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Archive for the ‘tobacco and smoking’ Category

Pre- and Postnatal Exposure to Parental Smoking and Allergic Disease Through Adolescence

September 8, 2014 Comments off

Pre- and Postnatal Exposure to Parental Smoking and Allergic Disease Through Adolescence
Source: Pediatrics

OBJECTIVES: To examine the role of prenatal and postnatal second-hand tobacco smoke (SHS) exposure on asthma, rhinitis, and eczema development up to 16 years of age.

METHODS: A birth cohort of 4089 children was followed for 16 years. Information on parental smoking habits, lifestyle factors, and symptoms of allergic disease was gathered using repeated parental questionnaires. Generalized estimating equations assessed the overall and age-specific associations between SHS exposure and allergic disease at ages 1 to 16 years.

RESULTS: Exposure to SHS in utero was associated with an overall elevated risk of developing asthma up to 16 years (odds ratio [OR] = 1.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15–1.83) but not for rhinitis or eczema. After additional adjustment for parental smoking throughout childhood, excess overall risks for asthma remained statistically significant. Moreover, a dose-dependent pattern with SHS was observed. Exposure to SHS during infancy was associated with an overall elevated risk of asthma (OR = 1.23; 95% CI, 1.01–1.51), rhinitis (OR = 1.18; 95% CI, 1.01–1.39), and eczema (OR = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.09–1.45) up to 16 years. When age-specific associations were examined, the elevated risks related to SHS exposure in utero or during infancy were mostly confined to early childhood for asthma and rhinitis, whereas the excess risk of eczema appeared greatest at later ages.

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that early SHS exposure, in utero or during infancy, influences the development of allergic disease up to adolescence. Excess risks for asthma and rhinitis were seen primarily in early childhood, whereas those for eczema occurred at later ages.

Workplace Stress in the United States: Issues and Policies

August 11, 2014 Comments off

Workplace Stress in the United States: Issues and Policies
Source: OECD

Despite relative affluence, workplace stress is a prominent feature of the US labour market. To the extent that job stress causes poor health outcomes – either directly through increased blood pressure, fatigue, muscle pain, etc. or indirectly through increased rates of cigarette smoking – policy to lessen job stress may be appropriate. Focusing predominantly on the United States, this report reviews the literature on a variety of economic concerns related to job stress and health. Areas in which economists may provide valuable insights regarding job stress include empirical selection concerns in identifying the effect of stress on health; measurement error with respect to stress; the existence and magnitude of compensating differentials for stress; and the unique “job lock” effect in the United States created by a system of employer-provided health insurance. This report concludes with a brief discussion of US policies related to job stress.

E-Cigarettes and Federal Regulation (Updated)

August 7, 2014 Comments off

E-Cigarettes and Federal Regulation (Updated)
Source: Health Affairs

Policy makers have begun developing rules for how popular alternatives to traditional cigarettes can be marketed and sold.

What’s the issue?
E-cigarettes, virtually nonexistent 10 years ago, have skyrocketed in popularity. Though often shaped like a traditional cigarette, they are fundamentally different in both design and ingredients and are widely believed by supporters and critics to be a safer alternative and a potentially valuable tool in weaning people off tobacco cigarettes. How much safer, however, and how well they function as a smoking cessation device are key questions subject to a fierce debate.

Little Filtered Cigar, Cigarillo, and Premium Cigar Smoking Among Adults — United States, 2012–2013

August 5, 2014 Comments off

Little Filtered Cigar, Cigarillo, and Premium Cigar Smoking Among Adults — United States, 2012–2013
Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (CDC)

The burden of death and disease from tobacco use in the United States has been caused overwhelmingly by cigarettes and other smoked tobacco products (1). In the United States, cigarette consumption declined during 2000–2011; however, consumption of cigars more than doubled during the same period (2). The cigar market includes diverse product types manufactured with a variety of shapes and sizes, filters, tips, flavors, and prices (3). Although national estimates of cigar consumption have been reported previously (2,3), data characterizing who smokes different cigar types are limited. A recent analysis from the 2012–2013 National Adult Tobacco Survey (NATS) found that more than one in 20 U.S. adults smoke cigars “every day,” “someday,” or “rarely” (4). This report expands upon those findings, using data from the 2012–2013 NATS to further characterize cigar smokers by the usual type of cigar smoked using the following categories: little filtered cigars (LFCs), cigarillos/other mass market cigars (cigarillos/MMCs), and premium cigars. The findings indicate that among U.S. adults who smoke cigars, 61.8% usually smoke cigarillos/MMCs, 19.9% usually smoke premium cigars, and the remainder, 18.4%, usually smoke LFCs. These data can help to inform public health interventions to reduce the burden of adverse health effects caused by cigar smoking in the United States, including regulation.

Electronic cigarettes: review of use, content, safety, effects on smokers and potential for harm and benefit

August 5, 2014 Comments off

Electronic cigarettes: review of use, content, safety, effects on smokers and potential for harm and benefit
Source: Addiction

Aims
We reviewed available research on the use, content and safety of electronic cigarettes (EC), and on their effects on users, to assess their potential for harm or benefit and to extract evidence that can guide future policy.

Methods
Studies were identified by systematic database searches and screening references to February 2014.

Results
EC aerosol can contain some of the toxicants present in tobacco smoke, but at levels which are much lower. Long-term health effects of EC use are unknown but compared with cigarettes, EC are likely to be much less, if at all, harmful to users or bystanders. EC are increasingly popular among smokers, but to date there is no evidence of regular use by never-smokers or by non-smoking children. EC enable some users to reduce or quit smoking.

Conclusions
Allowing EC to compete with cigarettes in the market-place might decrease smoking-related morbidity and mortality. Regulating EC as strictly as cigarettes, or even more strictly as some regulators propose, is not warranted on current evidence. Health professionals may consider advising smokers unable or unwilling to quit through other routes to switch to EC as a safer alternative to smoking and a possible pathway to complete cessation of nicotine use.

New From the GAO

July 29, 2014 Comments off

New GAO Reports and Testimonies
Source: Government Accountability Office

Reports

1. USDA Farm Programs: Farmers Have Been Eligible for Multiple Programs and Further Efforts Could Help Prevent Duplicative Payments. GAO-14-428, July 8.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-428
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/664671.pdf

2. 401(K) Plans: Improvements Can Be Made to Better Protect Participants in Managed Accounts. GAO-14-310, June 25.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-310
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/664392.pdf

3. National Flood Insurance Program: Additional Guidance on Building Requirements to Mitigate Agricultural Structures’ Damage in High-Risk Areas Is Needed. GAO-14-583, June 30.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-583
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/664517.pdf

4. Medicaid Financing: States’ Increased Reliance on Funds from Health Care Providers and Local Governments Warrants Improved CMS Data Collection. GAO-14-627, July 29.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-627
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/665076.pdf

Testimonies

1. Screening Partnership Program: TSA Has Improved Application Guidance and Monitoring of Screener Performance, and Continues to Improve Cost Comparison Methods, by Jennifer Grover, acting director, homeland security and justice, before the Subcommittee on Transportation Security, House Committee on Homeland Security. GAO-14-787T, July 29.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-787T
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/665067.pdf

2. Budget Issues: Opportunities to Reduce Federal Fiscal Exposures Through Greater Resilience to Climate Change and Extreme Weather, by Alfredo Gomez, director, natural resources and environment, before the Senate Committee on the Budget. GAO-14-504T, July 29.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-504T
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/665090.pdf

3. Federal Real Property: Better Guidance and More Reliable Data Needed to Improve Management, by David J. Wise, director, physical infrastructure issues, before the Subcommittee on Government Operations, House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. GAO-14-757T, July 29.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-757T
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/665086.pdf

4. Tobacco Taxes: Disparities in Rates for Similar Smoking Products Continue to Drive Market Shifts to Lower-Taxed Options, by David Gootnick, director, international affairs and trade, before the Senate Committee on Finance. GAO-14-811T, July 29.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-811T
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/665082.pdf

5. Medicaid: Completed and Preliminary Work Indicate that Transparency around State Financing Methods and Payments to Providers Is Still Needed for Oversight, by Katherine M. Iritani, director, health care, before the Subcommittee on Energy Policy, Health Care and Entitlements, House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. GAO-14-817T, July 29.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-817T
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/665070.pdf

6. Combating Nuclear Smuggling: Past Work and Preliminary Observations on Research and Development at the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, by David C. Trimble, director, natural resources and environment, before the Subcommittee on Cybsersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies, House Committee on Homeland Security. GAO-14-783T, July 29.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-783T
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/665073.pdf

Tobacco Product Use Among Adults — United States, 2012–2013

June 30, 2014 Comments off

Tobacco Product Use Among Adults — United States, 2012–2013
Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (CDC)

Despite significant declines in cigarette smoking among U.S. adults over the past five decades, progress has slowed in recent years, and the prevalence of use of other tobacco products such as cigars and smokeless tobacco has not changed (1,2). Additionally, the prevalence of use of emerging products, including electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), has rapidly increased (3). This report provides the most recent national estimates of tobacco use among adults aged ≥18 years, using data from the 2012–2013 National Adult Tobacco Survey (NATS). The findings indicate that 21.3% of U.S. adults used a tobacco product every day or some days, and 25.2% used a tobacco product every day, some days, or rarely. Population-level interventions focused on the diversity of tobacco product use, including tobacco price increases, high-impact antitobacco mass media campaigns, comprehensive smoke-free laws, and enhanced access to help quitting, in conjunction with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation of tobacco products, are critical to reducing tobacco-related diseases and deaths in the United States (4).

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