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Supervised Visitation Research & Annotated Bibliography- January 2015

April 27, 2015 Comments off

Supervised Visitation Research & Annotated Bibliography- January 2015
Source: Institute for Family Violence Studies, Florida State University

Attached you will find an updated annotated bibliography on recent research pertaining to supervised visitation. These articles and resources have been summarized for your review. Please feel free to track down original source material for a more detailed look (links are provided when available). There’s lots to learn! Hope you enjoy!

State Child Welfare Agency Directors

April 23, 2015 Comments off

State Child Welfare Agency Directors
Source: Child Welfare Information Gateway

Contact information for the Child Welfare Agency Directors in each State and Territory.

Problems Paying Medical Bills: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January 2011-June 2014

April 16, 2015 Comments off

Problems Paying Medical Bills: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January 2011-June 2014 (PDF)
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

  • The percentage of persons under age 65 who were in families having problems paying medical bills decreased from 21.3% (56.5 million) in 2011 to 17.8% (47.7 million) in the first 6 months of 2014.
  • Within each year, from 2011 through June 2014, children aged 0– 17 years were more likely than adults aged 18 – 64 to be in families having problems paying medical bills.
  • The percentage of children aged 0– 17 years who were in families having problems paying medical bills decreased from 23. 2 % in 2011 to 19.0 % in the first 6 months of 201 4.
  • In the first 6 months of 2014 , among persons under age 65, 31.2% of those who were uninsured, 24.2% of those who had public coverage, and 12.4% of those who had private coverage were in families having problems paying medical bills in the past 12 months.
  • In the first 6 months of 201 4 , 27.1% of poor, 28.0 % of near poor , and 12.6 % of not poor persons under age 65 were in families having problems paying medical bills in the past 12 months.

Progress in Identifying Infants with Hearing Loss — United States, 2006–2012

April 10, 2015 Comments off

Progress in Identifying Infants with Hearing Loss — United States, 2006–2012
Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (CDC)

Congenital hearing loss affects one to three of every 1,000 live born infants (1) and negatively impacts children through delayed speech, language, social, and emotional development when undetected (2,3). To address this public health issue, jurisdiction-based Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) programs are working to ensure all newborns are screened for hearing loss, receive follow-up diagnostic testing (DX) if they do not pass the screening, and are enrolled in early intervention (EI) services if diagnosed with a permanent hearing loss. Although substantial progress has been made in the provision and documentation of services, challenges remain because, unlike screening results, diagnostic test results and enrollment in EI are not consistently reported to the EHDI programs. Therefore, it is difficult for states and territories to know if infants received recommended follow-up services (diagnostic testing and/or EI services), often resulting in infants being classified at either stage as lost to follow-up (LFU)/lost to documentation (LTD). To assess progress toward identifying children with hearing loss and reducing LFU/LTD for DX (LFU/LTD-DX) and EI enrollment (LFU/LTD-EI*), CDC analyzed EHDI surveillance data for 2006–2012. Results indicated that the number of jurisdictions reporting data increased from 49 to 57, rates of screening increased from 95.2% to 96.6%, rates of referral from screening decreased from 2.3% to 1.6%, rates of diagnosis among infants not passing their final screening increased from 4.8% to 10.3%, and enrollment in EI among children diagnosed with hearing loss increased from 55.4% to 61.7%, whereas rates for both LFU/LTD-DX and LFU/LTD-EI declined. These findings show sustained progress toward screening, identification, and enrollment in EI as well as highlighting the need for continued improvements in the provision and documentation of EHDI services.

On the age-specific correlation between fertility and female employment: Heterogeneity over space and time in OECD countries

April 10, 2015 Comments off

On the age-specific correlation between fertility and female employment: Heterogeneity over space and time in OECD countries
Source: Demographic Research

Background:
Though there has been profound research on the curious change in correlation between total fertility rate (TFR) and female labor force participation (FLP) in the mid-1980s, aspects of the compositional character of age-specific effects and the nature of countries’ heterogeneity have been neglected.

Objective:
The present paper aims to contribute to filling this gap by analyzing annual total fertility rates and their equivalents for four age groups between 20 and 39 years as well as the respective lagged FLP from 17 OECD countries between 1985 and 2010.

Methods:
Random Intercept and Random Coefficient Models are applied, allowing us to assess both effects and country heterogeneity in slopes and intercepts.

Results:
The analyses reveal that the development of the correlation between FLP and TFR after 1985 is comprised of very different relations between age-specific fertility and labor participation. The youngest group’s situation is determined by a decrease in both fertility and FLP, while countries’ effects differ increasingly. The oldest women’s fertility decisions seem to be detached from labor market influences, though country variation is high. Women in their late 20s and early 30s, in contrast, appear to be most affected by the incompatibility of childbearing and gainful employment. Though these effects seem to have overcome their low points during the mid-1990s, only women in their early 30s show country-convergence.

Conclusions:
The results highlight the fact that total and age-specific fertility behavior, FLP-effects and country variances are distinct concepts that add considerably to the broad understanding of the correlation between fertility and FLP.

The experience of grandparents raising grandchildren

April 10, 2015 Comments off

The experience of grandparents raising grandchildren
Source: GrandFamilies

The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the experiences of grandparents and the challenges they face raising their grandchildren. This study was conducted through qualitative interviewing, where participants responded to open-ended questions regarding the challenges of raising their grandchildren. Themes and patterns were identified through an open-coding process. The five themes discussed include: characteristics of everyday life, parenting experiences, lack of resources, managing negative emotions, and social changes. Implications for clinical practice and further research are discussed.

FY 2014 Annual Report on Intercountry Adoption

April 10, 2015 Comments off

FY 2014 Annual Report on Intercountry Adoption (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of State

Tables 1 and 2 report the number of intercountry adoptions in FY 2014 involving immigration to the United States, regardless of whether the adoption occurred under the Hague Adoption Convention.

Table 3 reports the number of intercountry adoptions in FY 2014 involving emigration from the United States, regardless of whether the adoption occurred under the Hague Adoption Convention.

In FY 2014, adoption service providers (ASPs) reported 3 disrupted placements in Convention adoptions, i.e., cases in which there was an interruption of a placement for adoption during the post-placement (but pre-adoption) period. Table 6 summarizes this information.

In addition, information received from the Department of Health and Human Services pursuant to §422(b)(12) of the Social Security Act indicated 79 cases of disruptions and dissolutions involving 91 children who were adopted from foreign countries and entered state custody as a result.

Table 4 reports the average time required for completion of a Convention adoption.

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