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Rethink What You “Know” About High-Achieving Women

December 16, 2014 Comments off

Rethink What You “Know” About High-Achieving Women
Source: Harvard Business Review

As researchers who have spent more than 20 years studying professional women, we have watched with interest the recent surge in attention paid to women’s careers, work-family conflict, and the gender gap in leadership. Among the most visible contributions to this public conversation have been Anne-Marie Slaughter’s 2012 Atlantic article “Why Women Still Can’t Have it All” and Sheryl Sandberg’s book Lean In, both of which ignited fierce public debate.

A lot of ink has been spilled on these topics, and both individuals and organizations have focused on gender gaps in business and other sectors. Can anything more be said? The 50th anniversary of the admission of women to Harvard Business School’s MBA program inspired us to find out—specifically, to learn what HBS graduates had to say about work and family and how their experiences, attitudes, and decisions might shed light on prevailing controversies.

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PDF Accessibility: Regulations, Risks, Solutions for Compliance

December 9, 2014 Comments off

PDF Accessibility: Regulations, Risks, Solutions for Compliance
Source: American Banker

Financial and other institutions are required to provide customer documents in accessible formats. This white paper, co-authored with the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB), discusses applicable legislation and recent litigation cases. It also suggests best practices for compliance and for providing accessible account statements and other electronic documents to customers with vision loss. In conclusion, the paper focuses on a solution for overcoming the challenges associated with meeting document accessibility requirements.

Free registration required.

36 Presidents of Private Colleges Earned More Than $1-Million in 2012 (12/8/14)

December 8, 2014 Comments off

36 Presidents of Private Colleges Earned More Than $1-Million in 2012
Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

Three dozen private-college presidents earned more than $1-million in 2012, with the typical leader making close to $400,000, a Chronicle analysis has found.

The millionaire club increased by one from the year before, and the median pay rose by 2.5 percent.

The highest-paid leader was Shirley Ann Jackson of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Ms. Jackson, who has regularly ranked in the top 25, earned just over $7.1-million, up from nearly $1.1-million in 2011. A large portion of her 2012 earnings came from a payout of almost $5.9-million that had been set aside over 10 years as a retention incentive.

No. 2 on the list, John L. Lahey of Quinnipiac University, made close to $3.8-million in 2012. That included about $2.8-million in compensation that had been set aside in previous years.

The top-10 list featured some familiar names, including the highest-paid Ivy League president, Lee C. Bollinger of Columbia University, at nearly $3.4-million, and John E. Sexton of New York University, at just over $1.4-million.

11 No-Fly Zones in the United States

November 26, 2014 Comments off

11 No-Fly Zones in the United States
Source: AllGov.com

For every sensible decision the government makes, there are others that cause plenty of head scratching.

Look at the number—and selections—of no-fly zones in place around the United States. Eleven of them discussed at the website Mental Floss represent a mix of locations, some of which make complete sense.

Planes flying over Washington, D.C., are limited to certain commercial and other pre-approved flights up to an altitude of 18,000 feet. These restrictions came after the 9/11 attacks in the run-up to the Iraq war and are aimed at protecting federal government installations.

The same logic can be applied to the Pantex nuclear facility outside Amarillo, Texas. The Cold War-era facility handles all kinds of nuclear warheads, so it requires special protection from above. Likewise, the Naval Submarine Base in Kings Bay, Georgia that serves as the home port of the U.S. Atlantic fleet of Trident nuclear subs has a no-fly zone above it.

Other government installations covered by overflight restrictions are the Kennedy Space Center and the famed Area 51 in Nevada, which has long been a classified government facility for, well, no one truly knows what.

The sky over Camp David is also off-limits to aircraft. Again, makes sense considering it is a popular getaway and meeting place for the president and special guests, including foreign leaders. Another presidential-related area that has been declared off limits to air traffic below 1,000 feet is the Bush family compound near Kennebunkport, Maine.

But then there’s restricted airspace over Disneyland and Disney World. The restrictions below 3,000 feet were slipped into a 2003 spending bill. Disney has fought off previous attempts to remove them because it doesn’t want banner planes flying over its parks.

2014 CreditCards.com Penalty Rate Survey: The price of being late

November 24, 2014 Comments off

2014 CreditCards.com Penalty Rate Survey: The price of being late
SOurce: CreditCards.com

Those who fall 60 days behind in credit card payments face an average penalty interest rate of 28.45 percent, according to CreditCards.com’s survey of major 100 U.S. credit cards.

That’s down slightly from a 28.60 percent average penalty APR in 2012 — but still expensive.

For example, consider a cardholder who carries a $4,000 balance on a card charging 11.82 percent — the average APR for those carrying a balance, according to the Federal Reserve. At the 28.45 percent average penalty rate, the cardholder would have to pay an extra $665.20 in interest a yea

The World’s 100 Most InDemand Employers: 2014

November 4, 2014 Comments off

The World’s 100 Most InDemand Employers: 2014
Source: LinkedIn

The most sought-after employers in the World based on billions of interactions from LinkedIn’s 300M+ members

Tons of Toilets: Which City Sits Atop the Throne?

October 22, 2014 Comments off

Tons of Toilets: Which City Sits Atop the Throne?
Source: Redfin

Using census and housing data, we calculated which cities had the most residential toilets per person and we had a clear winner: Boulder, Colorado. Boulder is the only city with more residential toilets than actual people. For every 100 Boulderites, there are an estimated 102 residential toilets. That’s 305,200 total toilets, which use 5,341,000 gallons of water per day (for more on water use, see our chart and infographic below). In other words, if you’re home shopping in Boulder and can’t find a three-bedroom home with three bathrooms, you’re doing something wrong.

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