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Archive for the ‘adoption and foster care’ Category

HHS OIG — Not All Children in Foster Care Who Were Enrolled in Medicaid Received Required Health Screenings

March 4, 2015 Comments off

Not All Children in Foster Care Who Were Enrolled in Medicaid Received Required Health Screenings
Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General

Nearly a third of children in foster care who were enrolled in Medicaid did not receive at least one required health screening. Furthermore, just over a quarter of children in foster care who were enrolled in Medicaid received at least one required screening late. Moreover, ACF’s reviews do not ensure that children in foster care receive the required screenings according to State schedules.

Factsheets for Families: Parenting Your Adopted Preschooler

February 19, 2015 Comments off

Factsheets for Families: Parenting Your Adopted Preschooler
Source: Child Welfare Information Gateway

This factsheet is designed to help adoptive parents understand their preschooler’s developmental needs. It also provides practical strategies to promote a warm and loving parent-child relationship based on honesty and trust. It offers information on development, talking about adoption, and appropriate discipline.

See also: Factsheets for Families: Parenting Your Adopted School-Age Child

Domestic and International Adoption: Strategies to Improve Behavioral Health Outcomes for Youth and Their Families

February 17, 2015 Comments off

Domestic and International Adoption: Strategies to Improve Behavioral Health Outcomes for Youth and Their Families (PDF)
Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Summarizes data shared during a two-day interagency meeting hosted by SAMHSA in August 2012 to discuss science, policy, and practice related to the behavioral health challenges of children who have been adopted.

Finding families for children in foster care

January 26, 2015 Comments off

Finding families for children in foster care
Source: Child Trends

One factor that may facilitate a successful reunification of children in foster care with their parents—or failing that, provide an alternate route to permanency through adoption or guardianship—is children’s connections with extended family. However, because foster care frequently disrupts social connections, practitioners may need to take extra steps to help children maintain or re-establish these connections. The Family Finding model provides child welfare practitioners with intensive search and engagement techniques to identify family members and other adults close to a child in foster care, and to involve these adults in developing and carrying out a plan for the emotional and legal permanency of the child. This report reviews the results from 13 evaluations of Family Finding that have been released over the past two years.

Health Outcomes in Young Adults From Foster Care and Economically Diverse Backgrounds

November 14, 2014 Comments off

Health Outcomes in Young Adults From Foster Care and Economically Diverse Backgrounds
Source: Pediatrics

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:
Foster youth have high rates of health problems in childhood. Little work has been done to determine whether they are similarly vulnerable to increased health problems once they transition to adulthood. We sought to prospectively evaluate the risk of cardiovascular risk factors and other chronic conditions among young adults formerly in foster care (FC) and young adults from economically insecure (EI) and economically secure (ES) backgrounds in the general population.

METHODS:
We used data from the Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth (FC group; N = 596) and an age-matched sample from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (EI and ES groups; N = 456 and 1461, respectively). After controlling for covariates, we performed multivariate regressions to evaluate health outcomes and care access by group at 2 time points (baseline at late adolescence, follow-up at 25–26 years).

RESULTS:
Data revealed a consistent pattern of graduated increase in odds of most health outcomes, progressing from ES to EI to FC groups. Health care access indicators were more variable; the FC group was most likely to report having Medicaid or no insurance but was least likely to report not getting needed care in the past year.

CONCLUSIONS:
Former foster youth appear to have a higher risk of multiple chronic health conditions, beyond that which is associated with economic insecurity. Findings may be relevant to policymakers and practitioners considering the implementation of extended insurance and foster care programs and interventions to reduce health disparities in young adulthood.

CRS — Child Welfare: Profiles of Current and Former Older Foster Youth Based on the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) (October 6, 2014)

November 12, 2014 Comments off

Child Welfare: Profiles of Current and Former Older Foster Youth Based on the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

Congress has long been concerned with the well-being of older youth in foster care and those who have recently emancipated from care without going to a permanent home. Research on this population is fairly limited, and the few studies that are available have focused on youth in a small number of states. This research has generally found that youth who spend time in foster care during their teenage years tend to have difficulty as they enter adulthood and beyond.

The Chafee Foster Care Independence Act (P.L. 106-169), enacted in 1999, specified that state child welfare agencies provide additional supports to youth transitioning from foster care under the newly created Chafee Foster Care Independence Program (CFCIP). The law also directed the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which administers child welfare programs, to consult with stakeholders to develop a national data system on the number, characteristics, and outcomes of current and former foster youth. In response to these requirements, HHS created the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) under a final rule promulgated in 2008. The rule requires that each state child welfare agency commence collecting and reporting the data beginning in FY2011 (October 1, 2010).

This report provides summary and detailed data about current and former foster youth, as reported by states to HHS via the NYTD.

Health Issues for Judges to Consider for Children in Foster Care

September 26, 2014 Comments off

Health Issues for Judges to Consider for Children in Foster Care (PDF)
Source: American Academy of Pediatrics

Children in foster care have a host of unmet health needs, including not only physical health, but also mental, developmental and behavioral, and dental health needs. Addressing these health needs, as well as educational needs, improves children’s overall wellbeing, increases placement stability, and increases the likelihood of a child achieving permanency in a loving and supportive family situation.

Juvenile court judges are uniquely able to influence the health and well-being of children in foster care by asking about a child’s health status and special needs, ordering appropriate assessments and services, and ensuring that identified needs are addressed through the child’s court-ordered case plan. Judges can require that attorneys, caseworkers, and caregivers bring detailed information about a child’s health to court.

This booklet provides an overview of important health issues for children and youth in foster care. The appendix provides 3 downloadable age-appropriate forms that judges share with case workers or caregivers to obtain, record, and track relevant health information for individual children, thus improving outcomes for children and youth in foster care.

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