Archive

Archive for the ‘nonprofits and volunteerism’ Category

Donor Governance and Financial Management in Prominent U.S. Art Museums

June 29, 2015 Comments off

Donor Governance and Financial Management in Prominent U.S. Art Museums
Source: Social Science Research Service

I study “donor governance,” which occurs when contributors to non-profit firms place restrictions on their gifts to limit the discretion of managers. In a study of U.S. art museums, I find that this practice has grown significantly in recent years, and it represents the largest source of permanent capital in the industry. When donor restrictions are strong, museums shift their cost structures away from administration and toward program services, and they exhibit very high savings rates, retaining in their endowments 45 cents of each incremental dollar donated. Retention rates are near zero for cash generated from other activities. Restricted donations appear to stabilize non-profits and significantly influence their activities, but they reduce management flexibility and may contribute to lower profit margins. Rising donor governance in U.S. art museums may represent a reaction by contributors to the industry’s high rates of financial distress, weak boards of trustees, and large private benefits of control enjoyed by managers.

Quantifying Hope: Philanthropic Support for Black Men and Boys

June 29, 2015 Comments off

Quantifying Hope: Philanthropic Support for Black Men and Boys
Source: BMAfunders (Open Society Foundations and Foundation Center)

Quantifying Hope: Philanthropic Support for Black Men and Boys analyzes U.S. funding trends for Black men and boys and describes recent initiatives in the field of Black male achievement.

Following up on the analysis in Where Do We Go From Here? Philanthropic Support for Black Men and Boys, the 2015 research brief shows a distinct trend toward increased U.S. foundation funding for organizations and programs that are working to improve the life outcomes of Black males.

Health Reform Five Years Later: Philanthropy Steps Up to the Challenge

June 9, 2015 Comments off

Health Reform Five Years Later: Philanthropy Steps Up to the Challenge
Source: Grantmakers in Health

In this report, GIH describes the full spectrum of ways in which foundations have engaged in health reform-related efforts—both coverage expansion and health system transformation—since passage of the 2010 Affordable Care Act.

Download the report to learn more about:

  • philanthropy’s funding priorities and strategies over the last five years,
  • the issues health funders identify as the most critical to address over the next two years,
  • state and national advocates’ perspectives on where foundations and corporate giving programs should focus their efforts,
  • regional snapshots that demonstrate variations across the country, and
  • recommendations for grantmakers to consider as they plan their next generation of work.

UK — Technical Issues in Charity Law

March 31, 2015 Comments off

Technical Issues in Charity Law
Source: Law Commission of England

This project originated from our Eleventh Programme of Law Reform. Part of the project is a review of the procedures by which charities governed by Royal Charter and by Act of Parliament amend their governing documents. The remainder of the project comprises certain issues arising out of the review of the Charities Act 2006 conducted by Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts regarding:

  • the procedures by which charities change their purposes and the administrative provisions of their governing documents;
  • the application of property cy-près, including the application cy-près of the proceeds of fundraising appeals;
  • the regulation of the acquisition, disposal and mortgage of land by charities;
  • the remuneration of a trustee of a charity for the supply of goods to the charity;
  • the power to award an equitable allowance to a trustee who has obtained an unauthorised profit;
  • the power for trustees to make ex gratia payments out of the funds of the charity;
  • the transfer of assets and liabilities on incorporation and merger, and gifts made by will to charities that have merged;
  • the availability of property held on charitable trust in the insolvency of a trustee;
  • the power of the Charity Commission to require a charity to change its name, and to refuse to register a charity unless it changes its name;
  • the power for the Charity Commission to determine the identity of the trustees of a charity; and
  • certain powers of the Charity Tribunal.

Measuring Research and Development Expenditures in the U.S. Nonprofit Sector: Conceptual and Design Issues: Summary of a Workshop (2015)

March 24, 2015 Comments off

Measuring Research and Development Expenditures in the U.S. Nonprofit Sector: Conceptual and Design Issues: Summary of a Workshop (2015)
Source: National Research Council

National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (NCSES) of the National Science Foundation is responsible for national reporting of the research and development (R&D) activities that occur in all sectors of the United States economy. For most sectors, including the business and higher education sectors, NCSES collects data on these activities on a regular basis. However, data on R&D within the nonprofit sector have not been collected in 18 years, a time period which has seen dynamic and rapid growth of the sector. NCSES decided to design and implement a new survey of nonprofits, and commissioned this workshop to provide a forum to discuss conceptual and design issues and methods.

Measuring Research and Development Expenditures in the U.S. Nonprofit Sector: Conceptual and Design Issues summarizes the presentations and discussion of the workshop. This report identifies concepts and issues for the design of a survey of R&D expenditures made by nonprofit organizations, considering the goals, content, statistical methodology, data quality, and data products associated with this data collection. The report also considers the broader usefulness of the data for understanding the nature of the nonprofit sector and their R&D activities. Measuring Research and Development Expenditures in the U. S. Nonprofit Sector will help readers understand the role of nonprofit sector given its enormous size and scope as well as its contribution to identifying new forms of R&D beyond production processes and new technology.

NGOs and money laundering: Adapting EU rules to engage NGOs better

March 17, 2015 Comments off

NGOs and money laundering: Adapting EU rules to engage NGOs better
Source: European Parliamentary Research Service

Money laundering (ML) is a major global concern. The minimum identifiable direct costs of organised crime in the European Union (EU) are estimated at around €166 billion a year. Europol, the EU’s law enforcement agency and Eurojust, the EU’s Judicial Cooperation Unit, estimate the minimum costs of fighting organised crime at EU level amount to €210 million a year.

To efficiently tackle ML the EU has stepped up cooperation with civil society, including non-governmental organisations (NGOs). NGOs are engaged as collectors of relevant information on illicit activities, and in developing standards and implementing anti-ML rules. At the same time, however, NGOs are considered ‘subjects at risk’ in the ML framework, either as fronts for terrorist organisations that raise and transfer funds, or as legitimate enterprises that indirectly support the aims of terrorist organisations.

This double-sided position for NGOs may impact on the efficacy of the measures currently in place at EU and international level to certify their transparency and accountability. NGOs, in turn, see such attempts to regulate their activities as a threat to their independence, and thus occasionally resist them.

Heartland Poll — Americans’ Local Experiences

March 12, 2015 Comments off

Americans’ Local Experiences
Source: Heartland Poll (Allstate)

Since 2009, the Allstate/National Journal Heartland Monitor poll has focused on issues that are most important to Americans, including the national economy, personal finances, volunteerism and civic engagement and innovation at the local level. Polls continue to show significant frustration with national institutions during an uneven economic recovery. However, they also revealed Americans’ steadfast self-reliance and desire to see positive change at a local level that improves quality of life for themselves and their communities.

This twenty-second installment of the Heartland Monitor Poll explores Americans’ experiences in their local area, including views on the local economy and their perceptions of local institutions like government, business, and non-profit organizations. What we find here is a clear preference for institutions to take chances with new ideas and solutions rather than relying on tried and tested, but unremarkable approaches. We also see a strong belief that local businesses are the best vehicle to provide job opportunities.

Americans are proud of their local area and they rate it considerably higher than the country in terms of the overall direction and their approval of political leadership. They also rate their local area highly in terms of overall quality of life, a place to start a business, and a place to raise a family. This positive community spirit extends throughout America’s big cities, suburbs, small cities, and rural areas, and also across demographic and socioeconomic subgroups.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,049 other followers