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Archive for the ‘children and families’ Category

Opportunity for All: Fighting Rural Child Poverty

May 26, 2015 Comments off

Opportunity for All: Fighting Rural Child Poverty (PDF)
Source: White House

Small towns and rural communities are home to millions of Americans, are a vibrant part of our nation’s economy, and include some of the most beautiful landmarks in the country. Rural America provides the vast majority of food, energy, and environmental benefits for the rest of the country, is the source of nearly 90 percent of renewable water resources, and is home to important service sector and manufacturing hubs. Despite this critical role in our nation’s economy, too many Americans in rural areas are not sharing in our nation’s economic growth. In 2013, 6.2 million Americans in rural areas lived in poverty, including about 1.5 million children.1 Moreover, in far too many of these communities, high rates of poverty have persisted for generations: over 300 rural counties have had poverty rates of over 20 percent in every Census since 1980.

While the fight to eliminate poverty is far from over, the 2014 Economic Report of the President documented that federal programs designed to reduce poverty and promote opportunity have cut poverty by more than one-third over the past 50 years. This report also shows that poverty in rural areas fell by nearly half between 1967 and 2012, compared to about one-quarter in urban areas.

Immigration and Child Welfare

May 26, 2015 Comments off

Immigration and Child Welfare
Source: Child Welfare Information Gateway

Immigrant families involved with child welfare may face a number of particular issues, such as legal barriers to accessing services, child trauma resulting from difficult immigration or refugee experiences, a parent’s detention/deportation by immigration authorities, and acculturation and language issues. This issue brief addresses child welfare’s work with immigrant children and families; examines current issues related to immigration and child welfare; provides examples of programs and promising practices; and points to resources for professionals, families, and youth.

Family Support in Graying Societies

May 21, 2015 Comments off

Family Support in Graying Societies
Source: Pew Research Center

The United States is turning gray, with the number of people ages 65 and older expected to nearly double by 2050. This major demographic transition has implications for the economy, government programs such as Social Security and families across the U.S. Among adults with at least one parent 65 or older, nearly three-in-ten already say that in the preceding 12 months they have helped their parents financially. Twice that share report assisting a parent with personal care or day-to-day tasks. Based on demographic change alone, the burden on families seems likely to grow in the coming decades.

Germany and Italy, two of the “oldest” nations in the world, after only Japan, are already where the U.S. will be in 2050: a fifth of the population in each country is age 65 or older. Compared with the U.S. today, a higher share of adults in Germany and Italy report helping their aging parents with basic tasks, and more in Italy have also provided personal care. However, in both countries, fewer adults than in the U.S. say they have provided financial assistance to their aging parents.

Parenting Your Adopted Teenager

May 11, 2015 Comments off

Parenting Your Adopted Teenager
Source: Child Welfare Information Gateway

This factsheet is designed to help adoptive parents understand their adopted teenager’s experiences and needs so parents can respond with practical strategies that foster healthy development. These strategies include approaches that acknowledge trauma and loss, support effective communication, promote a teen’s independence, and address behavioral and mental health concerns.

OPM — Handbook on Leave and Workplace Flexibilities for Childbirth, Adoption, and Foster Care

May 11, 2015 Comments off

Handbook on Leave and Workplace Flexibilities for Childbirth, Adoption, and Foster Care (PDF)
Source: Office of Personnel Management

OPM’s Handbook contains guidance to the agencies on advanced sick and annual leave policies as required by the President’s memorandum while emphasizing the various leave entitlements and flexibilities available to assist employees.

The Handbook is divided into three distinct sections to fully assist agencies depending on the specific circumstance of the employee. The sections are: (1) Pregnancy and Childbirth, (2) Adoption and Foster Care, and (3) Interaction of the Various Leave Programs and Workplace Flexibilities. OPM believes that this new Handbook will allow agencies to be in a better position to assist employees or their family members who are experiencing childbirth, adoption, and foster care. In doing so, the Federal Government will continue to support parents to ensure they can both contribute fully in the workplace and also meet the needs of their families.

700,000 Americans Are Married to a Same-sex Spouse, Married Same-sex Couples More Likely to Raise Adopted, Foster Children and Are More Economically Secure, New Reports Show

May 8, 2015 Comments off

700,000 Americans Are Married to a Same-sex Spouse, Married Same-sex Couples More Likely to Raise Adopted, Foster Children and Are More Economically Secure, New Reports Show
Source: Williams Institute (UCLA School of Law)

According to Williams Institute Research Director Gary Gates’ assessment of a new preliminary estimate from Gallup, the number of legally married same-sex couples in the United States has more than doubled over the last year. The new figures suggest that, as of February 2015, more than 700,000 Americans are part of a married same-sex couple, implying that there are now about 350,000 married same-sex couples in the country. Estimates from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey had the figure at 130,000.

Two new research reports released today and authored by Gates show that same-sex couples, particularly married ones, are more likely to be raising adopted or foster children than their different-sex counterparts. The reports also found that same-sex couples with children have a lower median annual income than different-sex couples with kids but, like different-sex couples, married same-sex couples are more economically secure.

New Study Examines Human Services for Low-Income and At-Risk LGBT Populations

May 8, 2015 Comments off

New Study Examines Human Services for Low-Income and At-Risk LGBT Populations
Source: Williams Institute (UCLA School of Law) and Mathematica

Despite social and legal progress for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people in the United States, much about low-income and at-risk LGBT individuals and their participation in federal human service programs remains unknown. In fact, data suggest LGBT people may be disproportionately at risk of poor outcomes related to economic security and social well-being, compared to the general population.

To address this knowledge gap, Mathematica, in partnership with the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law, conducted an assessment for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation. The project aims to help identify the current knowledge base and priorities for future research and, ultimately, strengthen services for low-income and at-risk LGBT people.

A report and related issue brief look at LGBT populations’ characteristics and interactions with human services and identify data gaps. The project focused on (1) income support and self-sufficiency programs for low-income families, (2) child welfare programs, and (3) programs for youth—especially services funded by ACF (assistance for runaway and homeless youth, and sexual health education for adolescents). Three additional briefs delve into recommendations for future research in these key

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