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What if You Earned a Diploma and Delayed Parenthood? Intergenerational Simulations of Delayed Childbearing and Increased Education

August 20, 2014 Comments off

What if You Earned a Diploma and Delayed Parenthood? Intergenerational Simulations of Delayed Childbearing and Increased Education
Source: Child Trends

This brief reports the results of using the Social Genome Model to provide a better understanding of how delaying childbearing and improving the educational attainment of teen mothers in one generation can be linked to the improved economic well-being of their children. This brief specifically reports results from “What if” simulations, in which teen mothers’ age at their first birth was increased by two or five years and in which the mothers earn a high school diploma. The implications of these changes on the life of the mothers’ children are estimated through childhood and up to age 29.

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The Youngest Americans: A Statistical Portrait of Infants and Toddlers in the United States

November 14, 2013 Comments off

The Youngest Americans: A Statistical Portrait of Infants and Toddlers in the United States (PDF)
Source: Child Trends

This report, commissioned by the Robert R. McCormick Foundation, focuses on infants and toddlers, their parents, communities, and the resources that exist to support them. This generation is more diverse than any in recent history, yet it is characterized by multiple inequities.

The Research Base for a Birth through Age Eight State Policy Framework

October 30, 2013 Comments off

The Research Base for a Birth through Age Eight State Policy Framework (PDF)
Source: Child Trends

This new report released by the Alliance for Early Success and Child Trends offers state policymakers and early childhood advocates a set of policy choices, supported by research findings, to improve the health, well-being, and education of America’s youngest and most vulnerable children.

Changing the Course for Infants and Toddlers: A Survey of State Child Welfare Policies and Initiatives

September 26, 2013 Comments off

Changing the Course for Infants and Toddlers: A Survey of State Child Welfare Policies and Initiatives (PDF)
Source: Child Trends

The harsh reality of maltreatment in the form of abuse or neglect looms in the lives of thousands of infants and toddlers: almost 200,000 children under the age of three come into contact with the child welfare system every year.

For young children, this threat arises at a crucial time in life, when early experiences are shaping the brain’s architecture into a foundation for learning, health, and future success. Maltreatment chemically alters the brain’s development and can lead to permanent damage of the brain’s architecture.

The developmental risks associated with maltreatment (such as cognitive delays, attachment disorders, difficulty showing empathy, poor self-esteem, and social challenges) are exacerbated by removal from home and placement in multiple foster homes.

Although the first years of life are a time of great vulnerability, they also present an opportunity to intervene early to prevent or minimize negative effects. Through high- quality, timely interventions focused on the unique needs of infants and toddlers, the developmental damage to very young children who have been maltreated can be significantly reduced.

It is critically important that child welfare policymakers and administrators understand the impact of maltreatment on infants and toddlers, so that they can systematically implement interventions and services that best meet the needs of these very young children.

The Survey of State Child Welfare Agency Initiatives for Maltreated Infants and Toddlers , conducted from September 2012 to March 2013, asked state child welfare agency representatives to respond to questions regarding the policies and practices that guide their work in addressing the needs of infants and toddlers who have been maltreated. Questions were included pertaining both to infants and toddlers in foster care and to infants and toddlers who have been “maltreated”: for whom a report of abuse or neglect has been substantiated by the child welfare agency or for whom an alternative/ differential response has produced a determination that the child has experienced maltreatment.

The survey’s goal was to identify and share innovations in policy and practice, and highlight key challenges, gaps, and barriers that child welfare agencies across the country face in meeting the needs of very young children who have experienced maltreatment. Forty-six states participated in the survey.

Home Front Alert: The Risks Facing Young Children in Military Families

September 6, 2013 Comments off

Home Front Alert: The Risks Facing Young Children in Military Families
Source: Child Trends

When a parent goes to war, families are deeply affected. Young children may be especially vulnerable to adverse outcomes, because of their emotional dependence on adults and their developing brains’ susceptibility to high levels of stress. Nearly half-a-million children younger than six have an active-duty parent—and some have two.

Home Front Alert: The Risks Facing Young Children in Military Families

July 22, 2013 Comments off

Home Front Alert: The Risks Facing Young Children in Military Families
Source: Child Trends
From blog post:

Today, nearly half of our active-duty military members are parents, and their absence from home is always deeply felt by their families. When a service member returns from deployment, it may seem like the hardest part is over. However, a new Child Trends study shows that after the deep emotional toll deployment takes on a family, the reunion of a deployed parent can be accompanied with a brand new set of risks and challenges – especially for young children.

What Do We Know about the High School Class of 2013?

June 16, 2013 Comments off

What Do We Know about the High School Class of 2013?
Source: Child Trends

Imagine a senior class of 100. They’re the product of their genetic predispositions, their families, their communities, and all of the opportunities (or lack of opportunities) they’ve encountered since birth. They’ve made both good choices and not-so-good ones. They’re on the threshold of adulthood. But what do we really know about them and what does their future hold?

Child Trends, a nonprofit, nonpartisan research center on children and youth issues, examined a range of available statistics to provide this portrait of the high school class of 2013…

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