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CA — Employment Insurance Financing

March 30, 2015 Comments off

Employment Insurance Financing
Source: Library of Parliament

Employment Insurance (EI) is one of the largest programs administered by the federal government, with expenditures of $19 billion in 2013–2014, most of it ($15 billion) as benefits paid to workers who are unemployed for a variety of reasons.

The way this program is financed has changed frequently over the years. The following analysis is therefore divided into three parts:

  • a summary of the current situation, with some components dating back to 2009;
  • a brief overview of the changes expected to the program in the coming years; and
  • a review of financing developments prior to 2009 to provide context.

More than 52,000 Canadians left the country for medical care in 2014

March 30, 2015 Comments off

More than 52,000 Canadians left the country for medical care in 2014
Source: Fraser Institute

Large numbers of Canadians continue to venture abroad to seek medical care, according to a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

The study, Leaving Canada for Medical Care, 2015, estimates 52,513 Canadians left the country to receive non-emergency medical treatment in 2014, an increase of 26 per cent compared to the previous year.

The study draws upon data from the Fraser Institute’s annual Waiting Your Turn study – a national survey of physicians across Canada in 12 major medical specialties. In the 2014 survey, physicians specializing in internal medicine procedures — such as colonoscopies, gastroscopies and angiographies — reported the highest number of patients leaving Canada for treatment (6,559). Meanwhile, neurosurgeons reported the highest proportion of patients (2.6 per cent) who travelled abroad for medical care.

CA — Are Female Baby Boomers Ready for Retirement?

March 27, 2015 Comments off

Are Female Baby Boomers Ready for Retirement?
Source: University of Waterloo

Due to their life-course socio-economic conditions, many female boomers may suffer large decreases in well-being as they head into retirement. Pension reforms which increase retirement age will disproportionately disadvantage those already in low income. While changes to the CPP will reduce losses from poor or sporadic labour force participation, these changes are too late to help the early boomer women. Likewise, while research suggests that improving retirement outcomes must begin with improved labour market conditions, inequitable conditions persist. Therefore, any current policy change will miss helping the early boomers. Finally, with increasing rates of chronic disease and longer lifespans, policy must aim toward health and wellness promotion, providing a wider range of integrated care options, and clear estimates of added costs so that Canadians can adequately prepare for retirement.

Open Data in the G8

March 26, 2015 Comments off

Open Data in the G8
Source: Center for Data Innovation

In 2013, the leaders of the G8 signed an agreement committing to advance open data in their respective countries. This report assesses the current state of open data efforts in these countries and finds substantial variation in their progress. Moving forward, countries have many opportunities to enhance their open data capabilities, such as by increasing international collaboration, better educating policymakers about the benefits of open data, and working closely with civil society on open data initiatives.

CA — Wage Watch. A comparison of public-sector and private-sector wages

March 24, 2015 Comments off

Wage Watch. A comparison of public-sector and private-sector wages
Source: Canadian Federation of Independent Business

The broad public sector is a major employer in Canada. As a group, it employs 3.6 million Canadians—more than one job in five. Because the large share of these jobs are supported in whole or in part by tax revenues, it is certainly appropriate to question how representative and appropriate public sector salaries are in relation to private sector norms. Latest findings based on the 2011 National Household Survey, which represents earnings from 2010, show a continued and substantial gap in salary compensation in favour of government or public sector employees—even after adjustments for differences in occupation mix, age and education. The gaps grow even wider once employment benefits such as working hours and pensions are taken into account.The impacts on the public purse are significant, adding almost $20 billion to the hard costs of compensating the public sector in 2010.

Family violence in Canada: A statistical profile, 2013

March 19, 2015 Comments off

Family violence in Canada: A statistical profile, 2013 (PDF)
Source: Statistics Canada

There were just under 88,000 victims of family violence in Canada in 2013, according to police-reported data. This represented more than one-quarter of all violent crimes reported to police.

Just under half (48%) of all victims of family violence were victimized by a current or former spouse. For another 17% of family violence victims, the accused was a parent, while for 14% the accused was an extended family member such as an in-law, uncle or grandparent. A further 11% of family violence victims were victimized by a sibling and for 10% the accused was the victim’s own child.

As in previous years, a majority of police-reported incidents of family violence involved physical assault, which included actions and behaviours such as pushing, slapping, punching and face-to-face threats.

Police-reported data also reveal that in 2013 almost 7 in 10 family violence victims were female. In comparison, females represented 46% of victims of violent crimes that were not family-related. The over-representation of female victims was most prominent in the spousal violence category, where nearly 8 in 10 victims were female.

Rates of police-reported family violence varied by age. Among females, family violence victimization rates were generally highest for those in their thirties. However, for male victims, rates of family violence were highest for 15- to 19-year-olds. Seniors (aged 65 and over) recorded the lowest rates of police-reported family violence of any age group, regardless of gender.

Supreme Court of Canada — Statistics 2004 to 2014

March 17, 2015 Comments off

Supreme Court of Canada — Statistics 2004 to 2014
Source: Supreme Court of Canada

This report sets out a statistical view of the work of the Supreme Court of Canada in 2014 with comparisons to the previous ten years’ work.

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