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The Third Shift: Child Care Needs and Access for Working Mothers in Restaurants

September 4, 2013 Comments off

The Third Shift: Child Care Needs and Access for Working Mothers in Restaurants (PDF)
Source: Institute for Women’s Policy Research

The restaurant industry is one of the largest sectors in the United States economy and is projected to be among those with the largest growth by 2020. It currently employs over 10 million workers. Between 2000 and 2010, our economy as a whole shed jobs at a rate of -0.2 percent.3 However, food services and drinking places are projected to create over 860,000 new jobs between 2010 and 2020.4 Similarly, our economic output in the last ten years ambled along at a rate of 1 percent of growth, while restaurants grew one and a half times faster, adding $134. billion to our economy. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects the industry’s growth to continue apace over the next ten years.

Despite the industry’s growth and potential for lifting the livelihoods of its workers, especially for women and mothers, working conditions have deteriorated and wages have not kept pace with growth. In fact, restaurant occupations employ the highest proportion of workers earning at or below the federal minimum wage. Food preparation and service-related occupations comprised over one-quarter of all U.S. workers who earned the federal minimum wage and almost 60 percent of all U.S. workers paid below the federal minimum wage. Restaurant workers are also often denied common employee benefits, such as medical benefits and sick leave. For example, in 2012, 77 percent of service sector workers, including restaurant workers, did not have paid sick leave.

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Prepping Colleges for Parents: Strategies for Supporting Student Parent Success in Postsecondary Education

September 4, 2013 Comments off

Prepping Colleges for Parents: Strategies for Supporting Student Parent Success in Postsecondary Education (PDF)
Source: Institute for Women’s Policy Research

This brief is a product of the Student Parent Success Initiative (SPSI) at the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR). It provides a framework for thinking about the range of supports student parents typically need and example programs. It draws from information and lessons learned collected by IWPR from initiatives supporting student parents at two- and four-year colleges and universities across the country. SPSI resources may be used to inform the decisions of leaders on campuses, in communities, and among policymakers to promote better success rates and stronger families for student parents in postsecondary education.

The Importance of Social Security in the Incomes of Older Americans: Differences by Gender, Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Marital Status

August 19, 2013 Comments off

The Importance of Social Security in the Incomes of Older Americans: Differences by Gender, Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Marital Status
Source: Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Social Security is the largest source of income for most older Americans and is even more vital to particular demographic subgroups of older Americans. Analyzing the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) for calendar year 2011, this briefing paper examines the role of Social Security and other income sources in the retirement security of older Americans. It explores the unique value of Social Security to different gender, age, race/ethnic, and marital groups. It finds that significant shares of the older population rely on Social Security for the majority of their income and that Social Security lifts 14.8 million people out of poverty.

Low Literacy Means Lower Earnings, Especially for Women

February 10, 2012 Comments off

Low Literacy Means Lower Earnings, Especially for Women
Source: Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Appropriate literacy levels are crucial for both men and women seeking education and employment opportunities, but low literacy skills disproportionally hurt women’s chances of earning a sustaining wage.

+ Full Document (PDF)

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