Archive

Archive for the ‘public opinion’ Category

Boomer Expectations for Retirement 2015 — Fifth Annual Update on the Retirement Preparedness of the Boomer Generation

April 22, 2015 Comments off

Boomer Expectations for Retirement 2015 — Fifth Annual Update on the Retirement Preparedness of the Boomer Generation (PDF)
Source: Insured Retirement Institute

Each year the Insured Retirement Institute (IRI) conducts a survey to measure the retirement preparedness of the Boomer generation. This report, the fifth in the series, summarizes the results of the 2015 survey and analyzes key changes over the past five years.

As Baby Boomers age, and as more members of the cohort are either in or very near retirement, the survey responses are changing. For an increasing number of Boomers, especially those that have not taken steps to plan effectively, retirement reality is not aligning with retirement expectations.

Overall satisfaction fell considerably in this year’s study, following a significant decline last year. However, respondents who have taken steps to prepare for retirement, such as working with financial advisors, calculating retirement goals, purchasing retirement income products such as annuities, and developing retirement plans report much higher levels of overall economic satisfaction and retirement preparedness. As we’ll see in the detailed study results, Boomers who have prepared, and have realistic expectations, for retirement are much more likely to report overall satisfaction, confidence in their retirement readiness, and progress toward a secure retirement.

Assessing the Political Impact of Immigration as the United Kingdom Heads to the Polls

April 9, 2015 Comments off

Assessing the Political Impact of Immigration as the United Kingdom Heads to the Polls
Source: Migration Policy Institute

Immigration has featured early in the opening week of the United Kingdom’s general election campaign, which officially began on March 30, 2015. Prime Minister David Cameron was pressed on the issue in a televised interview and the Labour Party was criticized for producing campaign mugs emblazoned with pledges to control immigration.

As voters head to the polls on May 7, it remains to be seen how central the often-roiled debate over migration will be in what is a deeply unsettled election year. Immigration is a key political issue, brought about through major changes in immigration patterns over the past two decades, significant policy changes that have failed to reassure the public, and the rise as a political force of the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP)—which has pressed for a temporary ban on new immigration. Paradoxically, immigration may have less visibility during the general election, given the issue is now political poison for the major parties.

Above all, this election cycle will determine the next stage in a long-running political fight: the question of the United Kingdom’s continued membership in the European Union and a possible voter referendum on the matter. Immigration and Europe have now become entangled in voters’ minds and it is likely that the issue of free movement within the European Union could be the determining factor for many voters in any such referendum.

This article briefly reviews the politics of immigration in the United Kingdom since 2010 before examining whether immigration will impact the election and exploring how immigration politics will develop in the future, particularly in regard to the United Kingdom’s place in Europe.

Four in 10 Americans Look Forward to Checking Mail

April 7, 2015 Comments off

Four in 10 Americans Look Forward to Checking Mail
Source: Gallup

In a world of email, texts and social media, 41% of Americans nevertheless look forward to checking what is in their mailbox each day. Americans 65 and older are more likely than younger adults to enjoy checking the mail, but 36% of Americans under 30 also feel this way.

Faith-Based Funding Backed, But Church-State Doubts Abound

April 7, 2015 Comments off

Faith-Based Funding Backed, But Church-State Doubts Abound
Source: Pew Research Center

As religion plays a more prominent role in public life, sharp divisions of opinion about the mixing of church and state are apparent. Most notably, while the public expresses strong support for the idea of faith-based groups receiving government funding to provide social services, in practice, it has many reservations. Most Americans would not extend that right to non-Judeo-Christian religious groups including: Muslim Americans, Buddhist Americans, Nation of Islam and the Church of Scientology. Many also have reservations about allowing the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints — the Mormons — to apply for federal funding to offer social services.

Beyond which religions are acceptable, strong concerns are expressed about what government might do to religion and what religious groups might do to the people they are trying to help. On the one hand, fully 68% worry that faith- based initiatives might lead to too much government involvement with religious organizations. On the other, six-in-ten express concerns that religious groups would proselytize among recipients of social services, and about the same percentage would prohibit groups that encourage religious conversion from receiving government funds. Americans have an even bigger problem with government-funded religious organizations hiring only those people who share their beliefs — 78% oppose that concept.

Screen Wars: The Battle for Eye Space in a TV-Everywhere World

April 3, 2015 Comments off

Screen Wars: The Battle for Eye Space in a TV-Everywhere World
Source: Nielsen

We are living in a world of 24/7 connectivity. We access content on our own terms, and we like it that way. Across the globe, more than three quarters (76%) of respondents in a Nielsen online survey of digital attitudes and behaviors say they enjoy the freedom of being connected anywhere, anytime. While this flexibility can be a benefit to us, it represents a huge challenge for brands and content providers vying for our attention.

While media fragmentation is happening across all formats, the “Screen Wars” report focuses on video programming, which we define as any type of content, such as TV, cable shows, professional video or user-generated content, that is watched on your TV, PC, mobile phone, tablet or e-reader device. The Nielsen Global Digital Landscape Survey polled 30,000 online respondents in 60 countries to understand how the changing digital landscape is affecting how, where and why we watch video programming. We also examine consumption preferences for video programming, including the devices most commonly used for selected genres and the devices used to view video at home and on the go.

free registration required2

Internet Seen as Positive Influence on Education but Negative on Morality in Emerging and Developing Nations

April 1, 2015 Comments off

Internet Seen as Positive Influence on Education but Negative on Morality in Emerging and Developing Nations
Source: Pew Research Center

As more people around the world gain access to all the tools of the digital age, the internet will play a greater role in everyday life. And so far, people in emerging and developing nations say that the increasing use of the internet has been a good influence in the realms of education, personal relationships and the economy. But despite all the benefits of these new technologies, on balance people are more likely to say that the internet is a negative rather than a positive influence on morality, and they are divided about its effect on politics.

How Much Will It Cost? How Americans Use Prices in Health Care

April 1, 2015 Comments off

How Much Will It Cost? How Americans Use Prices in Health Care
Source: Public Agenda

As Americans shoulder more health care costs, Public Agenda research suggests that many are hungry for more and better price information. However, some obstacles remain to increasing the number of Americans who compare prices before getting care. This research was supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and findings are based on a nationally representative survey of 2,010 adults conducted in 2014, along with focus groups and follow-up interviews.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,033 other followers