Archive

Archive for the ‘telecommunications’ Category

UK — Tecmark Survey Finds Average User Picks up their Smartphone 221 Times a Day!

November 20, 2014 Comments off

Tecmark Survey Finds Average User Picks up their Smartphone 221 Times a Day!
Source: Tecmark

Not only do we take to our phones to carry out more than 200 tasks a day, but we start early too! Our research found that the average user reaches for their phone before they’ve even gotten out of bed – checking the weather, picking up emails and seeing if we missed anything on our social channels before we even think about breakfast. And we’re on them late, with the average time at which we last check our phones in a day of 23:21. We amass 3 hours and 16 minutes of time on our phones over the course of the day in total.

Free registration required to download raw data, including gender and regional breakdowns.

About these ads

Wireless Taxation in the United States 2014

November 19, 2014 Comments off

Wireless Taxation in the United States 2014
Source: Tax Foundation

Key Findings

  • Americans pay an average of 17.05 percent in combined federal, state, and local tax and fees on wireless service. This is comprised of a 5.82 percent federal rate and an average 11.23 percent state-local tax rate.
  • The five states with the highest state-local rates are: Washington State (18.6 percent), Nebraska (18.48 percent), New York (17.74 percent), Florida (16.55 percent), and Illinois (15.81 percent).
  • The five states with the lowest state-local rates are: Oregon (1.76 percent), Nevada (1.86 percent), Idaho (2.62 percent), Montana (6.00 percent), and West Virginia (6.15 percent).
  • Four cities—Chicago, Baltimore, Omaha, and New York City—have effective tax rates in excess of 25 percent of the customer bill.
  • The average rates of taxes and fees on wireless telephone services are more than two times higher than the average sales tax rates that apply to most other taxable goods and services.
  • Excessive taxes on wireless consumers disproportionately impacts poorer families.

The Cost of an Internet Access Tax

November 6, 2014 Comments off

The Cost of an Internet Access Tax
Source: American Action Forum

A ban on Internet access taxes has sailed through the House and is awaiting Senate action before the end of session. The Permanent Internet Tax Freedom Act is a permanent extension of the Internet Tax Freedom Act (ITFA), which was passed in 1998 to prevent local and state governments from taxing consumers for Internet access or levying Internet-specific taxes. By our estimates, letting the Internet Tax Freedom Act sunset could cost consumers $14.7 billion a year in taxes if Internet access were subject to the countless taxes of wireless service. With businesses and families already feeling the brunt of the high taxes and a slow recovery, a new tax could hurt this dynamic part of the economy.

With a sunset of ITFA coming in mid-December, some have tried to rope this must-pass bill with the more contentious issue of Internet sales tax. However, taxation of Internet access should be judged on its own merits, separate from the broader issue of taxation on goods sold over the Internet.

Smartphone Data Encryption: A Renewed Boundary for Law Enforcement?, CRS Insights (October 17, 2014)

November 6, 2014 Comments off

Smartphone Data Encryption: A Renewed Boundary for Law Enforcement?, CRS Insights (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

Modern-day criminals constantly develop new techniques to facilitate their illicit activities. They have adapted to cross, circumvent, and exploit a number of boundaries—including geographic borders, law enforcement jurisdiction, turf, and cyberspace—which simultaneously present obstacles for the officials tasked with combatting these malicious actors.

CRS — Deploying 5G (Fifth Generation) Wireless Technology: Is the United States on Track?, CRS Insights (October 21, 2014)

November 6, 2014 Comments off

Deploying 5G (Fifth Generation) Wireless Technology: Is the United States on Track?, CRS Insights (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

In 2018, when the XXIII Winter Olympic Games begin in PyeongChang, South Korea, the global competition for leadership of the mobile communications industry might be intensified by the introduction of a prototype 5G network. Commercial deployments of fifth-generation technologies by 2020 have been announced by wireless network officials in South Korea and Japan. In July 2014, Ericsson, a global leader in communications technology, demonstrated the speed of its 5G network design to customers NTT DOCOMO (Japan) and SK Telecom (South Korea). The technological advances of these early roll-outs might leapfrog the technologies used by U.S. networks, eroding what is widely perceived as a American competitive advantage in mobile communications.

Spectrum Needs of Self-Driving Vehicles, CRS Insights (October 28, 2014)

November 5, 2014 Comments off

Spectrum Needs of Self-Driving Vehicles, CRS Insights (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

Baby you can drive my car (unless it drives itself). Among the technologies that are emerging from laboratory environments to test their wings in the real world, the self-driving vehicle is a noticeable standout. Autonomous vehicles is a class of communications and decision-making technologies that are part of what some describe as the Industrial Internet—the integration of complex machinery with networked software and sensors. By 2020, there are likely to be 50 billion devices in this category— which includes the more familiar Internet of Things. Many of the devices will require wireless communications and converge with commercial rollout of the next generation of communications technologies (fifth-generation, or 5G). Identifying radio frequency spectrum for multiple technologies, uses, and users in a fifth-generation communications environment will likely become a significant policy issue, as demonstrated by the current debate about access to the 5.9 GHz band for vehicle communications for crash avoidance. Bills that address some of the issues raised in the debate have been introduced by Senator Rubio (S. 2505) and Representative Latta (H.R. 5125).

Cell Phones, Social Media and Campaign 2014

November 4, 2014 Comments off

Cell Phones, Social Media and Campaign 2014
Source: Pew Research Internet Project

Cell phones and social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter are playing an increasingly prominent role in how voters get political information and follow election news, according to a new national survey by the Pew Research Center.

The proportion of Americans who use their cell phones to track political news or campaign coverage has doubled compared with the most recent midterm election: 28% of registered voters have used their cell phone in this way during the 2014 campaign, up from 13% in 2010. Further, the number of Americans who follow candidates or other political figures on social media has also risen sharply: 16% of registered voters now do this, up from 6% in 2010.

Voters of all ages are more likely to take part in these behaviors than in the previous midterm race, but that growth has been especially pronounced among 30-49 year olds. Some 40% of voters ages 30-49 have used their cell phone to follow this year’s election campaign (up from 15% in 2010) and 21% follow political figures on social media (up from just 6% in 2010). Voters in this age group now take part in each of these behaviors at rates nearly identical to 18-29 year olds.

Participation in the digital campaign does not have a clear partisan slant. Republicans and Democrats engage in each of these behaviors at similar rates. At the same time, when asked about some reasons why they might follow political figures on social media, Republicans and Republican-leaning independents express a greater desire to be the first to find out about breaking political news, and to say that they use social media to get political information that has not passed through the traditional media “filter.” Voters from both parties place a similar emphasis on the deeper connections that social media allows them to form with the candidates they support.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 961 other followers