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Archive for the ‘Europe’ Category

UK — Technical Issues in Charity Law

March 31, 2015 Comments off

Technical Issues in Charity Law
Source: Law Commission of England

This project originated from our Eleventh Programme of Law Reform. Part of the project is a review of the procedures by which charities governed by Royal Charter and by Act of Parliament amend their governing documents. The remainder of the project comprises certain issues arising out of the review of the Charities Act 2006 conducted by Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts regarding:

  • the procedures by which charities change their purposes and the administrative provisions of their governing documents;
  • the application of property cy-près, including the application cy-près of the proceeds of fundraising appeals;
  • the regulation of the acquisition, disposal and mortgage of land by charities;
  • the remuneration of a trustee of a charity for the supply of goods to the charity;
  • the power to award an equitable allowance to a trustee who has obtained an unauthorised profit;
  • the power for trustees to make ex gratia payments out of the funds of the charity;
  • the transfer of assets and liabilities on incorporation and merger, and gifts made by will to charities that have merged;
  • the availability of property held on charitable trust in the insolvency of a trustee;
  • the power of the Charity Commission to require a charity to change its name, and to refuse to register a charity unless it changes its name;
  • the power for the Charity Commission to determine the identity of the trustees of a charity; and
  • certain powers of the Charity Tribunal.

UK — Adult autism strategy statutory guidance published

March 30, 2015 Comments off

Adult autism strategy statutory guidance published
Source: Department of Health

The statutory guidance updates original guidance issued under the Autism Act 2009 and the subsequent adult autism strategy. It accounts for progress and updates to the strategy made since 2010, and recent legislation like the Care Act 2014 and the Children and Families Act 2014.

The guidance sets out requirements for local authorities and NHS organisations. It reminds them to work together and with partners, for example, in the criminal justice system or helping people with autism into employment. It provides clarity about what they have to do to meet the needs of adults with autism, including preventative support and safeguarding.

The guidance demonstrates the government’s commitment to people with autism, their families and carers, and explains what support they should expect from local authorities and NHS organisations.

Open Data in the G8

March 26, 2015 Comments off

Open Data in the G8
Source: Center for Data Innovation

In 2013, the leaders of the G8 signed an agreement committing to advance open data in their respective countries. This report assesses the current state of open data efforts in these countries and finds substantial variation in their progress. Moving forward, countries have many opportunities to enhance their open data capabilities, such as by increasing international collaboration, better educating policymakers about the benefits of open data, and working closely with civil society on open data initiatives.

EU Council Library Think Tank Review — Issue 22

March 26, 2015 Comments off

EU Council Library Think Tank Review — Issue 22
Source: General Secretariat of the Council of the EU (Central Library)

Welcome to issue 22 of the Think Tank Review compiled by the EU Council Library. It gives a short abstract of papers published in February 2015, with a link to the full text.

This month’s Review has a focus on external action and includes the CEPS/ Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung report on More Union in European defence, presented in Brussels on 9 March. Other relevant resources from the library were listed in our blog post on the event.

On economics, we harvested the habitual range of papers on the banking union, capital markets, pros and cons of the ECB’s quantitative easing, debt targets and the balanced budget rule, and more. Thomas Piketty’s book continues to trigger debate. See the collection of (mostly critical) essays on the book by the UK think tank Policy Network. On inequality, the notion at the heart of Piketty’s book, we also feature an article by Caritas Europa and one by Friends of Europe.

UK — Understanding local cyber resilience: a guide for local government on cyber threats

March 25, 2015 Comments off

Understanding local cyber resilience: a guide for local government on cyber threats
Source: Department for Communities and Local Government and Cabinet Office

This guide sets out the nature of specific cyber threats to local government and how local authorities can mitigate them.

EU — How safe are your roads? Commission road safety statistics show small improvement for 2014

March 25, 2015 Comments off

How safe are your roads? Commission road safety statistics show small improvement for 2014
Source: European Commission

Following two years of solid decreases in the number of people killed on Europe’s roads, the first reports on road deaths in 2014 are disappointing. According to the figures released today, the number of road fatalities has decreased by approximately 1% compared to 2013. This follows on the 8% decrease in 2012 and 2013. The figures reveal a total of 25 700 road deaths in 2014 across all 28 Member States of the EU. Whilst this is 5700 fewer than in 2010, it falls short of the intended target decrease.

European Security, Islamist Terrorism, and Returning Fighters, CRS Insights (March 16, 2015)

March 24, 2015 Comments off

European Security, Islamist Terrorism, and Returning Fighters, CRS Insights (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

European concerns about Islamist terrorism have been heightened considerably by recent attacks in France and Denmark. In early January 2015, gunmen killed 17 people over several days in three related incidents that targeted the Paris headquarters of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, police officers, and a kosher supermarket. The perpetrators of the attacks were French-born Muslims, with possible ties to Al Qaeda in Yemen or the Islamic State terrorist organization. In mid-February 2015, a Danish-born citizen of Palestinian descent murdered two individuals—one at a Copenhagen cafe that had been hosting a free speech debate, another at a synagogue—and wounded five police officers.

These incidents—along with the May 2014 killing of four people at the Jewish Museum in Brussels, Belgium, reportedly by a French Muslim who had spent a year with Islamist fighters in Syria—have reinforced growing unease throughout Europe about the possible threats posed by European Muslims fighting with extremist groups, especially in Syria and Iraq. Security services warn about the potential danger such trained militants might pose if and when they return to Europe, and worry about those, like the suspected Danish gunman, who may be inspired by Islamist extremist propaganda to commit “lone wolf” attacks at home without ever traveling abroad.

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