Archive

Archive for the ‘Office of National Drug Control Policy’ Category

CRS — Reauthorizing the Office of National Drug Control Policy: Issues for Consideration (September 30, 2014)

October 8, 2014 Comments off

Reauthorizing the Office of National Drug Control Policy: Issues for Consideration (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) is located in the Executive Office of the President and has the responsibility for creating policies, priorities, and objectives for the federal Drug Control Program. This national program is aimed at reducing the use, manufacturing, and trafficking of illicit drugs and the reduction of drug-related crime and violence and of drug-related health consequences. The director of ONDCP has primary responsibilities of developing a comprehensive National Drug Control Strategy (Strategy) to direct the nation’s anti-drug efforts; developing a National Drug Control Budget (Budget) to implement the National Drug Control Strategy, including determining the adequacy of the drug control budgets submitted by contributing federal Drug Control Program agencies; and evaluating the effectiveness of the National Drug Control Strategy implementation by the various agencies contributing to the Drug Control Program. Authorization for ONDCP expired at the end of FY2010, but it has continued to receive appropriations. Congress, while continuously charged with ONDCP’s oversight, is now faced with its possible reauthorization.

About these ads

CRS — Reauthorizing the Office of National Drug Control Policy: Issues for Consideration

September 3, 2013 Comments off

Reauthorizing the Office of National Drug Control Policy: Issues for Consideration (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) is located in the Executive Office of the President and has the responsibility for creating policies, priorities, and objectives for the federal Drug Control Program. This national program is aimed at reducing the use, manufacturing, and trafficking of illicit drugs and the reduction of drug-related crime and violence and of drug- related health consequences. The director of ONDCP has primary responsibilities of developing a comprehensive National Drug Control Strategy (Strategy) to direct the nation’s anti-drug efforts; developing a National Drug Control Budget (B udget) to implement the National Drug Control Strategy, including determining the adequacy of the drug control budgets submitted by contributing federal Drug Control Program agencies; and evaluating the effectiveness of the National Drug Control Strategy implementation by the various agencies contributing to the Drug Control Program. Authorization for ONDCP expired at the end of FY2010, but it has continued to receive appropriations. Congress, while continuously charged with ONDCP’s oversight, is now faced with its possible reauthorization.

In May 2009, Director R. Gil Kerlikowske called for an end to use of the term “war on drugs.” This is in part because while drug use was previously considered a law enforcement or criminal justice problem, it has transitioned to being viewed more as a public health problem. Indeed, the Obama Administration has indicated that a comprehensive strategy should include a range of prevention, treatment, and law enforcement elements. The 2013 National Drug Control Strategy outlines seven core areas—ranging from strengthening international partnerships to focusing on intervention and treatment efforts in health care—aimed at reducing both illicit drug use and its consequences. The overall goal is to achieve a 15% reduction in the rate of drug use and its consequences over a five-year period (2010-2015).

In creating the National Drug Control Strategy, ONDCP consults with the various federal Drug Control Program agencies. ONDCP then reviews th eir respective drug budgets and incorporates them into the National Drug Control Budget (Budget), which is submitted to Congress as part of the annual appropriations process. As requeste d by Congress in the ONDCP Reauthorization Act of 2006 (P.L. 109-469), the Budget was restructur ed in FY2012, incorporating the activities and budgets of 19 additional federal agencies/programs, to reflect a more complete range of federal drug control spending. The FY2013 Budget incorporated four additional federal agencies/programs, and the FY2014 Budget incorporates one additional federal program. In the FY2014 Budget, there are five priorities for which resources are requested across agencies: substance abuse prevention and substance abuse treatment (both of which are considered demand- reduction areas), and drug interdiction, domestic law enforcement, and international partnerships (the three of which are considered supply-reduc tion areas). The FY2014 Budget proposes to use 58.0% of the funds ($14.723 billion) for supply-side functions and 42.0% of the funds ($10.670 billion) for demand-side functions. Federal drug control activities were appropriated $24.536 billion for FY2013 (P.L. 113-6).

In considering ONDCP’s reauthorization, there are several issues on which policymakers may deliberate. Congress may consider whether to authorize specific supply-reduction or demand- reduction programs. Congress may also exercise oversight regarding ONDCP’s implementation of evidenced-based activities. Another issue that might be debated is whether the revised Budget structure captures the full scope of the nation’s anti-drug activities. Further, ONDCP has created a new Performance Reporting System (PRS) to eval uate annual progress toward each of the Drug Control Program’s strategic goals. Congress ma y exercise oversight regarding the new PRS.

National Southwest Border Counternarcotics Strategy

July 9, 2013 Comments off

National Southwest Border Counternarcotics Strategy (PDF)
Source: Office of National Drug Control Policy (White House)

Strategic Goal:
Substantially reduce the flow of illicit drugs, drug proceeds, and associated instruments of vio­lence across the Southwest border

Strategic Objectives:
1. Enhance criminal intelligence and information sharing capabilities and processes associ­ated with the Southwest border
2. Interdict drugs, drug proceeds, and associated instruments of violence at the ports of entry along the Southwest border
3. Interdict drugs, drug proceeds, and associated instruments of violence between the ports of entry along the Southwest border
4. Interdict drugs, drug proceeds, and associated illicit activities in the air and maritime domains along the Southwest border
5. Disrupt and dismantle drug trafficking organizations operating along the Southwest border by increasing investigations and prosecutions
6. Stem the flow of illicit proceeds across the Southwest border into Mexico
7. Stem the flow of illegal weapons across the Southwest border into Mexico
8. Develop strong and resilient communities that resist criminal activity and promote healthy lifestyles
9. Enhance U.S.–Mexico cooperation on joint counterdrug efforts

New From the GAO

April 25, 2013 Comments off

New GAO Reports and Testimony

Source: Government Accountability Office

Reports

1. Office of National Drug Control Policy: Office Could Better Identify Opportunities to Increase Program Coordination. GAO-13-333, March 26.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-13-333
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/660/653355.pdf

2. Air Force Electronic Systems Center: Reorganization Resulted in Workforce Reassignments at Hanscom Air Force Base, but Other Possible Effects Are Not Yet Known. GAO-13-366, April 25.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-13-366
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/660/654163.pdf

3. Explosive Ordnance Disposal: DOD Needs Better Resource Planning and Joint Guidance to Manage the Capability. GAO-13-385, April 25.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-13-385
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/660/654171.pdf

4. Internal Revenue Service: 2013 Tax Filing Season Performance to Date and Budget Data. GAO-13-541R, April 15.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-13-541R

Testimony

1. Federal Real Property: Excess and Underutilized Property Is an Ongoing Challenge, by David Wise, director, physical infrastructure, before the Subcommittee on Government Operations, House committee on Oversight and Government Reform. GAO-13-573T, April 25.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-13-573T
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/660/654160.pdf

Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs

October 11, 2011 Comments off

Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDF)
Source: Office of National Drug Control Policy

A PDMP is a tool that can be used to address prescription drug diversion and abuse. PDMPs serve multiple functions, including: patient care tool; drug epidemic early warning system; and drug diversion and insurance fraud investigative tool. They help prescribers avoid drug interactions and identify drug-seeking behaviors or “doctor shopping.” PDMPs can also be used by professional licensing boards to identify clinicians with patterns of inappropriate prescribing and dispensing, and to assist law enforcement in cases of controlled substance diversion.

At the same time, protecting patient privacy is of the utmost importance. PDMPs ensure protection of patient information just as well as, if not better than, any other medical record. Law enforcement may not access patient-specific PDMP data unless they have an active investigation, and healthcare providers can access only the PDMP data relevant to their patients.

See also: Response to the Epidemic of Prescription Drug Abuse (PDF)

2011 National Drug Control Strategy

July 11, 2011 Comments off

2011 National Drug Control Strategy
Source: Office of National Drug Control Policy

Drug use affects every sector of society, straining our economy, our healthcare and criminal justice systems, and endangering the futures of our young people. The United States cannot afford to continue paying the devastating toll of illicit drug use and its consequences. In 2007, the most recent year for which data are available, the economic impact of illicit drug use on American society totaled more than $193 billion.

Building on the Obama Administration’s inaugural Strategy, released last year, the 2011 National Drug Control Strategy serves as the Nation’s blueprint for reducing drug use and its consequences. Continuing our collaborative, balanced, and science-based approach, the 2011 National Drug Control Strategy emphasizes drug prevention and early intervention programs in healthcare settings, diverting non-violent drug offenders into treatment instead of jail, funding more scientific research on drug use, expanding access to substance abuse treatment, and supporting those in recovery.

Whether you are a parent looking for information, a community member interested in treatment resources, a police officer or local elected official searching for new approaches to drug-related crimes, or someone who wants to know more about the Administration’s drug policy, the National Drug Control Strategy serves as a useful resource.

Majority of Adult Males Arrested in 10 U.S. Cities Test Positive for Illegal Drugs At Time of Arrest

June 16, 2011 Comments off

Majority of Adult Males Arrested in 10 U.S. Cities Test Positive for Illegal Drugs At Time of Arrest
Source: Office of National Drug Control Policy

Today, Gil Kerlikowske, Director of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) released the 2010 Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring Annual Report (ADAM II). The 2010 report reveals that in the 10 participating cities/counties, more than half of adult males arrested for crimes ranging from misdemeanors to felonies tested positive for at least one drug. Positive test results ranged from 52 percent in Washington, DC, to 83 percent in Chicago, Illinois, illustrating the link between drug use and crime and highlighting the importance of Obama Administration drug policies designed to break the cycle of drug use, arrest, incarceration, release, and re-arrest.

Some key findings from the report:

  • The percent of arrestees testing positive for any drug ranged from a low of 52 percent in Washington, DC, to a high of 83% in Chicago.
  • Fewer adult male arrestees are testing positive for cocaine. Nine of ten sites showed a significant decrease in 2010, compared to 2007.
  • Sacramento (33 percent) and Portland (20 percent) showed the highest rates of adult males testing positive for meth in 2010.
  • An increasing number of arrestees are testing positive for marijuana in Charlotte, New York City, and Sacramento in 2010, compared to 2009.
  • Four of ten cities surveyed (Charlotte, Indianapolis, Portland, and Sacramento) showed significant increases in the percentage of arrestees testing positive for opiates in 2010, compared to 2008, while Chicago dropped by nearly half over the same period. Two of these cities (Indianapolis and Portland) also showed significant increases in oxycodone/hydrocodone positive rates.

+ Full Report

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 964 other followers