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How frequently do private businesses pay workers?

July 9, 2014 Comments off

How frequently do private businesses pay workers?
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Payday is a highly anticipated day for any worker no matter when it takes place. How frequently workers get paid and how many paydays there are per year could affect their decisions as consumers, such as if and when they decide to purchase particular goods and services. If so, then the length of the workers’ pay period may have an impact on the velocity of money—that is, the number of times $1 is spent to purchase goods and services. Also, how frequently a worker is paid could play into his or her borrowing and saving choices.

From the employer perspective, the length of a business’ pay period is associated with the business’ costs and cash flows. Processing payroll, mailing checks, and paying the banking fees charged for a direct deposit are all costs that may incline businesses to pay their workers less frequently. However, most states set a minimum limit on how frequently employees are paid.

This Beyond the Numbers article analyzes pay frequencies, or lengths of pay periods, that private businesses use in the United States, as collected by the Current Employment Statistics (CES) survey. Data of this nature are not published in any standard Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS, the Bureau) source, but are available upon request. The article also explains why the CES program collects such data.

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The Employment Situation — June 2014

July 3, 2014 Comments off

The Employment Situation — June 2014
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 288,000 in June, and the unemployment rate declined to 6.1 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Job gains were widespread, led by employment growth in professional and business services, retail trade, food services and drinking places, and health care.

American Time Use Survey — 2013 Results

June 24, 2014 Comments off

American Time Use Survey — 2013 Results
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

On an average day in 2013, employed adults living in households with no children under age 18 engaged in leisure activities for 4.5 hours, about an hour more than employed adults living with a child under age 6, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Nearly everyone age 15 and over (95 percent) engaged in some sort of leisure activity, such as watching TV, socializing, or exercising.

Labor Force Characteristics of Foreign-born Workers — 2013

June 11, 2014 Comments off

Labor Force Characteristics of Foreign-born Workers — 2013
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

The unemployment rate for the foreign born in the United States was 6.9 percent in 2013, down from 8.1 percent in 2012, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. The jobless rate for the native born fell to 7.5 percent in 2013, also down from 8.1 percent in the prior year.

The Employment Situation — May 2014

June 6, 2014 Comments off

The Employment Situation — May 2014
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 217,000 in May, and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 6.3 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Employment increased in professional and business services, health care and social assistance, food services and drinking places, and transportation and warehousing.

Women in the Labor Force: A Databook

May 28, 2014 Comments off

Women in the Labor Force: A Databook (PDF)
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

This report presents historical and current labor force and earnings data for women from the Current Population Survey.

Americans’ aging autos

May 13, 2014 Comments off

Americans’ aging autos
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

From 2008 to 2012, the average age of U.S. households’ vehicles increased as owners held on to their cars, trucks, and vans longer. The trend in aging autos coincides with declines in average household income in 2008; however, subsequent recovery in households’ incomes and a return to previous levels of expenditures on vehicles in 2012 do not appear to have reversed the pattern of aging. (See chart 1.) Analysis of data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Expenditure Survey suggests that households continued to own the same number of vehicles over the last 10 years, but are owning their vehicles longer.

An overview of employment and wages in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) groups

May 12, 2014 Comments off

An overview of employment and wages in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) groups
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Total May 2013 OES employment in all STEM occupations is 16,994,480. This is nearly 13 percent of total national employment (132,588,810). Across the four types of STEM subdomains, health occupations have the most employment (8,276,100) and architecture occupations have the least employment (156,650). Of the five types of STEM occupations, the largest by far is group A (Research, development, design, or practitioner occupations), with employment of 9,874,110. Next largest is group B (Technologist and technician occupations), with employment of 5,212,070. The remaining three types of STEM occupations each have employment totals less than 1 million. Now, let’s take a look at employment estimates for each of the 20 groups.

Fact Sheet — Fatal and Nonfatal Occupational Injuries and Illnesses in the Oil and Gas Industry

May 5, 2014 Comments off

Fatal and Nonfatal Occupational Injuries and Illnesses in the Oil and Gas Industry
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

The private mining industry accounted for 155 fatal occupational injuries in 2011. The oil and gas extraction industries accounted for over 70 percent of those fatalities.

From 2003 to 2011, the latest year for which final numbers are available, the number of fatal occupational injuries in the private oil and gas industries ranged from as high as 125 in 2006 to as low as 68 in 2009. There were 112 fatal injuries in the oil and gas industry in 2011. Over the 5-year period from 2007 to 2011, there were 529 fatal injuries in the oil and gas industries. Texas recorded the highest number of fatalities, followed by Oklahoma and Louisiana. The table below provides a list of the 10 states with the highest number of oil and gas fatalities from 2007 to 2011. State industry counts should not be compared because of the large differences in employment and industry composition from state to state. Trends in the oil and gas extraction industries have been changing, with New Mexico and North Dakota seeing a larger increase than in years past.

Payroll employment rises 288,000 in April; unemployment rate falls to 6.3%

May 2, 2014 Comments off

Payroll employment rises 288,000 in April; unemployment rate falls to 6.3%
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 288,000, and the unemployment rate fell by 0.4 percentage point to 6.3 percent in April, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Employment gains were widespread, led by job growth in professional and business services, retail trade, food services and drinking places, and construction.

Employment Characteristics of Families — 2013

April 30, 2014 Comments off

Employment Characteristics of Families — 2013
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

In 2013, 9.6 percent of families included an unemployed person, down from 10.5 percent in 2012, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Of the nation’s 80.4 million families, 80.0 percent had at least one employed member in 2013.

Monthly Labor Review — The first hundred years of the Consumer Price Index: a methodological and political history

April 25, 2014 Comments off

Monthly Labor Review — The first hundred years of the Consumer Price Index: a methodological and political history
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

From businesses to government agencies to senior citizens, groups with often competing aims and desires use the Consumer Price Index. In attempting to satisfy their disparate needs, the Bureau of Labor Statistics frequently is challenged to produce a statistic that is both timely and accurate. This technical and political history explains both how and why the Bureau has come to produce a family of Consumer Price Indexes to address the challenge.

Beyond the Numbers: Employer-sponsored benefits extended to domestic partners

April 24, 2014 Comments off

Beyond the Numbers: Employer-sponsored benefits extended to domestic partners
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

As part of compensation packages offered to employees, it is common for employers to extend certain benefits to an employee’s family members. For example, employment-based health benefits typically include insurance coverage for the family, and traditional (defined-benefit) pension plans provide survivor benefits to spouses of married employees. As employers recognize different family structures, many have adapted by offering similar benefits to employees who have varied family units. For example, employers often vary employee contributions for health benefits based on family makeup by identifying different contribution amounts for married employees with children and for single employees with children. New data provide a picture of how frequently certain benefits are extended to unmarried opposite-sex and unmarried same-sex partners. For example, 72 percent of civilian workers had access to employment-based health benefits in March 2013, with nearly all the employers extending these benefits to spouses and children, but only 32 percent of civilian workers had health benefits extended to unmarried same-sex domestic partners and 26 percent had benefits extended to unmarried opposite-sex domestic partners.

College Enrollment and Work Activity of 2013 High School Graduates

April 23, 2014 Comments off

College Enrollment and Work Activity of 2013 High School Graduates
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

In October 2013, 65.9 percent of 2013 high school graduates were enrolled in colleges or universities, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Recent high school graduates not enrolled in college in October 2013 were over twice as likely as enrolled graduates to be working or looking for work–74.2 percent compared with 34.1 percent.

Occupational Outlook Quarterly — Spring 2014

April 14, 2014 Comments off

Occupational Outlook Quarterly — Spring 2014
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics
Articles include:

  • STEM 101: Intro to tomorrow’s jobs
  • Careers with options: Occupations with jobs in many industries
  • Healthcare: Millions of jobs now and in the future
  • My career: Veterinary technician
  • Brief items of interest to counselors and students
  • You’re a what? Roastmaster
  • More education, less unemployment

Occupational Employment and Wages — May 2013 (released 4/1/14)

April 9, 2014 Comments off

Occupational Employment and Wages — May 2013
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Retail salespersons and cashiers were the occupations with the largest employment in May 2013, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. These two occupations combined made up nearly 6 percent of total U.S. employment, with employment levels of 4.5 million and 3.3 million, respectively. National employment and wage information for all occupations is shown in table 1.

The data in this release are from the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) program, which provides employment and wage estimates by area and by industry for wage and salary workers in 22 major occupational groups, 94 minor occupational groups, 458 broad occupations, and 821 detailed occupations.

The Employment Situation — March 2014

April 4, 2014 Comments off

The Employment Situation — March 2014
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 192,000 in March, and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 6.7 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Employment grew in professional and business services, in health care, and in mining and logging.

Nonfatal injuries and illnesses among state and local government workers

April 3, 2014 Comments off

Nonfatal injuries and illnesses among state and local government workers
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

The scope of the Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses was expanded with the 2008 survey to cover a more complete section of the U.S. economy: state and local government workers. Prior to the publication of the 2008 survey results, data users commonly requested information about industries in the public sector. Estimates covering nearly 18.5 million state and local government workers show that these public sector employees experienced a higher incidence rate of work-related injuries and illnesses than their private industry counterparts.This Spotlight on Statistics compares characteristics of injury and illness cases in state and local government with those in private industry, highlighting incidence rate trends in selected state and local government industries and examining injury and illness rates and cases that occurred in state and local government workplaces in 2011.

Employer-sponsored benefits extended to domestic partners

April 2, 2014 Comments off

Employer-sponsored benefits extended to domestic partners
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

As part of compensation packages offered to employees, it is common for employers to extend certain benefits to an employee’s family members. For example, employment-based health benefits typically include insurance coverage for the family, and traditional (defined-benefit) pension plans provide survivor benefits to spouses of married employees. As employers recognize different family structures, many have adapted by offering similar benefits to employees who have varied family units. For example, employers often vary employee contributions for health benefits based on family makeup by identifying different contribution amounts for married employees with children and for single employees with children. New data provide a picture of how frequently certain benefits are extended to unmarried opposite-sex and unmarried same-sex partners. For example, 72 percent of civilian workers had access to employment-based health benefits in March 2013, with nearly all the employers extending these benefits to spouses and children, but only 32 percent of civilian workers had health benefits extended to unmarried same-sex domestic partners and 26 percent had benefits extended to unmarried opposite-sex domestic partners.

America’s Young Adults at 27: Labor Market Activity, Education, and Household Composition: Results From a Longitudinal Survey Summary

April 1, 2014 Comments off

America’s Young Adults at 27: Labor Market Activity, Education, and Household Composition: Results From a Longitudinal Survey Summary
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

\Young adults born in the early 1980s held an average of 6.2 jobs from age 18 through age 26, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Over two-thirds of these jobs were held from ages 18 to 22. Women with more education held more jobs than women with less education. Regardless of education, men held a similar number of jobs.

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