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CA — Despite dramatic increase in oil tanker traffic, number of oil spills has significantly decreased

January 21, 2015 Comments off

Health Canada Publishes Findings From Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study

January 13, 2015 Comments off

Health Canada Publishes Findings From Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study
Source: Health Canada

Today, Health Canada published findings from the Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study. Launched in 2012, in collaboration with Statistics Canada, this study explored the relationship between exposure to wind turbine noise and the health effects reported by, and measured in, people living near wind turbines.

In the effort of being more open and transparent, the findings are available on Health Canada’s website. The findings provide a more complete overall assessment of the potential impacts that exposure to wind turbines may have on health and well-being.

No evidence was found to support a link between exposure to wind turbine noise and any of the self-reported or measured health endpoints examined. However, the study did demonstrate a relationship between increasing levels of wind turbine noise and annoyance towards several features (including noise, vibration, shadow flicker, and the aircraft warning lights on top of the turbines) associated with wind turbines.

It is important to note that the findings from this study do not provide definitive answers on their own and must be considered in the context of a broader evidence base.

Consumer Cash Usage: A Cross-Country Comparison with Payment Diary Survey Data

January 6, 2015 Comments off

Consumer Cash Usage: A Cross-Country Comparison with Payment Diary Survey Data
Source: Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

We measure consumers’ use of cash by harmonizing payment diary surveys from seven countries. The seven diary surveys were conducted in 2009 (Canada), 2010 (Australia), 2011 (Austria, France, Germany, and the Netherlands), and 2012 (the United States). Our paper finds cross-country differences — for example, the level of cash use differs across countries. Cash has not disappeared as a payment instrument, especially for low-value transactions. We also find that the use of cash is strongly correlated with transaction size, demographics, and point-of-sale characteristics such as merchant card acceptance and venue.

Violence perpetrated by ex-spouses in Canada

December 30, 2014 Comments off

Violence perpetrated by ex-spouses in Canada
Source: Justice Canada

Intimate partner violence affects the lives of many Canadians. In 2011, there were 97,451 victims of police-reported intimate partner violence1 (Sinha 2013) with women representing 80% of the victims of police-reported intimate partner violence in 2011.

While these numbers provide some insight into the prevalence of spousal violence2 in Canada, it only reflects a small portion of the actual violence that occurs. Data from the 2009 General Social Survey – Victimization (GSS) found that only 22% of victims of self-reported spousal violence reported the incident to the police (Brennan 2011). These numbers also do not provide information on the prevalence of violence perpetrated by ex-spouses, nor the experiences of victims of ex-spousal violence

Canada — Taking the “temporary” out of the TFW program

December 10, 2014 Comments off

Taking the “temporary” out of the TFW program
Source: Canadian Federation of Independent Business

In a new report released today, the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) calls for the Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP) to be replaced with a stronger solution to address permanent labour shortages. Geared towards entry-level workers, CFIB’s proposed Introduction to Canada Visa would simultaneously address critical shortages for small businesses while providing a clear path to permanent residence for foreign workers.

Mental Health of the Canadian Armed Forces

December 3, 2014 Comments off

Mental Health of the Canadian Armed Forces (PDF)
Source: Statistics Canada

Highlights
• In 2013, about 1 in 6 full-time Regular Force members of the Canadian Armed Forces reported symptoms of at least one of the following disorders: major depressive episode, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and alcohol abuse or dependence.
• Depression was the most common disorder with 8.0% of Regular Force members reporting symptoms in the past 12 months.
• The 12-month rates for post-traumatic stress disorder and panic disorder were twice as high among Regular Force members who had been deployed in support of the mission in Afghanistan compared to those who had not.
• Between 2002 and 2013 the rate of depression among Regular Force members has not changed, while the rates of post-traumatic stress disorder and panic disorder increased.
• Regular Force members had higher rates of depression and generalized anxiety disorder than the general Canadian population.

International Survey Of Older Adults Finds Shortcomings In Access, Coordination, And Patient-Centered Care

November 20, 2014 Comments off

International Survey Of Older Adults Finds Shortcomings In Access, Coordination, And Patient-Centered Care
Source: Health Affairs

Industrialized nations face the common challenge of caring for aging populations, with rising rates of chronic disease and disability. Our 2014 computer-assisted telephone survey of the health and care experiences among 15,617 adults age sixty-five or older in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States has found that US older adults were sicker than their counterparts abroad. Out-of-pocket expenses posed greater problems in the United States than elsewhere. Accessing primary care and avoiding the emergency department tended to be more difficult in the United States, Canada, and Sweden than in other surveyed countries. One-fifth or more of older adults reported receiving uncoordinated care in all countries except France. US respondents were among the most likely to have discussed health-promoting behaviors with a clinician, to have a chronic care plan tailored to their daily life, and to have engaged in end-of-life care planning. Finally, in half of the countries, one-fifth or more of chronically ill adults were caregivers themselves.

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