Archive

Archive for the ‘prisons and prisoners’ Category

CRS — The Bureau of Prisons (BOP): Operations and Budget

April 22, 2014 Comments off

The Bureau of Prisons (BOP): Operations and Budget (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

The Bureau of Prisons (BOP) was established in 1930 to house federal inmates, professionalize the prison service, and ensure consistent and centralized administration of the federal prison system. The BOP is the largest correctional agency in the country, in terms of the number of prisoners under its jurisdiction. The BOP must confine any offender convicted and sentenced to a term of imprisonment in a federal court.

About these ads

The Treatment of Persons with Mental Illness in Prisons and Jails

April 14, 2014 Comments off

The Treatment of Persons with Mental Illness in Prisons and Jails
Source: Treatment Advocacy Center
From Executive Summary:

Prisons and jails have become America’s “new asylums”: The number of individuals with serious mental illness in prisons and jails now exceeds the number in state psychiatric hospitals tenfold. Most of the mentally ill individuals in prisons and jails would have been treated in state psychiatric hospitals in the years before the deinstitutionalization movement led to closing the hospitals, a trend that continues even today.

The treatment of mentally ill individuals in prisons and jails is critical, especially since such individuals are vulnerable and often abused while incarcerated. Untreated, their psychiatric illness often gets worse, and they leave prison or jail sicker than when they entered. Individuals in prison and jails have a right to receive medical care, and this right pertains to serious mental illness just as it pertains to tuberculosis, diabetes, or hypertension. This right to treatment has been affirmed by the US Supreme Court.

“The Treatment of Persons with Mental Illness in Prisons and Jails” is the first national survey of such treatment practices. It focuses on the problem of treating seriously mentally ill inmates who refuse treatment, usually because they lack awareness of their own illness and do not think they are sick. What are the treatment practices for these individuals in prisons and jails in each state? What are the consequences if such individuals are not treated?

To address these questions, an extensive survey of professionals in state and county corrections systems was undertaken. Sheriffs, jail administrators, and others who were interviewed for the survey expressed compassion for inmates with mental illness and frustration with the mental health system that is failing them. There were several other points of consensus among those interviewed:

  • Not only are the numbers of mentally ill in prisons and jails continuing to climb, the severity of inmates’ illnesses is on the rise as well.
  • Many inmates with mental illness need intensive treatment, and officials in the prisons and jails feel compelled to provide the hospital-level care these inmates need.
  • The root cause of the problem is the continuing closure of state psychiatric hospitals and the failure of mental health officials to provide appropriate aftercare for the released patients.

Solitary Confinement and Risk of Self-Harm Among Jail Inmates

March 27, 2014 Comments off

Solitary Confinement and Risk of Self-Harm Among Jail Inmates (PDF)
Source: American Journal of Public Health

Objectives.
We sought to better understand acts of self-harm among inmates in correctional institutions.

Methods.
We analyzed data from medical records on 244 699 incarcerations in the New York City jail system from January 1, 2010, through January 31, 2013.

Results.
In 1303 (0.05%) of these incarcerations, 2182 acts of self-harm were committed, (103 potentially fatal and 7 fatal). Although only 7.3% of admissions included any solitary confinement, 53.3% of acts of self-harm and 45.0% of acts of potentially fatal self-harm occurred within this group. After we controlled for gender, age, race/ethnicity, serious mental illness, and length of stay, we found self-harm to be associated significantly with being in solitary confinement at least once, serious mental illness, being aged 18 years or younger, and being Latino or White, regardless of gender.

Conclusions.
These self-harm predictors are consistent with our clinical impressions as jail health service managers. Because of this concern, the New York City jail system has modified its practices to direct inmates with mental illness who violate jail rules to more clinical settings and eliminate solitary confinement for those with serious mental illness.

Mentoring Children of Incarcerated Parents: A Synthesis of Research and Input From the Listening Session Held by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention and the White House Domestic Policy Council and Office of Public Engagement

March 21, 2014 Comments off

Mentoring Children of Incarcerated Parents: A Synthesis of Research and Input From the Listening Session Held by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention and the White House Domestic Policy Council and Office of Public Engagement (PDF)
Source: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

Parents may be incarcerated in correctional facilities at either the local or state level and the length of incarceration varies by type of facility. Jails are locally-operated correctional facilities and sentences to jail (typically for misdemeanors) are usually one year or shorter, whereas prisons (state or federal) are typically further away and generally involve sentences (typically for felonies) that are longer than one year. The number of youth who have an incarcerated parent has grown considerably over the past two decades. It is estimated that 1.7 million youth in the United States have at least one parent currently in prison and that millions more have a parent in jail. As a group, these youth fare worse than other youth on a range of immediate and longer-term outcomes that relate to mental and physical health as well as educational achievement. Evidence suggests that, in combination with other sources of risk and adversity, the incarceration of a parent can increase the likelihood that youth become involved in antisocial and delinquent behavior. Yet, it is clear that parental incarceration affects families in different ways and that experiences before, during, and after incarceration contribute to youths’outcomes. Furthermore, as many youth faced with the incarceration of a parent do well, a parent’s incarceration is clearly not an insurmountable barrier to a young person realizing his or her full potential.

The broader research literature supports mentoring programs as a promising form of support for youth with incarcerated parents. Findings indicate that participation in a mentoring program can benefit a young person in several different areas, including emotional well-being, social relationships, avoiding problem behavior, and academic achievement.

CRS — Offender Reentry: Correctional Statistics, Reintegration into the Community, and Recidivism

March 13, 2014 Comments off

Offender Reentry: Correctional Statistics, Reintegration into the Community, and Recidivism (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via University of Iowa Law Library)

The prison population in the United States has been growing steadily for more than 30 years. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports that since 1990 an average of 590,400 inmates have been released annually from state and federal prisons and almost 5 million ex-offenders are under some form of community-based supervision. Offender reentry can include all the activities and programming conducted to prepare ex-convicts to return safely to the community and to live as law-abiding citizens. Some ex-offenders, however, eventually end up back in prison. The most recent national-level recidivism study is 10 years old; this study showed that two-thirds of exoffenders released in 1994 came back into contact with the criminal justice system within three years of their release. Compared with the average American, ex-offenders are less educated, less likely to be gainfully employed, and more likely to have a history of mental illness or substance abuse—all of which have been shown to be risk factors for recidivism.

CRS — Early Release for Federal Inmates: Fact Sheet

March 10, 2014 Comments off

Early Release for Federal Inmates: Fact Sheet (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

Congress has shown interest in ways to reduce the size of the federal prison population by reducing the amount of time inmates serve in prison though such measures as allowing inmates to earn credit toward their sentences for participating in rehabilitative programs. In considering whether or how to modify existing federal sentencing policy, some policymakers might be interested in examining existing means to reduce a federal inmate’s sentence. This fact sheet highlights current authorities available to provide for the early release of federal inmates.

Medicare Improperly Paid Millions of Dollars for Prescription Drugs Provided to Incarcerated Beneficiaries During 2006 Through 2010

February 10, 2014 Comments off

Medicare Improperly Paid Millions of Dollars for Prescription Drugs Provided to Incarcerated Beneficiaries During 2006 Through 2010
Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General

An individual is eligible for Medicare Part D benefits if he or she is entitled to Medicare benefits under Part A or enrolled in Part B and lives in the service area of a Part D plan. Federal regulations specify that facilities in which individuals are incarcerated are not to be regarded as being within service areas for purposes of Part D coverage.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) inappropriately accepted prescription drug event (PDE) records submitted by Part D sponsors for prescription drugs provided to incarcerated beneficiaries and used those records to make its final payment determinations. Specifically, for 49 of the 100 beneficiaries that we sampled, CMS accepted 1,298 PDE records submitted by sponsors for prescription drugs provided to incarcerated beneficiaries. The gross drug costs associated with these 1,298 accepted PDE records totaled $326,000. On the basis of our sample results, we estimated that CMS accepted PDE records with gross drug costs totaling an additional $11.7 million for incarcerated beneficiaries.

CMS inappropriately accepted PDE records submitted by sponsors for prescription drugs provided to incarcerated beneficiaries because it had inadequate internal controls during our review. Additionally, CMS did not provide sufficient and timely information to sponsors that would have allowed them to readily and accurately verify a beneficiary’s incarceration status and dates of incarceration.

We recommended that CMS (1) resolve improper Part D payments made for prescription drugs provided to incarcerated beneficiaries; (2) strengthen internal controls to ensure that Medicare does not pay for prescription drugs for incarcerated beneficiaries; and (3) identify and resolve improper payments made for prescription drugs provided to incarcerated beneficiaries, which would include the estimated additional gross drug costs identified in this report, by reopening and revising final payment determinations for all periods before implementation of the enhanced policies and procedures that would contribute to the strengthened internal controls. CMS concurred with our first two recommendations but did not concur with our third recommendation.

Pregnancy- and Child-Related Legal and Policy Issues Concerning Justice-Involved Women

February 7, 2014 Comments off

Pregnancy- and Child-Related Legal and Policy Issues Concerning Justice-Involved Women (PDF)
Source: National Institute of Corrections

This document provides an overview of pregnancy- and child-related legal questions concerning justice-involved women that can be raised in correctional settings. It updates and expands the Legal Appendix, written by Southwestern Law School Professor Myrna Raeder, that is included in Gender-Responsive Strategies: Research, Practice, and Guiding Principles for Women Offenders, by Barbara Bloom and colleagues, published by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) in 2003. The information presented here is expected to be pertinent to a wide audience, only some of whom have legal training. Commissioners of correctional departments and their legal staff, wardens, sheriffs, and other prison and jail administrators; community correctional officials; service providers; and stakeholders, including advocates for inmates, should all be able to reference this document as a starting point for analyzing family issues that affect a large percentage of female inmates. A variety of resources, legal and otherwise, are cited to help further research about these issues. Administrators and policymakers may find it useful to review their policies in light of these pregnancy- and child-related legal questions and answers, with the caveat that their responses must be dictated in part by the specific laws and policies that exist in the particular jurisdiction where their facility is located, and by the specific circumstances of each issue that arises.

Guidelines for the Successful Transition of People with Behavioral Health Disorders from Jail and Prison

February 6, 2014 Comments off

Guidelines for the Successful Transition of People with Behavioral Health Disorders from Jail and Prison (PDF)
Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Despite the significant number of individuals with behavioral disorders in the criminal justice system, 2010 marked the first time in nearly 40 years that the number of state prisoners in the United States declined. To achieve better outcomes, policymakers and researchers agree that a shift away from a reliance on incarceration to an emphasis on expanding capacity to supervise and treat individuals in the community is necessary. This shift has focused attention on the importance of cross-system approaches to providing effective criminal justice and behavioral health treatment interventions with the dual goals of reducing recidivism and promoting recovery. A critical component of cross-system work occurs at the transition from jail or prison to the community. Reentry into the community is a vulnerable time, marked by difficulties adjusting, increased drug use and a 12-fold increased risk of death in the first two weeks after release.23 Effective transition planning and implementation can minimize the risk of these hazards, enhance public safety by increasing the possibility that individuals will participate in and complete supervision and treatment requirements, and improve individual outcomes.

Mentoring Children of Incarcerated Parents

February 4, 2014 Comments off

Mentoring Children of Incarcerated Parents (PDF)
Source: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

Parents may be incarcerated in correctional facilities at either the local or state level and the length of incarceration varies by type of facility. Jails are locally-operated correctional facilities and sentences to jail (typically for misdemeanors) are usually one year or shorter, whereas prisons (state or federal) are typically further away and generally involve sentences (typically for felonies) that are longer than one year. The number of youth who have an incarcerated parent has grown considerably over the past two decades. It is estimated that 1.7 million youth in the United States have at least one parent currently in prison and that millions more have a parent in jail. As a group, these youth fare worse than other youth on a range of immediate and longer-term outcomes that relate to mental and physical health as well as educational achievement. Evidence suggests that, in combination with other sources of risk and adversity, the incarceration of a parent can increase the likelihood that youth become involved in antisocial and delinquent behavior. Yet, it is clear that parental incarceration affects families in different ways and that experiences before, during, and after incarceration contribute to youths’ outcomes. Furthermore, as many youth faced with the incarceration of a parent do well, a parent’s incarceration is clearly not an insurmountable barrier to a young person realizing his or her full potential.

The broader research literature supports mentoring programs as a promising form of support for youth with incarcerated parents. Findings indicate that participation in a mentoring program can benefit a young person in several different areas, including emotional well-being, social relationships, avoiding problem behavior, and academic achievement.

National Institute of Corrections — Sexually Abusive Behavior Prevention and Intervention Program

February 3, 2014 Comments off

Sexually Abusive Behavior Prevention and Intervention Program
Source: National Institute of Corrections

This document intends to “provide a written policy that implements zero tolerance toward all forms of sexual activity, including sexual abuse and sexual harassment, and to provide guidelines to address the following prohibited and/or illegal sexually abusive behavior involving: Inmate perpetrator against staff victim; Inmate perpetrator against inmate victim; [and] Staff perpetrator against inmate victim. This policy also covers incidents involving contractors and volunteers. These guidelines are provided to: Help detect incidents, perpetrators, and inmate victims of sexually abusive behavior; Help prevent sexually abusive behavior; Educate staff to intervene properly and in a timely manner; Document, report, and investigate reported incidents; [and] Discipline and/or prosecute perpetrators” (p. 1). Procedures explain: prevention planning; responsive planning; training and education; screening for risk of sexual victimization and abusiveness; reporting; official response following an inmate report; investigations; discipline; medical and mental care; data collection and review; and audits. Also attached is the “PREA Intake Objective Screening Instrument”.

Investigation of the Julia Tutwiler Prison for Women and Notice of Expanded Investigation

January 29, 2014 Comments off

Investigation of the Julia Tutwiler Prison for Women and Notice of Expanded Investigation (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Justice (Civil Rights Division)

The Special Litigation Section of the Civil Rights Division has concluded its investigation of allegations of sexual abuse and sexual harassment at the Julia Tutwiler Prison for Women pursuant to the Civil Rights o Institutionalized Persons Act (“CRIP A”), 42 U.S.C. § 1997. CRIP A authorizes the Department of Justice (“001″) to seek equitable relief where prison conditions violate the constitutional rights of prisoners in state correctional facilities. Consistent with the statutory requirements of CRIPA, we write to inform you of our findings, the facts supporting them, and the minimum remedial steps necessary to address the identified deficiencies. We conclude that the State of Alabama violates the Eighth Amendment of the United States Constitution by failing to protect women prisoners at Tutwiler from harm due to sexual abuse and harassment from correctional staff.

Death Row Confessions and the Last Meal Test of Innocence

January 29, 2014 Comments off

Death Row Confessions and the Last Meal Test of Innocence
Source: Social Science Research Network

Post hoc analyses of Rector v. Arkansas have regularly highlighted that the defendant requested that part of his last meal be saved so that he could it eat later. While the observation is typically raised as part of arguments that Rector was incompetent and unfit for execution, the more basic fact is that commentators have drawn important inferences about Rector’s mental state from how he treated his last meal. In this essay, we draw upon multiple disciplines in order to apply the same inferential logic to a much broader sample and explore the question of whether traditionally customized last meals might offer signals of defendants’ guilt or innocence. To investigate this, the content of last-meal requests and last words reported for people executed in the United States during a recent five-year period were examined. Consistent with the idea that declination of the last meal is equivalent to a signal of (self-perceived) innocence, those who denied guilt were 2.7 times as likely to decline a last meal than people who admitted guilt (29% versus 8%). Consistent with the complementary theory that people who admit guilt are relatively more “at peace” with their sentence, these individuals requested 34% more calories of food than the rest of the sample (2786 versus 2085 calories). A third finding is that those who denied guilt also tended to eat significantly fewer brand-name food items. Previous discussions of last meals have often lacked quantitative measurements; however, this systematic analysis shows that last meal requests offer windows into self-perceived or self-proclaimed innocence. Knowing one’s last meal request and one’s last words can provide valuable new variables for retrospectively assessing the processes that led to past executions.

Survey of Sexual Violence in Adult Correctional Facilities, 2009–11 – Statistical Tables

January 27, 2014 Comments off

Survey of Sexual Violence in Adult Correctional Facilities, 2009–11 – Statistical Tables
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents jurisdiction- and facility-level counts of allegations and substantiated incidents of nonconsensual sexual acts, abusive sexual contacts, staff sexual misconduct, and staff sexual harassment reported by correctional authorities in adult prisons, jails, and other correctional facilities in 2009, 2010, and 2011. Facilities include the Federal Bureau of Prisons, state prison systems, facilities operated by the U.S. military and Immigration and Customs Enforcement, sampled jail jurisdictions, privately operated jails and prisons, and jails in Indian country. These tables accompany Sexual Victimization Reported by Adult Correctional Authorities, 2009–11, which provides national estimates and rates of sexual victimization as well as an in-depth examination of substantiated incidents, covering the number and characteristics of victims and perpetrators, location, time of day, nature of the injuries, impact on the victims, and sanctions imposed on the perpetrators. Data are from the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ Survey of Sexual Violence (SSV), which has annually collected official records on allegations and substantiated incidents of inmate-on-inmate and staff-on-inmate sexual victimization since 2004.

Local Government Corrections Expenditures, FY 2005-2011

January 15, 2014 Comments off

Local Government Corrections Expenditures, FY 2005-2011
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Presents data on local government corrections expenditures from fiscal years 2005 to 2011. This report examines trends in local government spending to build and operate correctional institutions and spending for other corrections functions such as probation. It compares trends in local government spending on corrections with trends in local spending on police protection, judicial-legal services, public welfare, education, health and hospitals, and highways. It also compares state and local expenditures on correctional institutions. Data are from the Census Bureau’s State and Local Government Finance Survey, which collects information on state and local expenditures and revenues.

Medicaid and Financing Health Care for Individuals Involved with the Criminal Justice System

January 14, 2014 Comments off

Medicaid and Financing Health Care for Individuals Involved with the Criminal Justice System (PDF)
Source: Council of State Governments

When an individual returns to the community after incarceration, disruptions in the continuity of medical care have been shown to increase rates of reincarceration and lead to poorer and more costly health outcomes.6 Research shows that the first few weeks after release from incarceration are the most critical in terms of connecting people to treatment. Reentry into the community is a vulnerable time, marked by difficulties adjusting, increased drug use, and a 12- fold increase in the risk of death in the first two weeks after release. For many, the failure to provide a link to healthcare coverage and services upon release results in needless, potentially months-long gaps in their access to health care. If they access care at all, these individuals often rely upon hospital emergency room services, shifting much of the cost burden to hospitals and state, county, and city agencies.

This failure to link individuals involved with the criminal justice system to health coverage and services upon release from incarceration is especially costly to state and local governments. Total state and local spending on uncompensated health care for the uninsured reached $17.2 billion in 2008.9 Individuals involved with the criminal justice system, who make up as much as one-third of the uninsured population in the United States, can be expected to account for a significant portion of this spending. Furthermore, elevated recidivism rates, which are associated with a lack of access to health care for individuals with mental illnesses or substance use disorders, contribute to the burden of state and local corrections spending.

The appropriate use of federal Medicaid dollars to help pay for health care provided to this population can save states and localities money, in addition to minimizing health and public safety concerns associated with reentry following incarceration. However, opportunities to maximize and maintain Medicaid enrollment for eligible individuals in this population, and especially to make use of Medicaid to finance certain types of care provided to those who are incarcerated, have been largely underutilized by states.

New Urban Institute Research Briefs on “Low Income Men”

January 13, 2014 Comments off

New Urban Institute Research Briefs on “Low Income Men”
Source: Urban Institute

+ Education and Employment of Disconnected Low-Income Men
Margaret Simms, Karina Fortuny, Marla McDaniel, William Monson
This brief explores the education and employment outcomes of disconnected low-income men in 2008–10. These men have lower education levels than higher-income men. Among low-income men, Hispanics are less likely than African Americans and whites to complete high school. Low-income men are more likely to be unemployed and underemployed; African Americans are the most likely to be unemployed. Education and employment rates for low-income men vary considerably by metropolitan area.

+ Summary of an Urban Ethnographers’ Symposium on Low-Income Men
Margaret Simms, Marla McDaniel, William Monson
The Urban Institute, with funding from the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, US Department of Health and Human Services, convened a symposium to explore the state of knowledge on disconnected low-income men and promising strategies for improving their well-being, focusing particularly on men of color. The participants included ethnographers and other qualitative researchers, social service providers, foundation program officers, and federal government staff. The candid insights offered enriched understanding of the complex problems faced by low-income men, the programs currently serving their needs, and some of the issues about which more study is needed.

+ Imprisonment and Disenfranchisement of Disconnected Low-Income Men
Marla McDaniel, Margaret Simms, William Monson, Karina Fortuny
Incarceration rates have risen over time and vary by race and ethnicity, reflecting changes in federal and state crime policies over the past few decades. In 2011, African American men were six times more likely and Hispanics nearly two and half times more likely to be imprisoned than white men. This brief summarizes some of the disparate impacts these policies have had on African American and Hispanic men and the consequences for their families and communities.

+ Low-Income Men at the Margins: Caught at the Intersection of Race, Place and Poverty
Margaret Simms, Marla McDaniel, William Monson, Karina Fortuny
A large number of US men of prime working age are neither gainfully employed nor pursuing education or other training, suggesting a potentially significant disconnection from mainstream economic and social life. This paper concentrates on the experiences and challenges of men at the margins between the ages of 18 and 44, when most American males are engaged in such activities as working and building skills, forming and strengthening families, and linking to social institutions. The review focuses on their experiences in five domains: education, employment, family, criminal justice, and health, featuring key themes from ethnographic and other qualitative research.

+ The Health of Disconnected Low-Income Men
Margaret Simms, Marla McDaniel, William Monson, Karina Fortuny
This brief examines the health insurance coverage and health status of disconnected low-income men from 2008 to 2010, focusing primarily on men’s connections to health care providers and systems. Less than half of low-income men age 18–44 in the United States have any insurance coverage; coverage rates vary significantly by state, citizenship, ethnicity, and education. Compared with higher-income men the same age, low-income men also have lower access to routine health care and have worse health outcomes.

+ A Demographic Snapshot of Disconnected Low-Income Men
Marla McDaniel, Margaret Simms, Karina Fortuny, William Monson
In 2008-10, 16.5 million civilian men nationwide age 18-44 lived in families with incomes below 200 percent of the federal poverty level; 15 million of these men lacked college degrees. Low-income men are more likely to have never married than men the same age nationwide, and they are disproportionately African American or Hispanic. Using data from the American Community Survey, this brief presents estimates of the number of low-income men in the 50 states and the District of Columbia, focusing on metropolitan areas with at least 50,000 low-income men.

Pregnancy and Child-Related Legal and Policy Issues Concerning Justice-Involved Women

December 18, 2013 Comments off

Pregnancy and Child-Related Legal and Policy Issues Concerning Justice-Involved Women
Source: National Institute of Corrections

The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is pleased to announce the release of “Pregnancy and Child – Related Legal and Policy Issues Concerning Justice-Involved Women”. The document cites a wide range of resources to assist correctional professionals,027701 administrators, policymakers, and related professionals. It provides a legal context to review current policy and practice specific to the laws and policies that affect justice-involved women. The document is a follow up to “Legal Considerations with Regard to Women Offenders,” an appendix to Gender Responsive Strategies: Research Practice, and Guiding Principles for Women Offenders by Bloom, Owen & Covington (PDF).

State Initiatives to Address Aging Prisoners

December 12, 2013 Comments off

State Initiatives to Address Aging Prisoners (PDF)
Source: Office of Legislative Research, Connecticut General Assembly

This report provides examples of initiatives to cope with the aging prisoner population in California, Florida, Louisiana, Nevada, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Washington. Other states have similar initiatives.

New From the GAO

December 6, 2013 Comments off

New GAO Reports
Source: Government Accountability Office

Reports

1. Medicaid: CMS Should Ensure That States Clearly Report Overpayments. GAO-14-25, December 6.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-25
Highlights - http://www.gao.gov/assets/660/659502.pdf

2. Internal Controls: Corrective Actions Under Way to Address Control Deficiencies at the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation. GAO-14-95, December 6.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-95
Highlights - http://www.gao.gov/assets/660/659505.pdf

3. Bureau of Prisons: Opportunities Exist to Enhance the Transparency of Annual Budget Justifications. GAO-14-121, December 6.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-121
Highlights - http://www.gao.gov/assets/660/659519.pdf

Reissued Reports

1. Immigration Detention: Additional Actions Could Strengthen DHS Efforts to Address Sexual Abuse. GAO-14-38, December 6.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-38
Highlights - http://www.gao.gov/assets/660/659146.pdf

This report was revised on December 6, 2013, to correct a date on the Highlights page and text regarding substantiated allegations on page 61.

2. Workforce Investment Act: Results for Survey of Workforce Investment Boards (GAO-14-20SP, December 2013), an E-supplement to GAO-14-19. GAO-14-20SP, December 6.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-20SP

This e-supplement was revised on December 6, 2013, to correct part of the title.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 784 other followers