Archive

Archive for the ‘Gov – UK’ Category

Crime in England and Wales, Year Ending June 2014

November 18, 2014 Comments off

Crime in England and Wales, Year Ending June 2014
Source: Office for National Statistics

Key points

  • Latest figures from the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) show that, for the offences it covers, there were an estimated 7.1 million incidents of crime against households and resident adults (aged 16 and over) in England and Wales for the year ending June 2014. This represents a 16% decrease compared with the previous year’s survey, and is the lowest estimate since the survey began in 1981.
  • The CSEW covers a broad range of victim based crimes and includes crimes which do not come to the attention of the police. Decreases were evident for all major crime types compared with the previous year; violence saw a 23% fall, criminal damage fell by 20%, and theft offences decreased by 12%.
  • In contrast, police recorded crime shows no overall change from the previous year, with 3.7 million offences recorded in the year ending June 2014. Prior to this, police recorded crime figures have shown year on year reductions since 2003/04.
  • The renewed focus on the quality of crime recording is likely to have prompted improved compliance with national standards in some police forces, leading to more crimes being recorded. This is thought to have particularly affected the police recorded figures for violence against the person (up 11%) and public order offences (up 6%).
  • The number of police recorded shoplifting offences showed a 5% increase compared with the previous year. Anecdotal evidence suggests that this rise is more likely to be a result of a genuine increase in crime rather than any change in recording practice.
  • There was also an increase in the volume of fraud recorded (8% year on year), though it is difficult to judge to what extent that reflected an improvement in recording practices, an increase in public reports or a rise in actual criminality. It is thought that levels of fraud are thought to be substantially under-reported and thus these figures simply provide a measure of such offences brought to the attention of the authorities.
  • Sexual offences recorded by the police saw a 21% rise from the previous year and continues the pattern seen in recent publications. Current, rather than historic, offences account for the majority of the increase in sexual offences (73% within the last 12 months). Despite these recent increases, it is known that sexual offences are subject to a high degree of under-reporting.
About these ads

UK — Dangerous dogs: tough new law to help prevent attacks

November 17, 2014 Comments off

Dangerous dogs: tough new law to help prevent attacks
Source: Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs; Home Office

Tough new legal powers to help prevent thousands of dog attacks every year will be given to police forces and local authorities from Monday 20 October.

For the first time, police and local authorities will be able to demand that owners take action to prevent a dog attack or risk fine of up to £20,000. If a complaint has been made about a dog to the council or police, its owners could be ordered to do any or all of the following:

  • Attend dog training classes
  • Muzzle the dog or require it to be on a lead in public
  • Require the dog to be microchipped and/or neutered
  • Repair fencing to prevent the dog leaving the property

Launched today, the Dealing with irresponsible dog ownership: practitioner’s manual will guide police forces and local authorities in the use of their new legal powers to prevent dog attacks.

Measuring National Well-being – Exploring the Well-being of Children in the UK, 2014

November 13, 2014 Comments off

Measuring National Well-being – Exploring the Well-being of Children in the UK, 2014
Source: Office for National Statistics

Children’s well-being is an important part of the nation’s well-being. In 2013, there were an estimated 12 million children aged 0 to 15, nearly a fifth of the UK population. Research from The Children’s Society has shown that a significant minority of UK children suffer from low well-being, which impacts on their childhood and life chances, and their families and communities (The Children’s Society, 2014).

Children’s well-being needs to be measured in a different way to adults. The framework for measuring national well-being puts indicators into 10 domains. Three domains (Governance, Natural Environment and Economy) are contextual and do not specifically relate to children’s well-being. The remaining 7 domains are consistent at all ages. To measure children’s well-being, the 7 domains have been adopted as a framework but have been populated with measures that reflect the aspects of children’s lives that are important to them, and have the greatest effect on their well-being.

ONS has developed a provisional set of 31 headline measures of children’s well-being across the 7 domains. These include both objective and subjective measures in the domains of:

  • Personal well-being
  • Our relationships
  • Health
  • What we do
  • Where we live
  • Personal finance
  • Education and skills

In March 2014, ONS published a consultation on the first version of these measures. The consultation response was published in July 2014 and an updated set of measures will be published in 2015. This report presents estimates for 22 of the 31 measures of children’s well-being1. These estimates can be thought of as a baseline for children’s well-being. The report also considers how selected measures have changed over time or differ by gender, where this information is available.

The Changing Shape of UK Manufacturing

November 12, 2014 Comments off

The Changing Shape of UK Manufacturing
Source: Office for National Statistics

The contribution of the manufacturing industry to the UK economy has changed markedly over the last 60 years. On average, output in the industry has grown by 1.4% a year since 1948, although it has contracted around the economic downturns in the 1970s and early 1990s, and most recently and notably during the 2008-9 economic downturn. But output growth has been at a slower rate than that for the whole economy, and as a consequence the proportion of whole economy Gross Value Added (GVA) accounted for by manufacturing has fallen since the early 1950s. The change in manufacturing output over the long term is determined primarily by changes in its principle factors of production: labour and capital. An increase in either of these factors will tend to lead to an increase in output – however higher manufacturing output has been achieved despite a steady fall in the number of jobs and broadly stable capital stock. Therefore over this period labour productivity, as measured by output per labour hour worked, has increased. In other words, the manufacturing industry has become more productive. This article will analyse several potential reasons for the increase in manufacturing productivity over the long term such as: a better quality workforce; an improvement in the information technology base; a change in the composition of the UK manufacturing industry; more investment in research and development; capital deepening; and a more integrated global economy. These factors are intended to inform and encourage the debate around changes in manufacturing productivity rather than provide a comprehensive and definitive explanation.

UK — Civil Service Statistics, 2014

November 10, 2014 Comments off

Civil Service Statistics, 2014
Source: Office for National Statistics

Key points

  • Civil Service employment on 31 March 2014 was 439,942, down 8,893 (2.0%) on 31 March 2013. On a full-time equivalent basis, Civil Service employment was 405,784, down by 8,139 (2.0%) over the same period.
  • The number of full-time civil servants fell by 7,353 to 332,692 between March 2013 and March 2014. The number of civil servants working part-time fell by 1,540 to 107,250.
  • Of those employees who declared their ethnicity, 10.1% were from an ethnic minority.
  • Of those who declared their disability status, 8.8% were disabled.
  • More than half (54.9%) of all employees leaving the Civil Service were from the Administrative responsibility level.
  • More than 80% of civil servants were aged 30-59. The number of civil servants aged 60 or above was 35,781, an increase of 1,174 from 31 March 2013. The number of civil servants aged 65 and over increased by 682 from 31 March 2013.
  • Median gross annual earnings (excluding overtime or one-off bonuses) for Civil Service employees was £24,730 as of 31 March 2014, an increase of £350 (1.5%) from 31 March 2013.

Climatescope 2014

October 30, 2014 Comments off

Climatescope 2014
Source: Bloomberg New Energy Finance, Inter-American Development Bank Group, U.K. Government Department for International Development, U.S. Agency for International Development

The Climatescope is a unique country-by-country assessment, interactive report and index that evaluates the investment climate for climate-related investment worldwide.

It profiles 55 countries worldwide and evaluates their ability to attract capital for low-carbon energy sources while building a greener economy.

The Climatescope is a snapshot of where clean energy policy and finance stand today, and a guide to where clean energy can go tomorrow.

This marks the third year of the Climatescope project. In 2012 and 2013, the Climatescope focused exclusively on Latin America and the Caribbean. The first edition was developed by the Multilateral Investment Fund of the Inter-American Development Bank Group in partnership with Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

In 2014, the UK Department for International Development and the US Agency for International Development have joined as supporters and advisors. The project has been expanded to include 55 countries, states, and provinces in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Bloomberg New Energy Finance serves as research partner and author of the report.

Malaysia: the ruling coalition strikes back – Commons Library Standard Note

October 30, 2014 Comments off

Malaysia: the ruling coalition strikes back – Commons Library Standard Note
Source: House of Commons Library

In May 2013 elections, the ruling Barisan Nasional (BN) coalition, led by Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak, won a majority of seats in parliament despite gaining only 47% of the vote. The opposition coalition Pakatan Rakyat (PR), led by Anwar Ibrahim, gained 51% of the vote but extreme variations in the size of parliamentary constituencies across Malaysia meant that it was unable to translate that into electoral victory.

The outcome represented a further erosion of the BN’s once impregnable political ascendancy in Malaysia. Prime Minister Najib had sought to win back enough urban Malays and Chinese-origin voters by invoking “One Malaysia” and introducing a cautious range of political reforms. He did just enough, although the opposition challenged the probity of the result.

With his leadership under significant threat within UMNO, the dominant Malay party within the BN, since the 2013 elections Najib has launched a campaign of harassment of the political opposition and focused anew on affirmative action for Malays. Longstanding sodomy charges have been revived against Anwar Ibrahim – he is currently appealing against a five-year jail sentence but if unsuccessful his political career could well be over – and he could soon also be charged with sedition. Many wonder if the PR will hold together if he is removed from the scene.

At the same time, Najib has sought to preserve his international reputation as a reformer, focusing primarily on economic liberalisation measures. But a closer look suggests that his reforming credentials are currently somewhat threadbare.

Hat tip: GP

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 958 other followers