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Canada’s pay gap

October 30, 2014 Comments off

Canada’s pay gap
Source: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

A new CCPA study, Narrowing the Gap: The difference pubic sector wages make, compares the wages of full-time public and private sector workers and finds significant gaps in the wages of women, aboriginal workers, and visible minority workers. Those gaps are bigger in the private sector in every instance:

  • University educated aboriginal workers make 44% less than their non-aboriginal peers in the private sector. In the public sector, their wage gap shrinks to 14%.
  • University educated women working in the private sector earn 27% less than men. Their wage gap in the public sector is 18%.
  • University educated visible minority workers take home 20% less than their non-visible minority counterparts. In the public sector, their wage gap is 12%.

Salaries are higher in the public sector precisely for those groups of people who experience the greatest discrimination in the private sector—because the public sector goes further in correcting those discriminatory practices. The result is not higher wages but rather a more equitable system of pay.

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Payback Time? What the Internationalization of Climate Litigation Could Mean for Canadian Oil and Gas Companies

October 20, 2014 Comments off

Payback Time? What the Internationalization of Climate Litigation Could Mean for Canadian Oil and Gas Companies
Source: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

This report explores scenarios in which the legal landscape concerning climate damages litigation could suddenly and dramatically change—and finds that Canadian oil and gas companies could be liable for billions of dollars of damages for their contribution to climate change. This study is part of CCPA’s Climate Justice Project and is co-published with West Coast Environmental Law.

All in a Day’s Work? CEO Pay in Canada

January 14, 2014 Comments off

All in a Day’s Work? CEO Pay in Canada
Source: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

Five years after a global recession knocked the wind out of Canada’s labour market, throwing tens of thousands of workers onto the unemployment line and sidelining a generation of young workers, the compensation of Canada’s CEO elite continues to sail along.

This paper takes a snapshot of the 240 publicly listed Canadian corporations on the TSX Index, ranks the highest paid 100 CEOs on that list, and determines their average total compensation.

CETA and Pharmaceuticals: Impact of the trade agreement between Europe and Canada on the costs of patented drugs

November 11, 2013 Comments off

CETA and Pharmaceuticals: Impact of the trade agreement between Europe and Canada on the costs of patented drugs
Source: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

This study finds that the Comprehensive and Economic Trade Agreement (CETA) between the European Union and Canada will further tilt the balance towards the protection of brand-name drug manufacturers and their profits and away from Canadian consumers—resulting in significantly higher drug costs for Canadians. The study also examines the latest revelations about the tentative trade agreement, and asserts that the CETA will seriously impact the ability of Canadians to afford quality health care.

Making the case for postal banking in Canada

October 10, 2013 Comments off

Making the case for postal banking in Canada
Source: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

A new CCPA study finds that the traditional financial banking sector is not meeting the needs of all Canadians. According to the study there are many Canadians in large regions of the country not served by banking institutions, and an estimated 3% to 15% of Canadians do not have a bank account.

The study, by independent researcher John Anderson, suggests that the reintroduction of postal banking in Canada would offer access to financial services not now available to many Canadians. Anderson looks at five successful postal banking models in industrialized countries with relevance to Canadian options and demonstrates how postal banking would succeed in Canada and help improve and stabilize Canada Post’s services and revenues.

CA — Is tuition affordable in your province?

September 17, 2013 Comments off

Is tuition affordable in your province?
Source: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

A new report from the CCPA’s Education Project tracks the affordability of university education across Canadian provinces. The study looks at trends in tuition and compulsory fees in Canada since 1990, projects fees for each province for the next four years, and ranks the provinces on affordability for median- and low-income families using a Cost of Learning Index.

Average tuition and compulsory fees in Canada have tripled since 1990, and according to the study, Ontario is the province with the highest fees and will see its tuition and other fees climb from $8,403 this fall to an estimated $9,517 in 2016-17. Newfoundland and Labrador remains the province with the lowest compulsory fees of $2,872 this fall, rising to an estimated $2,886 in 2016-17.

Canada — Violence against women: the absence of data and a national strategy costs us all

July 18, 2013 Comments off

Violence against women: the absence of data and a national strategy costs us all
Source: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

A study released today, authored by CCPA research associate Kate McInturff, says that progress on ending violence against women in Canada is stalled by the absence of a coherent national policy and consistent information about the levels of that violence. The study estimates the combined cost of adult sexual assault and intimate partner violence is $334 per person per year in Canada—which puts the cost of these crimes on par with the cost of the use of illegal drugs in Canada (an estimated $262 per person) or the cost of smoking (an estimated $541 per person). Federal public spending to address violence against women, on the other hand, amounted to $2.77 per person for the 2011-2012 fiscal year.

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