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Great Gaps Persist in State Safety Nets, Interactive Policy Tool Shows

February 27, 2015 Comments off

Great Gaps Persist in State Safety Nets, Interactive Policy Tool Shows
Source: National Center for Children in Poverty

Today, the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) launches an updated and enhanced edition of its 50-State Policy Tracker, a unique online tool for comparing safety net policies that are critical to the economic security of working families. The tool reveals striking variation among states, showing that state of residence has a major impact on whether low-income working parents succeed in making ends meet.

The Policy Tracker makes it easy for policymakers, journalists, social researchers, and advocates to quickly and accurately compare state policies and programs vital to the well-being of low-income families. It includes key state data for 10 important social programs:

  • Child care subsidies
  • Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit
  • Earned Income Tax Credit
  • Family and medical leave
  • Income tax policy
  • Medicaid/Children’s Health Insurance Program
  • Minimum wage
  • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
  • Temporary Assistance for Needy Families
  • Unemployment insurance

NCCIH Clinical Digest: Children’s Use of Complementary Health Approaches

February 24, 2015 Comments off

NCCIH Clinical Digest: Children’s Use of Complementary Health Approaches
Source: National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)

A new report based on data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)* found that nearly 12 percent of children aged 4 to 17 years use complementary health approaches. Although this was not a significant change from the previous survey in 2007, there were significant increases in children’s use of yoga, fish oil, and melatonin. The complementary health approach most commonly used by children was natural products (dietary supplements other than vitamins and minerals) at almost one-quarter the adult rate (4.9 percent vs. 17.6 percent). This issue of the digest highlights findings from the survey, which aims to provide the most current and comprehensive picture of U.S. children’s use of complementary health approaches, and may give you insight into your own patients’ use of these products and practices.

*The complementary health questionnaire was developed by NIH’s National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (formerly NCCAM) and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. The questionnaire is administered every 5 years as part of the NHIS, an annual study in which tens of thousands of Americans are interviewed about their health- and illness-related experiences. The 2012 survey results are based on combined data from 17,321 interviews with a knowledgeable adult about children aged 4 to 17 years.

See: Children and Complementary Health Approaches

Parenting a Child Who Has Experienced Trauma

February 21, 2015 Comments off

Parenting a Child Who Has Experienced Trauma
Source: Child Welfare Information Gateway

This factsheet discusses the nature of trauma, especially abuse or neglect, the effects of trauma on children and youth, and ways to help a child who has experienced trauma. Parents or foster parents who do not understand the effects of trauma may misinterpret their child’s behavior, and attempts to address troubling behavior may be ineffective or, in some cases, even harmful. By understanding trauma, parents and foster parents can help support a child’s healing, the parent-child relationship, and their family as a whole.

Factsheets for Families: Parenting Your Adopted Preschooler

February 19, 2015 Comments off

Factsheets for Families: Parenting Your Adopted Preschooler
Source: Child Welfare Information Gateway

This factsheet is designed to help adoptive parents understand their preschooler’s developmental needs. It also provides practical strategies to promote a warm and loving parent-child relationship based on honesty and trust. It offers information on development, talking about adoption, and appropriate discipline.

See also: Factsheets for Families: Parenting Your Adopted School-Age Child

Can Public Policy Break the Glass Ceiling? Lessons from Abroad

February 17, 2015 Comments off

Can Public Policy Break the Glass Ceiling? Lessons from Abroad
Source: Center for American Progress

The problem is all too familiar: Despite women’s increased rates of employment, rising levels of educational development, and growing place as primary breadwinners, gender inequality remains pervasive. Women continue to be underrepresented in key decision-making positions in politics, business, and public life.

In the United States, the discussion of this conundrum tends to focus on personal improvement and the notion of “leaning in” popularized by Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg. However, a number of developed nations, particularly those in Europe, have sought to remedy gender inequality primarily through public policy.

This report aims to analyze and understand the benefits and limitations of such policies by exploring the direct and indirect roles that they play in supporting women’s progress in the workforce and, specifically, in helping boost their advancement into leadership positions. It looks at policies that tackle the leadership issue via quotas—which aim to have a direct impact on women’s representation—and also examines policies such as affordable child care, paid parental leave, and flexible work arrangements that help lay the groundwork for women’s leadership indirectly by enabling women to stay in the workforce after becoming mothers.

Domestic and International Adoption: Strategies to Improve Behavioral Health Outcomes for Youth and Their Families

February 17, 2015 Comments off

Domestic and International Adoption: Strategies to Improve Behavioral Health Outcomes for Youth and Their Families (PDF)
Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Summarizes data shared during a two-day interagency meeting hosted by SAMHSA in August 2012 to discuss science, policy, and practice related to the behavioral health challenges of children who have been adopted.

UK — Measuring National Well-being – Our Relationships, 2015

February 17, 2015 Comments off

Measuring National Well-being – Our Relationships, 2015
Source: Office for National Statistics

This article focuses on people’s relationships with both family and friends. However, these relationships do not operate in isolation, and relationships within the wider community and the workplace are also analysed. The ONS Measuring National Well-being programme aims to produce accepted and trusted measures of the well-being of the nation – how the UK as a whole is doing.

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