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Archive for the ‘alternative medicine’ Category

Colorado Department of Revenue — Marijuana Annual Update 2014

March 3, 2015 Comments off

Marijuana Annual Update 2014
Source: Colorado Department of Revenue

• 833 Retail Establishment Licenses and 1,416 Medical Business Licenses as of December 2014
• Approximately 110% increase in Retail Business Licenses and 6% increase in Medical Business Licenses
• 15,992 Occupational Licenses as of December 2014
• 68% non-renewal rate for Occupational Licenses
• 109,578 pounds of medical marijuana flower sold
• 38,660 pounds of retail flower sold
• 1,964,917 units of medical edible products sold
• 2,850,733 units of retail edible products sold
• Approximately 3,200 MED Due Diligence and Complaint Investigations performed and closed
• 98.2% pass rate for potency tests on edibles
• 99.2% pass rate for homogeneity tests on edibles

NCCIH Clinical Digest: Children’s Use of Complementary Health Approaches

February 24, 2015 Comments off

NCCIH Clinical Digest: Children’s Use of Complementary Health Approaches
Source: National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)

A new report based on data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)* found that nearly 12 percent of children aged 4 to 17 years use complementary health approaches. Although this was not a significant change from the previous survey in 2007, there were significant increases in children’s use of yoga, fish oil, and melatonin. The complementary health approach most commonly used by children was natural products (dietary supplements other than vitamins and minerals) at almost one-quarter the adult rate (4.9 percent vs. 17.6 percent). This issue of the digest highlights findings from the survey, which aims to provide the most current and comprehensive picture of U.S. children’s use of complementary health approaches, and may give you insight into your own patients’ use of these products and practices.

*The complementary health questionnaire was developed by NIH’s National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (formerly NCCAM) and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. The questionnaire is administered every 5 years as part of the NHIS, an annual study in which tens of thousands of Americans are interviewed about their health- and illness-related experiences. The 2012 survey results are based on combined data from 17,321 interviews with a knowledgeable adult about children aged 4 to 17 years.

See: Children and Complementary Health Approaches

Spinal Manipulation

February 23, 2015 Comments off

Spinal Manipulation
Source: National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)

Spinal manipulation—sometimes called “spinal manipulative therapy”—is practiced by health care professionals such as chiropractors, osteopathic physicians, naturopathic physicians, physical therapists, and some medical doctors. Practitioners perform spinal manipulation by using their hands or a device to apply a controlled force to a joint of the spine. The amount of force applied depends on the form of manipulation used. The goal of the treatment is to relieve pain and improve physical functioning.

See also: Chiropractic: An Introduction

Strengthening Collaborations With the U.S. Department of Defense and U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: Effectiveness Research on Mind and Body Interventions

February 23, 2015 Comments off

Strengthening Collaborations With the U.S. Department of Defense and U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: Effectiveness Research on Mind and Body Interventions
Source: National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)
From press release:

The feasibility of conducting larger-scale research studies on nondrug approaches for pain management in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) should be assessed by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This recommendation was delivered in a report by a working group of the Center’s Advisory Council.

“Chronic pain is a major public health problem that affects more than 100 million Americans, and research shows that it may disproportionately affect military personnel and Veterans,” said Lloyd Michener, M.D., professor and chair, Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina; chair of the working group. “The high rates of chronic pain in the military and Veteran populations are alarming. New strategies for managing this widespread condition are urgently needed.”

The working group recommended that the proposed research should:

  • Assess the impact of pain on patient function and quality of life as primary outcome measures, with changes in the use of opioids and other drugs as a secondary outcome;
  • Evaluate an integrated package of nondrug treatments, an integrative model of care, or a holistic approach to care rather than focusing on individual complementary health approaches;
  • Focus on patients in the early stages of chronic pain;
  • Leverage natural experiments and existing resources whenever possible; and
  • Be pragmatic and embedded in the delivery of care.

Use of Complementary Health Approaches in the U.S. — National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)

February 20, 2015 Comments off

Use of Complementary Health Approaches in the U.S. — National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)
Source: National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)

2012 NHIS Highlights

  • In 2012, 33.2% of U.S. adults used complementary health approaches. This is similar to the percentages in 2007 (35.5%) and 2002 (32.3%).
  • 11.6% of U.S. children age 4 to 17 used complementary health approaches in 2012. There was no meaningful change from 2007, when 12.0% used them.
  • In 2012, as in 2007 and 2002, the most commonly used complementary approach was natural products (dietary supplements other than vitamins and minerals). 17.7% of adults and 4.9% of children age 4 to 17 used natural products.

Bromelain (Pineapple Extract)

January 29, 2015 Comments off

Bromelain
Source: National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

+ Bromelain is a mixture of enzymes found in the pineapple plant. Pineapple is native to the Americas but is now grown throughout the world in tropical and subtropical regions. Historically, natives of Central and South America used pineapple for a variety of ailments, such as digestive disorders.

+ Currently, bromelain is used as a dietary supplement for nasal swelling and inflammation, osteoarthritis, cancer, poor digestion, and muscle soreness. Topical (applied to the skin) bromelain is used for wounds and burns.

+ Bromelain is obtained from the stem or fruit of the pineapple. It is sold in the form of a powder, cream, tablet, or capsule, and it may be used alone or in combination with other ingredients.

Medical Marijuana: A Primer on Ethics, Evidence, and Politics

January 22, 2015 Comments off

Medical Marijuana: A Primer on Ethics, Evidence, and Politics (PDF)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners – JN

Controversy in the United States about the decriminalization of cannabis to allow health care providers to recommend it for therapeutic use (medical marijuana) has been based on varying policies and beliefs about cannabis rather than on scientific evidence. Issues include the duty to provide care, conflicting reports of the therapeutic advantages and risks of cannabis, inconsistent laws, and even the struggle to remove barriers to the scope of practice for advanced practice registered nurses. This article reviews the ethics, evidence, and politics of this complex debate.

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