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Current Contraceptive Status Among Women Aged 15–44: United States, 2011–2013

December 16, 2014 Comments off

Current Contraceptive Status Among Women Aged 15–44: United States, 2011–2013 (PDF)
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings
Data from the 2011–2013 National Survey of Family Growth

  • In 2011–2013, 61.7% of the 60.9 million women aged 15–44 in the United States were currently using contraception. The most common contraceptive methods currently being used were the pill (16.0%), female sterilization (15.5%), male condoms (9.4%), and long-acting reversible contraceptives (7.2%).
  • Use of long-acting reversible contraceptives was higher among women aged 25–34 (11.1%) compared with women aged 15–24 (5.0%) and aged 35–44 (5.3%).
  • Current condom use was similar across the three Hispanic origin and race groups shown in this report (about 9%).
  • Current use of female sterilization declined, and use of the pill increased with greater educational attainment. Use of long-acting reversible contraceptives was similar across education, about 8%–10%.

Births in the United States, 2013

December 15, 2014 Comments off

Births in the United States, 2013
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings
Data from the National Vital Statistics System

  • There were 3.93 million births in the United States in 2013, down less than 1% from 2012 and 9% from the 2007 high. The U.S. general fertility rate was at an all-time low in 2013.
  • Birth rates dropped to record lows in 2013 among women under age 30 and rose for most age groups 30 and over.
  • The cesarean delivery rate declined less than 1% from 2012 to 2013, to 32.7% of births. This rate rose nearly 60% from 1996 to 2009, but was down slightly from the 2009 high.
  • The 2013 preterm birth rate was 11.39%, down 1% from 2012 and 11% from the 2006 peak. Declines in preterm rates since 2006 were reported across the United States.
  • The twin birth rate, which had been mostly stable for 2009–2012, rose 2% in 2013 to 33.7 per 1,000 births.

Depression in the U.S. Household Population, 2009–2012

December 11, 2014 Comments off

Depression in the U.S. Household Population, 2009–2012
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings
Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009–2012

  • During 2009–2012, 7.6% of Americans aged 12 and over had depression (moderate or severe depressive symptoms in the past 2 weeks).
  • Depression was more prevalent among females and persons aged 40–59.
  • About 3% of Americans aged 12 and over had severe depressive symptoms, while almost 78% had no symptoms.
  • Persons living below the poverty level were nearly 2½ times more likely to have depression than those at or above the poverty level.
  • Almost 43% of persons with severe depressive symptoms reported serious difficulties in work, home, and social activities.
  • Of those with severe symptoms, 35% reported having contact with a mental health professional in the past year.

Use of Selected Nonmedication Mental Health Services by Adolescent Boys and Girls With Serious Emotional or Behavioral Difficulties: United States, 2010–2012

November 10, 2014 Comments off

Use of Selected Nonmedication Mental Health Services by Adolescent Boys and Girls With Serious Emotional or Behavioral Difficulties: United States, 2010–2012
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings
Data from the National Health Interview Survey, 2010–2012

  • About 4% of adolescents aged 12–17 had a serious emotional or behavioral difficulty and received nonmedication mental health services in the past 6 months.
  • Nearly 71% of adolescents with serious emotional or behavioral difficulties received nonmedication mental health services in the past 6 months.
  • Among adolescents with serious emotional or behavioral difficulties, boys were more likely than girls to receive nonmedication mental health services.
  • Boys with serious emotional or behavioral difficulties were more likely than girls to receive services in school settings.
  • The percentage of boys and girls with serious emotional or behavioral difficulties receiving nonschool services was similar for all settings except for the emergency department.

United States Life Tables, 2010 (November 6, 2014)

November 10, 2014 Comments off

United States Life Tables, 2010 (PDF)
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Objectives—
This report presents complete period life tables for the United States by race, Hispanic origin, and sex, based on age-specific death rates in 2010.

Methods—
Data used to prepare the 2010 life tables are 2010 final mortality statistics; April 1, 2010 population estimates based on the 2010 decennial census; and 2010 Medicare data for persons aged 66-99. The methodology used to estimate the 2010 life tables was first implemented with data year 2008. The methodology used to estimate the life tables for the Hispanic population remains unchanged from that developed for the publication of life tables by Hispanic origin for data year 2006.

Results—
In 2010, the overall expectation of life at birth was 78.7 years. Between 2009 and 2010, life expectancy at birth increased for all groups considered. Life expectancy increased for both males (from 76.0 to 76.2) and females (80.9 to 81.0) and for the white population (78.8 to 78.9), the black population (74.7 to 75.1), the Hispanic population (81.1 to 81.4), the non-Hispanic white population (78.7 to 78.8), and the non-Hispanic black population (74.4 to 74.7).

International Comparisons of Infant Mortality and Related Factors: United States and Europe, 2010

November 7, 2014 Comments off

International Comparisons of Infant Mortality and Related Factors: United States and Europe, 2010 (PDF)
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Infant mortality is an important indicator of the health of a nation because it is associated with a variety of factors such as maternal health, quality and access to medical care, socioeconomic conditions, and public health practices (1–3). After a plateau from 2000 to 2005 (4), the U.S. infant mortality rate declined from 6.87 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 2005 to 6.07 in 2011 (5,6). Yet, the United States’ infant mortality rate remains higher than for most other developed countries (7). This report compares infant mortality rates between the United States and selected European countries and assesses the impact on infant mortality differences of the percentage of preterm births and gestational age-specific infant mortality rates.

Mortality in the United States, 2012

October 15, 2014 Comments off

Mortality in the United States, 2012
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings
Data from the National Vital Statistics System, Mortality

  • Life expectancy at birth for the U.S. population reached a record high of 78.8 years in 2012.
  • The age-adjusted death rate for the United States decreased 1.1% from 2011 to 2012 to a record low of 732.8 per 100,000 standard population.
  • The 10 leading causes of death in 2012 remained the same as in 2011. Age-adjusted death rates decreased significantly from 2011 to 2012 for 8 of the 10 leading causes and increased significantly for one leading cause (suicide).
  • The infant mortality rate decreased 1.5% from 2011 to 2012 to a historic low of 597.8 infant deaths per 100,000 live births. The 10 leading causes of infant death in 2012 remained the same as in 2011.

This report presents 2012 U.S. final mortality data on deaths and death rates by demographic and medical characteristics. These data provide information on mortality patterns among residents of the United States by such variables as sex, race and ethnicity, and cause of death. Information on mortality patterns is key to understanding changes in the health and well-being of the U.S. population. Life expectancy estimates, age-adjusted death rates by race and ethnicity and sex, 10 leading causes of death, and 10 leading causes of infant death were analyzed by comparing 2012 final data with 2011 final data.

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