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Crime in England and Wales, Year Ending June 2014

November 18, 2014 Comments off

Crime in England and Wales, Year Ending June 2014
Source: Office for National Statistics

Key points

  • Latest figures from the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) show that, for the offences it covers, there were an estimated 7.1 million incidents of crime against households and resident adults (aged 16 and over) in England and Wales for the year ending June 2014. This represents a 16% decrease compared with the previous year’s survey, and is the lowest estimate since the survey began in 1981.
  • The CSEW covers a broad range of victim based crimes and includes crimes which do not come to the attention of the police. Decreases were evident for all major crime types compared with the previous year; violence saw a 23% fall, criminal damage fell by 20%, and theft offences decreased by 12%.
  • In contrast, police recorded crime shows no overall change from the previous year, with 3.7 million offences recorded in the year ending June 2014. Prior to this, police recorded crime figures have shown year on year reductions since 2003/04.
  • The renewed focus on the quality of crime recording is likely to have prompted improved compliance with national standards in some police forces, leading to more crimes being recorded. This is thought to have particularly affected the police recorded figures for violence against the person (up 11%) and public order offences (up 6%).
  • The number of police recorded shoplifting offences showed a 5% increase compared with the previous year. Anecdotal evidence suggests that this rise is more likely to be a result of a genuine increase in crime rather than any change in recording practice.
  • There was also an increase in the volume of fraud recorded (8% year on year), though it is difficult to judge to what extent that reflected an improvement in recording practices, an increase in public reports or a rise in actual criminality. It is thought that levels of fraud are thought to be substantially under-reported and thus these figures simply provide a measure of such offences brought to the attention of the authorities.
  • Sexual offences recorded by the police saw a 21% rise from the previous year and continues the pattern seen in recent publications. Current, rather than historic, offences account for the majority of the increase in sexual offences (73% within the last 12 months). Despite these recent increases, it is known that sexual offences are subject to a high degree of under-reporting.
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Measuring National Well-being – Exploring the Well-being of Children in the UK, 2014

November 13, 2014 Comments off

Measuring National Well-being – Exploring the Well-being of Children in the UK, 2014
Source: Office for National Statistics

Children’s well-being is an important part of the nation’s well-being. In 2013, there were an estimated 12 million children aged 0 to 15, nearly a fifth of the UK population. Research from The Children’s Society has shown that a significant minority of UK children suffer from low well-being, which impacts on their childhood and life chances, and their families and communities (The Children’s Society, 2014).

Children’s well-being needs to be measured in a different way to adults. The framework for measuring national well-being puts indicators into 10 domains. Three domains (Governance, Natural Environment and Economy) are contextual and do not specifically relate to children’s well-being. The remaining 7 domains are consistent at all ages. To measure children’s well-being, the 7 domains have been adopted as a framework but have been populated with measures that reflect the aspects of children’s lives that are important to them, and have the greatest effect on their well-being.

ONS has developed a provisional set of 31 headline measures of children’s well-being across the 7 domains. These include both objective and subjective measures in the domains of:

  • Personal well-being
  • Our relationships
  • Health
  • What we do
  • Where we live
  • Personal finance
  • Education and skills

In March 2014, ONS published a consultation on the first version of these measures. The consultation response was published in July 2014 and an updated set of measures will be published in 2015. This report presents estimates for 22 of the 31 measures of children’s well-being1. These estimates can be thought of as a baseline for children’s well-being. The report also considers how selected measures have changed over time or differ by gender, where this information is available.

The Changing Shape of UK Manufacturing

November 12, 2014 Comments off

The Changing Shape of UK Manufacturing
Source: Office for National Statistics

The contribution of the manufacturing industry to the UK economy has changed markedly over the last 60 years. On average, output in the industry has grown by 1.4% a year since 1948, although it has contracted around the economic downturns in the 1970s and early 1990s, and most recently and notably during the 2008-9 economic downturn. But output growth has been at a slower rate than that for the whole economy, and as a consequence the proportion of whole economy Gross Value Added (GVA) accounted for by manufacturing has fallen since the early 1950s. The change in manufacturing output over the long term is determined primarily by changes in its principle factors of production: labour and capital. An increase in either of these factors will tend to lead to an increase in output – however higher manufacturing output has been achieved despite a steady fall in the number of jobs and broadly stable capital stock. Therefore over this period labour productivity, as measured by output per labour hour worked, has increased. In other words, the manufacturing industry has become more productive. This article will analyse several potential reasons for the increase in manufacturing productivity over the long term such as: a better quality workforce; an improvement in the information technology base; a change in the composition of the UK manufacturing industry; more investment in research and development; capital deepening; and a more integrated global economy. These factors are intended to inform and encourage the debate around changes in manufacturing productivity rather than provide a comprehensive and definitive explanation.

UK — Civil Service Statistics, 2014

November 10, 2014 Comments off

Civil Service Statistics, 2014
Source: Office for National Statistics

Key points

  • Civil Service employment on 31 March 2014 was 439,942, down 8,893 (2.0%) on 31 March 2013. On a full-time equivalent basis, Civil Service employment was 405,784, down by 8,139 (2.0%) over the same period.
  • The number of full-time civil servants fell by 7,353 to 332,692 between March 2013 and March 2014. The number of civil servants working part-time fell by 1,540 to 107,250.
  • Of those employees who declared their ethnicity, 10.1% were from an ethnic minority.
  • Of those who declared their disability status, 8.8% were disabled.
  • More than half (54.9%) of all employees leaving the Civil Service were from the Administrative responsibility level.
  • More than 80% of civil servants were aged 30-59. The number of civil servants aged 60 or above was 35,781, an increase of 1,174 from 31 March 2013. The number of civil servants aged 65 and over increased by 682 from 31 March 2013.
  • Median gross annual earnings (excluding overtime or one-off bonuses) for Civil Service employees was £24,730 as of 31 March 2014, an increase of £350 (1.5%) from 31 March 2013.

UK — Gestation-specific Infant Mortality, 2012

October 17, 2014 Comments off

Gestation-specific Infant Mortality, 2012
Source: Office for National Statistics

Key Findings

  • Babies born in 2012 had an infant mortality rate of 3.9 deaths per 1,000 live births, compared to 4.4 deaths per 1,000 live births for babies born in 2008.
  • For babies born at term (between 37 and 41 weeks gestation), the infant mortality rate was 1.4 deaths per 1,000 live births.
  • The infant mortality rate for babies born pre-term (between 24 and 36 weeks) in 2012 was 23.6 deaths per 1,000 live births. This was almost 16% lower than the rate for pre-term babies born in 2008 (27.6 deaths per 1,000 live births).
  • The infant mortality rate for babies born to mothers aged 40 years and over was 4.8 deaths per 1,000 live births.
  • For babies born to mothers aged less than 20 years, the infant mortality rate was 5.7 deaths per 1,000 live births.
  • The infant mortality rate for babies born pre-term was higher for single births than for multiple births (24.8 and 19.9 deaths per 1,000 live births respectively).\
  • Infant mortality rates by ethnic group were highest for babies in the Bangladeshi and Black Caribbean groups (6.9 deaths per 1,000 live births).

UK — Population by Country of Birth and Nationality Report, August 2014

October 9, 2014 Comments off

Population by Country of Birth and Nationality Report, August 2014
Source: Office for National Statistics

This article outlines the latest population estimates for the UK by country of birth and nationality, covering the period from 2004 up to the latest data for the year ending December 2013. The report discusses how these figures have changed over this period and highlights any statistically significant changes over the past two years in the resident population of the UK.

UK — Construction Statistics – No. 15, 2014 Edition

October 8, 2014 Comments off

Construction Statistics – No. 15, 2014 Edition
Source: Office for National Statistics

Construction Statistics brings together a wider range of statistics currently available on the construction industry from a variety of sources. This edition updates the figures for Tables 2.4, 2.8, 2.9, 3.1, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5 that were supplied in Construction Statistics Annual 2013. From 2014, Table 1.7 is no longer produced after a public consultation which showed it had little benefit to users. All other tables that were previously contained in the annual Construction Statistics publication are no longer collated and published by the ONS. Where these data tables are no longer published, links have been supplied to enable users to obtain the relevant data. This is the sixth web based only edition and the tables produced by ONS are available in Excel, allowing independent analyses of the published information.

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