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Perception of Weight Status in U.S. Children and Adolescents Aged 8–15 Years, 2005–2012

July 24, 2014 Comments off

Perception of Weight Status in U.S. Children and Adolescents Aged 8–15 Years, 2005–2012
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings
Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005–2012

  • About 30% of children and adolescents aged 8–15 years in the United States misperceive their weight status. Weight status misperception is more common among boys (32.3%) than girls (28.0%).
  • About one-third of Mexican-American (34.0%) and non-Hispanic black (34.4%) children and adolescents misperceive their weight status compared with non-Hispanic white children and adolescents (27.7%).
  • Approximately 81% of overweight boys and 71% of overweight girls believe they are about the right weight.
  • Nearly 48% of obese boys and 36% of obese girls consider themselves to be about the right weight.
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Sexual Orientation and Health Among U.S. Adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2013

July 15, 2014 Comments off

Sexual Orientation and Health Among U.S. Adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2013 (PDF)
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Objective—
To provide national estimates for indicators of health-related behaviors, health status, health care service utilization, and health care access by sexual orientation using data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS).

Methods—
NHIS is an annual multipurpose health survey conducted continuously throughout the year. Analyses were based on data collected in 2013 from 34,557 adults aged 18 and over. Sampling weights were used to produce national estimates that are representative of the civilian noninstitutionalized U.S. adult population. Differences in health-related behaviors, health status, health care service utilization, and health care access by sexual orientation were examined for adults aged 18–64, and separately for men and women.

Results—
Based on the 2013 NHIS data, 96.6% of adults identified as straight, 1.6% identified as gay or lesbian, and 0.7% identified as bisexual. The remaining 1.1% of adults identified as ‘‘something else,’’ stated ‘‘I don’t know the answer,’’ or refused to provide an answer. Significant differences were found in health-related behaviors, health status, health care service utilization, and health care access among U.S. adults aged 18–64 who identified as straight, gay or lesbian, or bisexual.

Conclusion—
NHIS sexual orientation data can be used to track progress toward meeting the Healthy People 2020 goals and objectives related to the health of lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons. In addition, the data can be used to examine a wide range of health disparities among adults identifying as straight, gay or lesbian, or bisexual.

TV Watching and Computer Use in U.S. Youth Aged 12–15, 2012

July 15, 2014 Comments off

TV Watching and Computer Use in U.S. Youth Aged 12–15, 2012
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings

Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey, 2012

  • Nearly all (98.5%) youth aged 12–15 reported watching TV daily.
  • More than 9 in 10 (91.1%) youth aged 12–15 reported using the computer daily outside of school.
  • In 2012, 27.0% of youth aged 12–15 had 2 hours or less of TV plus computer use daily.
  • Among youth aged 12–15, girls (80.4%) were more likely to use the computer 2 hours or less daily when compared with boys (69.4%).
  • Fewer non-Hispanic black youth aged 12–15 (53.4%) reported watching 2 hours or less of TV daily than non-Hispanic white (65.8%) and Hispanic (68.7%) youth.

Excessive screen-time behaviors, such as using a computer and watching TV, for more than 2 hours daily have been linked with elevated blood pressure, elevated serum cholesterol, and being overweight or obese among youth (1–3). Additionally, screen-time behavior established in adolescence has been shown to track into adulthood (4). The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-supported Expert Panel and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommend that children limit leisure screen time to 2 hours or less daily (5,6). This report presents national estimates of TV watching and computer use outside of the school day.

Prevalence of Incontinence Among Older Americans

July 9, 2014 Comments off

Prevalence of Incontinence Among Older Americans (PDF)
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Objective
This report presents national estimates of incontinence prevalence in the United States using data source-specific definitions of incontinence among persons aged 65 and over by sociodemographic characteristics during 2007–2010.

Methods
Data are from the 2007–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities (NSRCF), the 2007 National Home and Hospice Care Survey (NHHCS), and the 2009 Long Term Care Minimum Data Set (MDS). Findings are based on in-home interviews with 2,625 noninstitutionalized respondents (NHANES) and reports provided by designated facility or agency staff members for 6,856 residential care facility (RCF) residents (NSRCF), 3,226 current home health care patients (NHHCS), 3,918 hospice discharges (NHHCS), and 2,416,705 nursing home residents (MDS). Response rates for incontinence questions were 84% among noninstitutionalized persons (NHANES), 98% among RCF residents and home health and hospice care patients (NSRCF and NHHCS), and 99% for nursing home residents (MDS).

Results
This is the first report presenting national estimates on incontinence for subpopulations of older persons sampled in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics surveys and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ Long Term Care Minimum Data Set. Because a different definition of incontinence is used by each data collection system, it is not possible to make data comparisons between them or to summarize results across all surveys. Accordingly, only survey-specific results are presented. Including recent data from all of these data collection systems facilitates a multidimensional picture of incontinence, while underscoring the need for a standardized definition.

Wireless Substitution: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, July–December 2013

July 8, 2014 Comments off

Wireless Substitution: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, July–December 2013 (PDF)
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Preliminary results from the July–December 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) indicate that the number of American homes with only wireless telephones continues to grow. Two in every five American homes (41.0%) had only wireless telephones (also known as cellular telephones, cell phones, or mobile phones) during the second half of 2013—an increase of 1.6 percentage points since the first half of 2013 and 2.8 percentage points since the second half of 2012. However, these increases are smaller than those observed in previous years. This report presents the most up-to-date estimates available from the federal government concerning the size and characteristics of these populations.

Trends in Electronic Health Record System Use Among Office-based Physicians: United States, 2007–2012

May 23, 2014 Comments off

Trends in Electronic Health Record System Use Among Office-based Physicians: United States, 2007–2012 (PDF)
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Objectives—
This report presents trends in the adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) by office-based physicians during 2007–2012. Rates of adoption are compared by selected physician and practice characteristics.

Methods—
The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) is based on a national probability sample of nonfederal office-based physicians who see patients in an office setting. Prior to 2008, data on physician characteristics were collected through in-person interviews with physicians. To increase the sample for analyzing physician adoption of EHR systems, starting in 2008, NAMCS physician interview data were supplemented with data from an EHR mail survey. This report presents estimates from the 2007 in-person interviews, combined 2008–2010 data from both the in-person interviews and the EHR mail surveys, and 2011–2012 data from the EHR mail surveys. Sample data were weighted to produce national estimates of office-based physician characteristics and their practices.

Results—
In 2012, 71.8% of office-based physicians reported using any type of EHR system, up from 34.8% in 2007. In 2012, 39.6% of physicians had an EHR system with features meeting the criteria of a basic system, up from 11.8% in 2007; 23.5% of office-based physicians had an EHR system with features meeting the criteria of a fully functional system in 2012, up from 3.8% in 2007. In 2007, a wide gap existed in use of any type of EHR system between physicians in practices with 11 or more physicians (74.3%) compared with physicians in smaller practices (20.6% among solo practitioners); the gap, however, narrowed during 2007–2012. In 2007, no significant gap was observed in adoption of a fully functional system between primary care (4.7%) and nonprimary care physicians (2.8%); the gap, however, widened over time (27.9% compared with 19.4% in 2012). The difference in adoption of a fully functional system between physicians in practices with 11 or more physicians compared with solo practitioners was 10.4 percentage points in 2007; the gap widened to 30.6 percentage points in 2012.

Regional Variation in Use of Complementary Health Approaches by U.S. Adults

May 20, 2014 Comments off

Regional Variation in Use of Complementary Health Approaches by U.S. Adults
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings
Data from the National Health Interview Survey, 2012

  • Use of nonvitamin, nonmineral dietary supplements (17.9%) was greater than any other complementary health approach used by U.S. adults in 2012.
  • The use of practitioner-based chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation was nearly twice as high in the West North Central region as in the United States overall.
  • Use of nonvitamin, nonmineral dietary supplements was highest in the Mountain, Pacific, and West North Central regions.
  • Use of yoga with deep breathing or meditation was approximately 40% higher in the Pacific and Mountain regions than in the United States overall.

Just Released — Health, United States, 2013

May 15, 2014 Comments off

Health, United States, 2013
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Health, United States presents national trends in health statistics on such topics as birth and death rates, infant mortality, life expectancy, morbidity and health status, risk factors, use of ambulatory and inpatient care, health personnel and facilities, financing of health care, health insurance and managed care, and other health topics.

Trends in Out-of-Hospital Births in the United States, 1990–2012

March 25, 2014 Comments off

Trends in Out-of-Hospital Births in the United States, 1990–2012
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings

  • The percentage of out-of-hospital births increased from 1.26% of U.S. births in 2011 to 1.36% in 2012, continuing an increase that began in 2004.
  • In 2012, out-of-hospital births comprised 2.05% of births to non-Hispanic white women, 0.49% to non-Hispanic black women, 0.46% to Hispanic women, 0.81% to American Indian women, and 0.54% to Asian or Pacific Islander women.
  • In 2012, out-of-hospital births comprised 3%–6% of births in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Washington, and between 2% and 3% of births in Delaware, Indiana, Utah, Vermont, and Wisconsin. Rhode Island (0.33%), Mississippi (0.38%), and Alabama (0.39%) had the lowest percentages of out-of-hospital births.
  • In 2012, the risk profile of out-of-hospital births was lower than for hospital births, with fewer births to teen mothers, and fewer preterm, low birthweight, and multiple births.

Routine Prenatal Care Visits by Provider Specialty in the United States, 2009–2010

March 25, 2014 Comments off

Routine Prenatal Care Visits by Provider Specialty in the United States, 2009–2010
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings
Data from the 2009 and 2010 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

  • At 14.1% of routine prenatal care visits in the United States in 2009–2010, women saw providers whose specialty was not obstetrics and gynecology (ob/gyn).
  • The percentage of routine prenatal care visits that were made to non-ob/gyn providers was highest (20.5%) among women aged 15–19.
  • Visits to non-ob/gyn providers accounted for a higher percentage of routine prenatal care visits among women with Medicaid (24.3%) and women with no insurance (23.1%) compared with women with private insurance (7.3%).
  • The percentage of routine prenatal care visits to non-ob/gyn providers was lower among women in large suburban areas (5.1%) compared with those in urban areas (14.4%) or in small towns or suburbs (22.4%).

Trends in Out-of-Hospital Births in the United States

March 21, 2014 Comments off

Trends in Out-of-Hospital Births in the United States
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings

  • The percentage of out-of-hospital births increased from 1.26% of U.S. births in 2011 to 1.36% in 2012, continuing an increase that began in 2004.
  • In 2012, out-of-hospital births comprised 2.05% of births to non-Hispanic white women, 0.49% to non-Hispanic black women, 0.46% to Hispanic women, 0.81% to American Indian women, and 0.54% to Asian or Pacific Islander women.
  • In 2012, out-of-hospital births comprised 3%–6% of births in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Washington, and between 2% and 3% of births in Delaware, Indiana, Utah, Vermont, and Wisconsin. Rhode Island (0.33%), Mississippi (0.38%), and Alabama (0.39%) had the lowest percentages of out-of-hospital births.
  • In 2012, the risk profile of out-of-hospital births was lower than for hospital births, with fewer births to teen mothers, and fewer preterm, low birthweight, and multiple births.

Primary Cesarean Delivery Rates, by State: Results From the Revised Birth Certificate, 2006–2012

March 6, 2014 Comments off

Primary Cesarean Delivery Rates, by State: Results From the Revised Birth Certificate, 2006–2012 (PDF)
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Objectives
This report describes state-specific trends in pri­ mary cesarean delivery rates from 2006 through 2012 for reporting areas that implemented the 2003 U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth by January 1, 2006, and from 2009 through 2012 for reporting areas that implemented the 2003 revision by January 1, 2009. State-specific changes by gestational age are also explored.

Methods
Data for 2006–2012 are based on 100% of singleton births to residents of the reporting areas that implemented the 2003 birth certificate revision by January 1 of each year. Results are not generalizable to the entire United States—the reporting areas do not represent a random sample of U.S. births.

Results
The primary cesarean delivery rate for the 2006 reporting area (19 states) increased from 21.9% in 2006 to 22.4% in 2009, and then declined to 21.9% in 2012. For the 2009 reporting area (28 states and New York City), the primary cesarean rate declined from 22.1% to 21.5% during 2009–2012. Rates for 16 of 29 areas declined during 2009–2012; the remaining states were unchanged. By gesta­ tional age, state-specific primary cesarean delivery rates at 38 weeks declined for 18 of 29 areas from 2009 to 2012; few state-specific changes were observed at other gestational ages. The primary cesarean delivery rate for the 38 states, District of Columbia, and New York City that were using the revised certificate by January 1, 2012, was 21.5%. State-specific rates ranged from 12.5% (Utah) to 26.9% (Florida and Louisiana).

Financial Burden of Medical Care: A Family Perspective

March 3, 2014 Comments off

Financial Burden of Medical Care: A Family Perspective
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Data from the National Health Interview Survey, 2012

  • In 2012, more than one in four families experienced financial burdens of medical care.
  • Families with incomes at or below 250% of the federal poverty level (FPL) were more likely to experience financial burdens of medical care than families with incomes above 250% of the FPL.
  • Families with children aged 0–17 years were more likely than families without children to experience financial burdens of medical care.
  • The presence of a family member who was uninsured increased the likelihood that a family would experience a financial burden of medical care.

Summary Health Statistics for U.S. Adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2012

February 28, 2014 Comments off

Summary Health Statistics for U.S. Adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2012 (PDF)
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

This report presents detailed tables from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for the civilian noninstitutionalized adult population, classified by sex, age, race and Hispanic origin, education, current employment status, family income, poverty status, health insurance coverage, marital status, and place and region of residence. Estimates (frequencies and percentages) are presented for selected chronic conditions and mental health characteristics, functional limitations, health status, health behaviors, health care access and utilization, and human immunodeficiency virus testing. Percentages and percent distributions are presented in both age-adjusted and unadjusted versions.

Fathers’ Involvement With Their Children: United States, 2006–2010

February 5, 2014 Comments off

Fathers’ Involvement With Their Children: United States, 2006–2010 (PDF)
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Objective
This report measures fathers’ involvement with their children. Father involvement is measured by how often a man participated in a set of activities in the last 4 weeks with children who were living with him and with children who were living apart from him. Involvement is measured separately for children aged 0–4 years and children aged 5–18 years. Increased involvement of fathers in their children’s lives has been associated with a range of positive outcomes for the children.

Methods
The analyses presented in this report are based on a nationally representative sample of 10,403 men aged 15–44 years in the household population of the United States. The father-involvement measures are based on 2,200 fathers of children under age 5—1,790 who live with their children and 410 who live apart from their children, and on 3,166 fathers of children aged 5–18—2,091 who live with their children and 1,075 who live apart from their children.

Results
Statistics are presented on the frequency with which fathers took part in a set of age-specific activities in their children’s lives. Differences in percent distributions are found by whether the father lives with or apart from his children, and by his demographic characteristics. In general, fathers living with their children participated in their children’s lives to a greater degree than fathers who live apart from their children. Differences in fathers’ involvement with their children were also found by the father’s age, marital or cohabiting status, education, and Hispanic origin and race.

Source of Payment for the Delivery: Births in a 33-state and District of Columbia Reporting Area, 2010

January 17, 2014 Comments off

Source of Payment for the Delivery: Births in a 33-state and District of Columbia Reporting Area, 2010 (PDF)
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Private insurance was the most frequent payment source for deliveries in the birth certificate-revised reporting area in 2010 (45.8% of births), followed closely by Medicaid (44.9%), ‘‘other’’ payment sources (5.0%), and self-pay (4.4%). Similarly, NHDS data show that private insurance was the most common payment source for deliveries nationally in 2010, followed by Medicaid. Privately insured deliveries declined over the last decade, while the use of Medicaid insurance increased. Medicaid insurance of deliveries was highest for births to teenagers and for non-Hispanic black and Hispanic mothers, according to the birth certificate data. Privately insured mothers were most likely of all payment groups to receive early prenatal care and to have cesarean deliveries.

Long-Term Care Services in the United States: 2013 Overview

December 16, 2013 Comments off

Long-Term Care Services in the United States: 2013 Overview (PDF)
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Long-term care services include a broad range of services that meet the needs of frail older people and other adults with functional limitations. Long-Term care services provided by paid, regulated providers are a significant component of personal health care spending in the United States. This report presents descriptive results from the first wave of the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers (NSLTCP), which was conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Data presented in this report are drawn from five sources: NCHS surveys of adult day services centers and residential care communities, and administrative records obtained from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services on home health agencies, hospices, and nursing homes. This report provides information on the supply, organizational characteristics, staffing, and services offered by providers of long-term care services; and the demographic, health, and functional composition of users of these services. Service users include residents of nursing homes and residential care communities, patients of home health agencies and hospices, and participants of adult day services centers.

Dementia Special Care Units in Residential Care Communities: United States, 2010

December 2, 2013 Comments off

Dementia Special Care Units in Residential Care Communities: United States, 2010
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings

  • In 2010, 17% of residential care communities had dementia special care units.
  • Beds in dementia special care units accounted for 13% of all residential care beds.
  • Residential care communities with dementia special care units were more likely than those without to have more beds, be chain-affiliated, and be purposely built as a residential care community, and less likely to be certified or registered to participate in Medicaid.
  • Residential care communities with dementia special care units were more likely than those without to be located in the Northeast and in a metropolitan statistical area, and less likely to be in the West.

Self-report of Diabetes and Claims-based Identification of Diabetes Among Medicare Beneficiaries

November 19, 2013 Comments off

Self-report of Diabetes and Claims-based Identification of Diabetes Among Medicare Beneficiaries (PDF)
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Objective— This report compares self-reported diabetes in the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) with diabetes identified using the Medicare Chronic Condition (CC) Summary file.

Background— NHIS records have been linked with Medicare data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The CC Summary file, one of several linked files derived from Medicare claims data, contains indicators for chronic conditions based on an established algorithm.

Methods —This analysis was limited to 2005 NHIS participants aged 65 and over whose records were linked to 2005 Medicare data. Linked NHIS participants had at least 1 month of fee-for-service Medicare coverage in 2005. Concordance between self-reported diabetes and the CC Summary indicator for diabetes is compared and described by demographics, socioeconomic status, health status indicators, and geographic characteristics.

Results— Of the Medicare beneficiaries in the 2005 NHIS, 20.0% self- reported diabetes and 27.8% had an indicator for diabetes in the CC Summary file. Of those who self-reported diabetes in NHIS, the percentage with a CC Summary indicator for diabetes was high (93.1%). Of those with a CC Summary indicator for diabetes, the percentage self-reporting diabetes was comparatively lower (67.0%). Statistically significant differences by subgroup existed in the percentage concordance between the two sources. Of those with self-reported diabetes, the percentage with a CC Summary indicator differed by sex and age. Of those with a CC Summary indicator for diabetes, the percentage with self-reported diabetes differed by age, self-rated health, number of self-reported conditions, and geographic location.

Conclusions— Among Medicare beneficiaries who self-reported diabetes in NHIS, a high concordance was observed with identification of diabetes in the CC Summary file. However, among Medicare beneficiaries with an indicator for diabetes in the CC Summary file, concordance with self-reported diabetes in NHIS is comparatively lower. Differences exist by subgroup.

Hypertension Among Adults in the United States: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011–2012

November 4, 2013 Comments off

Hypertension Among Adults in the United States: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011–2012
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings
Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011–2012

  • The age-adjusted prevalence of hypertension among U.S. adults aged 18 and over was 29.1% in 2011–2012, similar to the prevalence in 2009–2010.
  • The prevalence of hypertension was similar for men and women at nearly one-third. The prevalence increased with age and was highest among older adults; it was also highest among non-Hispanic black adults, at approximately 42%.
  • Among adults with hypertension, nearly 83% were aware, nearly 76% were taking medication to lower their blood pressure, and nearly 52% were controlled. There was no change in awareness, treatment, and control from 2009–2010 to 2011–2012.
  • Controlled hypertension was similar across race and Hispanic origin groups, but the percentage controlled was higher for women and older adults.
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