Archive

Archive for the ‘AARP’ Category

Workforce Development in the United States: Lessons Learned for Older Workers

May 22, 2015 Comments off

Workforce Development in the United States: Lessons Learned for Older Workers
Source: AARP Public Policy Institute

This report by workforce experts Stephen A. Wandner, David E. Balducchi, and Christopher J. O’Leary undertakes a selective review of public workforce development programs in the United States over the last eighty years with a special emphasis on their importance to older Americans.

Particular attention is paid to services benefitting dislocated workers—that is, experienced adults permanently separated from their prior employers. The Employment Service and the Workforce Investment Act Dislocated Worker programs serve the greatest number of older workers.

The Senior Community Service Employment Program and the very small Alternative Trade Adjustment Assistance program (now called Reemployment Trade Adjustment Assistance) are the only programs targeted specifically to older workers.

The policy options presented in the paper go beyond changes to the public workforce system embodied in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014.

Job Lock and Employer-Provided Health Insurance: Evidence from the Literature

May 20, 2015 Comments off

Job Lock and Employer-Provided Health Insurance: Evidence from the Literature
Source: AARP Public Policy Institute

This report, written by Dean Baker at the Center for Economic and Policy Research, reviews the research literature on health insurance-related “job lock”—a labor market pattern that occurs when workers are reluctant to leave a job that offers health insurance because they cannot otherwise obtain affordable insurance. Based on the research, the author concludes that the Affordable Care Act’s insurance market reforms should have substantial, positive labor market effects.

The report reviews the research on three types of job lock:

  • Workers remaining in jobs in which they are not satisfied because of the fear of not being able to get health insurance at a new job (or not being able to buy or afford it in the individual market);
  • Workers being reluctant to start a business because they do not want to lose employer-provided health insurance; and
  • Workers staying employed (or employed full time) in order to obtain employer-sponsored insurance, when they would otherwise prefer to retire or work part time.

All three types of job lock are likely to be reduced by the Affordable Care Act, resulting in important gains for workers, families, and the economy.

Europe Catches Up: Older-Worker Employment in the EU and USA

April 23, 2015 Comments off

Europe Catches Up: Older-Worker Employment in the EU and USA
Source: AARP Public Policy Institute

The European Union (EU) has experienced significant growth in the employment of workers ages 55 to 64, which has far outpaced the growth of older-worker employment in the United States. An initial look might lead to the conclusion that the EU is ahead of the United States in employing older workers. However, the historical performance of the U.S. labor market should also be considered.

Categories: AARP, age and aging, Europe, labor

Access to Unemployment Insurance Benefits for Family Caregivers: An Analysis of State Rules and Practices

April 10, 2015 Comments off

2015 AARP National Caregiving Survey of Registered Voters Age 40 and Older

March 18, 2015 Comments off

2015 AARP National Caregiving Survey of Registered Voters Age 40 and Older
Source: AARP

More than 42 million family caregivers each year provide unpaid care for aging parents, spouses, aunts, uncles, friends, or other loved ones so they can live independently at home, where they want to be (87%). These family caregivers assist with daily tasks—such as eating, dressing, bathing and transportation as well as medical/nursing tasks. The value of this unpaid care is about $450 billion dollars annually. In addition, about 3.9 million family caregivers provide care to a child under 18 because of a medical, behavioral or other condition or disability. The average family caregiver is a 49 year old female taking care of a 78 year old woman and provides 20 hours a week of assistance to their loved one.

Categories: AARP, caregiving

Savings Expected from Slowdown in Medicare Spending

February 24, 2015 Comments off

Savings Expected from Slowdown in Medicare Spending
Source: AARP Public Policy Institute

Medicare growth rates have remained low since 2009, indicating that mid-term and long-range Medicare spending will be dramatically lower than expected just 5 years ago.

Experts believe that the slowdown in Medicare spending is due to a combination of factors, including health care reforms brought about by the Affordable Care Act, slower growth in new technologies, and the recession.

Monitoring the Impact of Health Reform on Americans 50-64: Use of Insurance Marketplaces

January 9, 2015 Comments off

Monitoring the Impact of Health Reform on Americans 50-64: Use of Insurance Marketplaces
Source: AARP Public Policy Institute

AARP’s Public Policy Institute collaborated with the Urban Institute’s Health Reform Monitoring Survey to learn about the experience of Americans ages 50-64 in the initial phase of implementation of health coverage reforms. This series of papers presents findings from surveys during the first open enrollment period.

The survey showed that awareness of new health insurance Marketplaces was strong overall. Most of those who already had insurance expected they would continue to get coverage from the same source in 2014. The uninsured had mixed expectations about getting coverage. Interest in using the Marketplaces was highest among the uninsured and those with nongroup coverage, and among those with income levels which would qualify for subsidies or Medicaid. But more than two in five of the uninsured did not expect to gain coverage.

Use of the Marketplaces varied widely by insurance status and income. The main reason the uninsured used the Marketplace was to find out if they were eligible for subsidies or Medicaid. While many with nongroup insurance were also interested in finding out if they were eligible for subsidies or Medicaid, the most common reason they gave for using the Marketplace was to compare their current health plan with Marketplace plans. There were differences in how people accessed information about health insurance in the Marketplace by education, income, and ethnicity.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,052 other followers