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New Report Projects When Women in Each U.S. State Will Achieve Equal Pay; Five States Won’t See Equal Pay until the Next Century

April 8, 2015 Comments off

New Report Projects When Women in Each U.S. State Will Achieve Equal Pay; Five States Won’t See Equal Pay until the Next Century
Source: Institute for Women’s Policy Research

The first release from Status of Women in the States: 2015, a project of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR), finds that, if current trends in narrowing the pay gap in the states continue, the date when women in the United States will achieve equal pay is 2058, but new projections for each state find this date is much further out in the future for women in many parts of the country. In some states, a woman born today likely will not see wage equality in her lifetime. The report finds that at the current rate, five states—West Virginia, Utah, Louisiana, North Dakota, and Wyoming—will not see equal pay until the next century. The study is the first ever to project when the wage gap will close for every state in the nation.

The report analyzes data on women’s employment and earnings, and provides state rankings and letter grades based on a composite index first developed by IWPR in 1996. Overall, the best place for women’s employment and earnings is the District of Columbia, with an overall grade of A, while the worst is West Virginia, with a grade of F. The grades take into account women’s status on the level of earnings, the gender wage gap, labor force participation, and women’s representation in professional and managerial occupations.

Status of Women in the States

March 19, 2015 Comments off

Status of Women in the States
Source: Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR)

IWPR’s Status of Women reports are a unique source of comprehensive information on women. Since 1996, IWPR has analyzed data on a wide range of indicators at the local, state, national, and international levels, including demographics, economic security, education, reproductive rights, political participation, civic engagement, and access to health care and work supports. IWPR has released reports on each U.S. state and the District of Columbia, several city/area reports, and a series of reports and a toolkit on women in the Middle East and North Africa. Each report offers policy recommendations shaped by the research findings for that state or city/area. Recent state-level reports include The Status of Women & Girls in Colorado, The Status of Women in North Carolina, The Status of Women & Girls in West Virginia, The Status of Women in Connecticut’s Workforce, and “The Well-Being of Women in Utah.” State and federal policymakers, journalists, advocates, and community leaders have used the reports for nearly two decades to make the case for improved public policies for women and families.

4.8 Million College Students are Raising Children

March 4, 2015 Comments off

4.8 Million College Students are Raising Children
Source: Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Over a quarter (26 percent) of all undergraduate students, or 4.8 million students, are raising dependent children. Women are disproportionately likely to be balancing college and parenthood, many without the support of a spouse or partner. Women make up 71 percent of all student parents, and roughly 2 million students, or 43 percent of the total student parent population, are single mothers. Single student fathers make up 11 percent of the student parent population.

The Third Shift: Child Care Needs and Access for Working Mothers in Restaurants

September 4, 2013 Comments off

The Third Shift: Child Care Needs and Access for Working Mothers in Restaurants (PDF)
Source: Institute for Women’s Policy Research

The restaurant industry is one of the largest sectors in the United States economy and is projected to be among those with the largest growth by 2020. It currently employs over 10 million workers. Between 2000 and 2010, our economy as a whole shed jobs at a rate of -0.2 percent.3 However, food services and drinking places are projected to create over 860,000 new jobs between 2010 and 2020.4 Similarly, our economic output in the last ten years ambled along at a rate of 1 percent of growth, while restaurants grew one and a half times faster, adding $134. billion to our economy. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects the industry’s growth to continue apace over the next ten years.

Despite the industry’s growth and potential for lifting the livelihoods of its workers, especially for women and mothers, working conditions have deteriorated and wages have not kept pace with growth. In fact, restaurant occupations employ the highest proportion of workers earning at or below the federal minimum wage. Food preparation and service-related occupations comprised over one-quarter of all U.S. workers who earned the federal minimum wage and almost 60 percent of all U.S. workers paid below the federal minimum wage. Restaurant workers are also often denied common employee benefits, such as medical benefits and sick leave. For example, in 2012, 77 percent of service sector workers, including restaurant workers, did not have paid sick leave.

Prepping Colleges for Parents: Strategies for Supporting Student Parent Success in Postsecondary Education

September 4, 2013 Comments off

Prepping Colleges for Parents: Strategies for Supporting Student Parent Success in Postsecondary Education (PDF)
Source: Institute for Women’s Policy Research

This brief is a product of the Student Parent Success Initiative (SPSI) at the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR). It provides a framework for thinking about the range of supports student parents typically need and example programs. It draws from information and lessons learned collected by IWPR from initiatives supporting student parents at two- and four-year colleges and universities across the country. SPSI resources may be used to inform the decisions of leaders on campuses, in communities, and among policymakers to promote better success rates and stronger families for student parents in postsecondary education.

The Importance of Social Security in the Incomes of Older Americans: Differences by Gender, Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Marital Status

August 19, 2013 Comments off

The Importance of Social Security in the Incomes of Older Americans: Differences by Gender, Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Marital Status
Source: Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Social Security is the largest source of income for most older Americans and is even more vital to particular demographic subgroups of older Americans. Analyzing the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) for calendar year 2011, this briefing paper examines the role of Social Security and other income sources in the retirement security of older Americans. It explores the unique value of Social Security to different gender, age, race/ethnic, and marital groups. It finds that significant shares of the older population rely on Social Security for the majority of their income and that Social Security lifts 14.8 million people out of poverty.

Low Literacy Means Lower Earnings, Especially for Women

February 10, 2012 Comments off

Low Literacy Means Lower Earnings, Especially for Women
Source: Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Appropriate literacy levels are crucial for both men and women seeking education and employment opportunities, but low literacy skills disproportionally hurt women’s chances of earning a sustaining wage.

+ Full Document (PDF)

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