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Archive for the ‘Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication’ Category

How to be a gamer! Exploring personal and social indicators of gamer identity

February 23, 2015 Comments off

How to be a gamer! Exploring personal and social indicators of gamer identity
Source: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

Over the past decades, digital games have continued to extend their audience as they moved into the cultural mainstream. Despite this fact, however, only a portion of those who play games consider themselves a gamer. Drawing on insights from social identity theory, this study explores the factors that contribute to why people attribute a gamer identity to self or others. It does so by considering 2 sites of identity construction: the social context of players and the broader cultural milieu. Results suggest that a gamer identity is first and foremost associated with stereotypical behaviors that find their origin in a consumption logic. Friendship networks, however, provide an important environment in which a gamer identity can be performed.

The Extended iSelf: The Impact of iPhone Separation on Cognition, Emotion, and Physiology

January 13, 2015 Comments off

The Extended iSelf: The Impact of iPhone Separation on Cognition, Emotion, and Physiology (PDF)
Source: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

This study uniquely examined the effects on self, cognition, anxiety, and physiology when iPhone users are unable to answer their iPhone while performing cognitive tasks. A 2 x 2 within-subjects experiment was conducted. Participants (N = 40 iPhone users) completed 2 word search puzzles. Among the key findings from this study were that when iPhone users were unable to answer their ringing iPhone during a word search puzzle, heart rate and blood pressure increased, self-reported feelings of anxiety and unpleasantness increased, and self-reported extended self and cognition decreased. These findings suggest that negative psychological and physiological outcomes are associated with iPhone separation and the inability to answer one’s ringing iPhone during cognitive tasks. Implications of these findings are discussed.

Evaluating the Wisdom of Strangers: The Perceived Credibility of Online Consumer Reviews on Yelp

October 9, 2014 Comments off

Evaluating the Wisdom of Strangers: The Perceived Credibility of Online Consumer Reviews on Yelp
Source: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communications

This study examined the effects of review valence, the reviewer profile, and the receiver’s familiarity with the platform (user/nonuser) on the perceived credibility of a review on Yelp.com and on the receiver’s attitude toward the reviewed object. The results demonstrated a difference in cue-taking between users and nonusers. For users, there was an interaction effect of 2 profile cues (number of friends and number of reviews) on competence. Users interpreted the cues in combination, whereas non-users were not influenced by them. The friends × reviews × platform familiarity interaction indirectly affected attitude through competence. Further, review valence was positively associated with perceived credibility and attitude. The findings support and extend the social information processing theory and cue combination literature.

When Online Dating Partners Meet Offline: The Effect of Modality Switching on Relational Communication Between Online Daters

September 22, 2014 Comments off

When Online Dating Partners Meet Offline: The Effect of Modality Switching on Relational Communication Between Online Daters
Source: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

Despite the popularity of online dating sites, little is known about what occurs when online dating partners choose to communicate offline. Drawing upon the modality switching perspective, the present study assessed a national sample of online daters to determine whether face-to-face (FtF) relational outcomes could be predicted by the amount of online communication prior to the initial FtF meeting. Results were consistent with the hypothesized curvilinear relationship between the amount of online communication and perceptions of relational messages (intimacy, composure, informality, social orientation), forecasts of the future of the relationship, and information seeking behavior when meeting their partner FtF. The results provide support for the modality switching perspective, and offer important insight for online daters.

Habitual Facebook Use and its Impact on Getting Deceived on Social Media

September 19, 2014 Comments off

Habitual Facebook Use and its Impact on Getting Deceived on Social Media
Source: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

There are a billion Facebook users worldwide with some individuals spending 8 hours each day on the platform. Limited research has, however, explored the consequences of such overuse. Even less research has examined the misuse of social media by criminals who are increasingly using social media to defraud individuals through phishing-type attacks. The current study focuses on Facebook habits and its determinants and the extent to which they ultimately influence individual susceptibility to social media phishing attacks. The results suggest that habitual Facebook use, founded on the individual frequently using Facebook, maintaining a large social network, and being deficient in their ability to regulate such behaviors, is the single biggest predictor of individual victimization in social media attacks.

The Communicative Functions of Emoticons in Workplace E-Mails: :-)

January 23, 2014 Comments off

The Communicative Functions of Emoticons in Workplace E-Mails: :-)
Source: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

CMC research presents emoticons as visual representations of writers’ emotions. We argue that the emoticons in authentic workplace e-mails do not primarily indicate writers’ emotions. Rather, they provide information about how an utterance is supposed to be interpreted. We show that emoticons function as contextualization cues, which serve to organize interpersonal relations in written interaction. They serve 3 communicative functions. First, when following signatures, emoticons function as markers of a positive attitude. Second, when following utterances that are intended to be interpreted as humorous, they are joke/irony markers. Third, they are hedges: when following expressive speech acts (such as thanks, greetings, etc.) they function as strengtheners and when following directives (such as requests, corrections, etc.) they function as softeners.

The “Nasty Effect:” Online Incivility and Risk Perceptions of Emerging Technologies

October 30, 2013 Comments off

The “Nasty Effect:” Online Incivility and Risk Perceptions of Emerging Technologies
Source: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

Uncivil discourse is a growing concern in American rhetoric, and this trend has expanded beyond traditional media to online sources, such as audience comments. Using an experiment given to a sample representative of the U.S. population, we examine the effects online incivility on perceptions toward a particular issue—namely, an emerging technology, nanotechnology. We found that exposure to uncivil blog comments can polarize risk perceptions of nanotechnology along the lines of religiosity and issue support.

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