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When Online Dating Partners Meet Offline: The Effect of Modality Switching on Relational Communication Between Online Daters

September 22, 2014 Comments off

When Online Dating Partners Meet Offline: The Effect of Modality Switching on Relational Communication Between Online Daters
Source: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

Despite the popularity of online dating sites, little is known about what occurs when online dating partners choose to communicate offline. Drawing upon the modality switching perspective, the present study assessed a national sample of online daters to determine whether face-to-face (FtF) relational outcomes could be predicted by the amount of online communication prior to the initial FtF meeting. Results were consistent with the hypothesized curvilinear relationship between the amount of online communication and perceptions of relational messages (intimacy, composure, informality, social orientation), forecasts of the future of the relationship, and information seeking behavior when meeting their partner FtF. The results provide support for the modality switching perspective, and offer important insight for online daters.

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Habitual Facebook Use and its Impact on Getting Deceived on Social Media

September 19, 2014 Comments off

Habitual Facebook Use and its Impact on Getting Deceived on Social Media
Source: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

There are a billion Facebook users worldwide with some individuals spending 8 hours each day on the platform. Limited research has, however, explored the consequences of such overuse. Even less research has examined the misuse of social media by criminals who are increasingly using social media to defraud individuals through phishing-type attacks. The current study focuses on Facebook habits and its determinants and the extent to which they ultimately influence individual susceptibility to social media phishing attacks. The results suggest that habitual Facebook use, founded on the individual frequently using Facebook, maintaining a large social network, and being deficient in their ability to regulate such behaviors, is the single biggest predictor of individual victimization in social media attacks.

The Communicative Functions of Emoticons in Workplace E-Mails: :-)

January 23, 2014 Comments off

The Communicative Functions of Emoticons in Workplace E-Mails: :-)
Source: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

CMC research presents emoticons as visual representations of writers’ emotions. We argue that the emoticons in authentic workplace e-mails do not primarily indicate writers’ emotions. Rather, they provide information about how an utterance is supposed to be interpreted. We show that emoticons function as contextualization cues, which serve to organize interpersonal relations in written interaction. They serve 3 communicative functions. First, when following signatures, emoticons function as markers of a positive attitude. Second, when following utterances that are intended to be interpreted as humorous, they are joke/irony markers. Third, they are hedges: when following expressive speech acts (such as thanks, greetings, etc.) they function as strengtheners and when following directives (such as requests, corrections, etc.) they function as softeners.

The “Nasty Effect:” Online Incivility and Risk Perceptions of Emerging Technologies

October 30, 2013 Comments off

The “Nasty Effect:” Online Incivility and Risk Perceptions of Emerging Technologies
Source: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

Uncivil discourse is a growing concern in American rhetoric, and this trend has expanded beyond traditional media to online sources, such as audience comments. Using an experiment given to a sample representative of the U.S. population, we examine the effects online incivility on perceptions toward a particular issue—namely, an emerging technology, nanotechnology. We found that exposure to uncivil blog comments can polarize risk perceptions of nanotechnology along the lines of religiosity and issue support.

That’s Not the Way It Is: How User-Generated Comments on the News Affect Perceived Media Bias

September 25, 2013 Comments off

That’s Not the Way It Is: How User-Generated Comments on the News Affect Perceived Media Bias
Source: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

This study investigated if user-generated comments on Internet news sites affect readers’ inferences about public opinion, and subsequently, their perceptions of media bias, and how ego-involvement moderates such effects. Supporting the notion that hostile media perception (HMP) stems from defensive processing, those who read others’ comments discordant (vs. concordant) with their own opinion believed that the public was against their position and perceived the news report to be more hostile and partial in its coverage, but such effects were limited to those with higher ego-involvement. Readers’ comments also had a direct effect on HMP among more involved individuals, without altering their perceptions of public opinion, suggesting that people might misattribute the opinions expressed in others’ comments to the news article.

Gender and the Use of Exclamation Points in Computer-Mediated Communication: An Analysis of Exclamations Posted to Two Electronic Discussion Lists

October 14, 2011 Comments off

Gender and the Use of Exclamation Points in Computer-Mediated Communication: An Analysis of Exclamations Posted to Two Electronic Discussion Lists
Source: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

Past research has reported that females use exclamation points more frequently than do males. Such research often characterizes exclamation points as “markers of excitability,” a term that suggests instability and emotional randomness, yet it has not necessarily examined the contexts in which exclamation points appeared for evidence of “excitability.” The present study uses a 16-category coding frame in a content analysis of 200 exclamations posted to two electronic discussion groups serving the library and information science profession. The results indicate that exclamation points rarely function as markers of excitability in these professional forums, but may function as markers of friendly interaction, a finding with implications for understanding gender styles in email and other forms of computer-mediated communication.

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