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The Cost of Inaction for Young Children Globally: Workshop Summary (2014)

September 18, 2014 Comments off

The Cost of Inaction for Young Children Globally: Workshop Summary (2014)
Source: Institute of Medicine (IOM); National Research Council

The Cost of Inaction for Young Children Globally is the summary of a workshop hosted by the Institute of Medicine Forum on Investing in Young Children Globally in April 2014 to focus on investments in young children and the cost of inaction. Participants explored existing, new, and innovative science and research from around the world to translate this evidence into sound and strategic investments in policies and practices that will make a difference in the lives of children and their caregivers. This report discusses intersections across health, education, nutrition, living conditions, and social protection and how investments of economic, natural, social, and other resources can sustain or promote early childhood development and well-being.

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Household Food Security in the United States in 2013

September 4, 2014 Comments off

Household Food Security in the United States in 2013
Source: USDA Economic Research Service

An estimated 14.3 percent of American households were food insecure at least some time during the year in 2013, meaning they lacked access to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members. The change from 14.5 percent in 2012 was not statistically significant.The prevalence of very low food security was essentially unchanged at 5.6 percent.

See also: Household Food Security in the United States in 2013: Statistical Supplement

The Role of the Informal Economy in Addressing Urban Food Insecurity in Sub-Saharan Africa

August 20, 2014 Comments off

The Role of the Informal Economy in Addressing Urban Food Insecurity in Sub-Saharan Africa
Source: Centre for International Governance Innovation

Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is facing high rates of urbanization and increasing food insecurity. The informal food economy addresses food insecurity by providing access to affordable food and significant employment opportunities to the urban poor in the SSA. The authors of the latest installment of the Junior Fellows Policy Brief Series state that different policy approaches need to be taken into account to address the diverse needs of the informal food economy, including the needs of “survivalist” traders, larger constrained enterprises and female vendors. They recommend that there should be a targeted social protection scheme for survivalists in the informal economy; informal-sector policies should consider the structural barriers women face in the informal sector; budgets for municipal governments should be increased; and government officials should consider policies to create an enabling environment for informal-sector enterprises facing constraints to growth.

Elections Matter 2014

August 12, 2014 Comments off

Elections Matter 2014
Source: Bread for the World Institute
From website:

The elections in 2014 (congressional) and 2016 (congressional and presidential) are vitally important to Bread for the World.

Bread wants to help end hunger by 2030, and to do that, it needs to help build the political will to make hunger a national priority by 2017.

Starting with this year’s elections, Bread hopes it can get a Congress and new president who are behind these goals.

This summer and fall, during the campaigns leading up to the 2014 mid-term congressional elections, Bread is asking its members all over the country to engage all candidates on hunger and poverty issues.

International Food Security Assessment, 2014-24

July 2, 2014 Comments off

International Food Security Assessment, 2014-24
Source: USDA Economic Research Service

The number of food-insecure people is projected to fall 9 percent to 490 million in 2014 from 539 million in 2013 in the 76 low- and middle-income countries included in the ERS report. Over the longer term, the food security situation is projected to deteriorate with the share of the population that is food insecure projected to reach 14.6 percent in 2024 up from 13.9 percent in 2014.

Prevalence of U.S. Food Insecurity Is Related to Changes in Unemployment, Inflation, and the Price of Food

June 25, 2014 Comments off

Prevalence of U.S. Food Insecurity Is Related to Changes in Unemployment, Inflation, and the Price of Food
Source: USDA Economic Research Service

Food security has remained essentially unchanged since the 2007-09 recession. Falling unemployment from early post-recession (2009-10) to 2012, absent any other changes, would suggest a modest decline in the prevalence of food insecurity. However, this report finds that potential improvement was almost exactly offset by the effects of higher inflation and the higher relative price of food in 2012.

U.S. food aid reform 101: fact sheet

June 18, 2014 Comments off

U.S. food aid reform 101: fact sheet (PDF)
Source: Bread for the World Institute

Despite increasing demand for food assistance, particularly among vulnerable women and children, funding for FFP is declining. More people are in need of assistance than ever, especially as the lasting effects of drought are felt in places like Africa and refugees are fleeing fragile states. Making every food-aid dollar count is both a responsible use of taxpayer money and a moral imperative.

Food-aid reform efforts reflect a more responsive approach to global food assistance in a time of declining budgets. New, more efficient food-aid programs continue to buy American-grown commodities while adding the option to be flexible in using local and regional food purchases and cash vouchers for food where appropriate. In the recently passed bipartisan farm bill and the current fiscal year funding bill, efforts to make food aid more efficient were recognized by Congress. Unfortunately, the progress we’ve made to reform food aid is at risk.

The House of Representatives recently passed a bill that would keep 2 million people from receiving lifesaving food aid. This bill takes critical food-aid dollars away from hungry people to pay for the increased cost of transporting food. This subsidy to the world’s largest shipping companies was quietly inserted as a provision in the Coast Guard Reauthorization Bill for fiscal year 2015. This provision has nothing to do with the U.S. Coast Guard and is a blatant attempt by special interests to line their own pockets while more people overseas go hungry.

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