: Internal Revenue Service

Twelve tables presenting statistics for taxpayers with individual retirement arrangements (six each for Tax Years 2011 and 2012) are now available. The tables are organized by adjusted gross income, age, and marital status. Information for both traditional and Roth IRAs is provided.

2011 Census Analysis: Do the Demographic and Socio-Economic Characteristics of those Living Alone in England and Wales Differ from the General Population?

January 27, 2015 Comments off

2011 Census Analysis: Do the Demographic and Socio-Economic Characteristics of those Living Alone in England and Wales Differ from the General Population?
Source: Office for National Statistics

This story analyses the characteristics of those living alone within the household population aged 16 and over, and the broader usually resident population, using data from the 2011 Census. Characteristics analysed include age and sex, housing tenure, qualifications and ethnicity. Geographical variations in those living alone are also highlighted.

How Does Aging Affect Financial Decision Making?

January 23, 2015 Comments off

How Does Aging Affect Financial Decision Making?
Source: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College

The brief’s key findings are:

  • With the shift from traditional pensions to 401(k) plans, the welfare of retirees depends increasingly on their ability to make sound financial decisions.
  • Using a dataset that follows a group of older individuals in the Chicago area, the analysis examines how aging affects financial decision making.
  • Participants who suffer cognitive decline experience a reduction in their financial literacy but no change in their confidence in managing their money.
  • Perhaps not surprisingly then, while they are more likely to get help with financial decisions, more than half retain primary responsibility for managing their money.

Sound credit scores and financial decisions despite cognitive aging

January 23, 2015 Comments off

Sound credit scores and financial decisions despite cognitive aging (PDF)
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

At a time when the world’s 65-and-older population will double by 2035, policy changes have transferred many complex financial and healthcare decisions to individuals. Age-related declines in cognitive ability raise the specter that older adults facing major financial decisions may find them increasingly challenging. We explore whether knowledge and expertise accumulated from past decisions can offset age-related cognitive declines. Using a unique dataset that combines measures of cognitive ability, knowledge, and credit scores—a measure of creditworthiness that reflects sustained ability for sound financial decision-making—we find that cognitive decline does not spell doom. Instead, domain-specific knowledge and expertise provide an alternative route to sound financial decisions. These results suggest guidelines for designing effective interventions and decision aids across the life span.

Hospitalizations for Patients Aged 85 and Over in the United States, 2000–2010

January 21, 2015 Comments off

Hospitalizations for Patients Aged 85 and Over in the United States, 2000–2010
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings
Data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey

  • In 2010, adults aged 85 and over accounted for only 2% of the U.S. population but 9% of hospital discharges.
  • From 2000 through 2010, the rate of hospitalizations for adults aged 85 and over declined from 605 to 553 hospitalizations per 1,000 population, a 9% decrease.
  • The rate of fractures and other injuries was higher for adults aged 85 and over (51 per 1,000 population) than for adults aged 65–74 (9 per 1,000 population) and 75–84 (23 per 1,000 population).
  • Adults aged 85 and over were less likely than those aged 65–74 and 75–84 to be discharged home and more likely to die in the hospital.

From 2000 through 2010, the number of adults aged 85 and over in the United States rose 31%, from 4.2 million to 5.5 million, and in 2010, this age group represented almost 14% of the population aged 65 and over (1). It is estimated that by 2050, more than 21% of adults over age 65 will be aged 85 and over (2). Given this increase, adults aged 85 and over are likely to account for an increasing share of hospital utilization and costs in the coming years (3). This report describes hospitalizations for adults aged 85 and over with comparisons to adults aged 65–74 and 75–84.

Contraception and Hormonal Management in the Perimenopause

January 21, 2015 Comments off

Contraception and Hormonal Management in the Perimenopause
Source: Journal of Women’s Health

This literature review focuses on contraception in perimenopausal women. As women age, their fecundity decreases but does not disappear until menopause. After age 40, 75% of pregnancies are unplanned and may result in profound physical and emotional impact. Clinical evaluation must be relied on to diagnose menopause, since hormonal levels fluctuate widely. Until menopause is confirmed, some potential for pregnancy remains; at age 45, women’s sterility rate is 55%. Older gravidas experience higher rates of diabetes, hypertension, and death.

Many safe and effective contraceptive options are available to perimenopausal women. In addition to preventing an unplanned and higher-risk pregnancy, perimenopausal contraception may improve abnormal uterine bleeding, hot flashes, and menstrual migraines. Long-acting reversible contraceptives, including the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS), the etonogestrel subdermal implant (ESI), and the copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD), provide high efficacy without estrogen. LNG-IUS markedly decreases menorrhagia commonly seen in perimenopause. Both ESI and LNG-IUS provide endometrial protection for women using estrogen for vasomotor symptoms. Women without cardiovascular risk factors can safely use combined hormonal contraception. The CDC’s Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use informs choices for women with comorbidities. No medical contraindications exist for levonorgestrel emergency-contraceptive pills, though obesity does decrease efficacy. In contrast, the Cu-IUD provides reliable emergency and ongoing contraception regardless of body mass index (BMI).

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