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Few teens use the most effective types of birth control

July 4, 2015 Comments off

Few teens use the most effective types of birth control
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Teen births continue to decline in the U.S., but still more than 273,000 infants were born to teens ages 15 to 19 in 2013. Childbearing during the teen years can carry health, economic, and social costs for mothers and their children.

The good news is that more teens are waiting to have sex, and of those who are sexually active, nearly 90 percent used birth control the last time they had sex. Data show that teens most often use condoms and birth control pills which, when not used consistently and correctly, are less effective for preventing pregnancy. According to this month’s Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, increasing access to Long-Acting Reversible Contraception (LARC) is one way to further reduce teen pregnancy.

T. Rowe Price: Millennial 401(K) Savers Have Better Financial Habits Than Baby Boomers

June 25, 2015 Comments off

T. Rowe Price: Millennial 401(K) Savers Have Better Financial Habits Than Baby Boomers
Source: T. Rowe Price

T. Rowe Price’s Retirement Saving & Spending Study revealed that a national sample of 1,505 millennials with 401(k)s have relatively good financial habits, particularly when compared with a national sample of 514 baby boomers with 401(k)s. While millennials are not saving at least 15% of their annual salary for retirement, as T. Rowe Price recommends, they recognize that saving for retirement is important and are interested in saving more.

More millennials than baby boomers track expenses carefully (75% vs. 64%) and stick to a budget (67% vs. 55%). And while baby boomers on average are saving a slightly higher percentage of their salary for retirement than millennials are saving, more millennials have increased their retirement savings within the past 12 months (40% vs. 21%). This suggests that they are acting in accordance with their financial priorities, as millennials ranked contributing to a 401(k) but below the match and paying down debt equally as their top priority.

Psychosocial Maturity and Desistance From Crime in a Sample of Serious Juvenile Offenders

June 23, 2015 Comments off

Psychosocial Maturity and Desistance From Crime in a Sample of Serious Juvenile Offenders (PDF)
Source: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

Highlights

The Pathways to Desistance study followed more than 1,300 serious juvenile offenders for 7 years after their conviction. In this bulletin, the authors present key findings on the link between psychosocial maturity and desistance from crime in the males in the Pathways sample as they transition from midadolescence to early adulthood (ages 14–25):

• Recent research indicates that youth experience protracted maturation, into their midtwenties, of brain systems responsible for self-regulation. This has stimulated interest in measuring young offenders’ psychosocial maturity into early adulthood.
• Youth whose antisocial behavior persisted into early adulthood were found to have lower levels of psychosocial maturity in adolescence and deficits in their development of maturity (i.e., arrested development) compared with other antisocial youth.
• The vast majority of juvenile offenders, even those who commit serious crimes, grow out of antisocial activity as they transition to adulthood. Most juvenile offending is, in fact, limited to adolescence.
• This study suggests that the process of maturing out of crime is linked to the process of maturing more generally, including the development of impulse control and future orientation.

Millennials and U.S. Foreign Policy: The Next Generation’s Attitudes toward Foreign Policy and War (and Why They Matter)

June 22, 2015 Comments off

Millennials and U.S. Foreign Policy: The Next Generation’s Attitudes toward Foreign Policy and War (and Why They Matter)
Source: Cato Institute

First, Millennials perceive the world as significantly less threatening than their elders do, and they view foreign policies to deal with potential threats with much less urgency. Second, Millennials are more supportive of international cooperation than prior generations. Millennials, for example, are far more likely to see China as a partner than a rival and to believe that cooperation, rather than confrontation, with China is the appropriate strategy for the United States. Finally, thanks in particular to the impact of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Millennials are also far less supportive of the use of military force and may have internalized a permanent case of”Iraq Aversion.”

The rise of the Millennial Generation portends significant changes in public expectations and increased support for a more restrained grand strategy. There is no reason, however, to expect that U.S. grand strategy will become particularly coherent under Millennial leadership. Millennials, like every generation, reflect significant partisan splits over core issues. In the absence of a unifying security threat, these partisan divides ensure that U.S.foreign policy will feature as much debate and dissensus in the future as it does today.

Life-Cycle Consumption Patterns at Older Ages in the US and the UK: Can Medical Expenditures Explain the Difference?

June 18, 2015 Comments off

Life-Cycle Consumption Patterns at Older Ages in the US and the UK: Can Medical Expenditures Explain the Difference?
Source: RAND Corporation

Our data indicate significantly steeper declines in nondurable expenditures in the UK compared to the US in spite of income paths at older ages exhibiting similar declines. We examine several possible causes, including different employment paths, housing ownership and expenses, levels and paths of health status, and out-of -pocket medical expenditures. Among all the factors we considered, we find that differences in levels, age paths, and uncertainty in medical expenses is the most likely reason for the steeper declines in nondurable expenses in the US compared to the UK.

Zeroing In on Place and Race

June 17, 2015 Comments off

Zeroing In on Place and Race
Source: Social Science Research Council

Zeroing In on Place and Race is an in-depth look at how disconnected youth are faring in America’s cities, with data included on disconnected youth by state, congressional district, county, gender, and by race and ethnicity. Disconnected youth are teenagers and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither working nor in school. There are 5,527,000 disconnected youth in America today, or one in seven young adults (13.8 percent)—about as many people as live in Minnesota. The national disconnected youth population is larger than the populations of thirty US states.

Is 65 the Best Cutoff for Defining “Older Americans?”

June 10, 2015 Comments off

Is 65 the Best Cutoff for Defining “Older Americans?”
Source: American Institutes for Research

Baby Boomers are aging and the Congress is changing; public policy issues on aging have never been more important. Do the issues that define “old age” really begin at 65? Although Americans are living longer, other changes in health status and workforce behavior could be used to argue that age 65 is too late to begin to worry about the challenges of an aging population.

Two key areas of concern when considering age from a policy perspective are the health and economic status (including labor force behavior) of older individuals. These variables affect not only the well-being of older Americans but the pocketbooks of American taxpayers. If age for program eligibility can be increased without harming older Americans, billions of dollars in government spending could potentially be saved.

In an effort to enlighten this debate, the Center on Aging developed this brief, in which AIR researchers explore data on income, resources, health, and family structure to look at how well age 65 captures a good cutoff for eligibility for programs and for discussing issues facing older Americans.

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