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Mapping the European ICT Poles of Excellence: The Atlas of ICT Activity in Europe

April 18, 2014 Comments off

Mapping the European ICT Poles of Excellence: The Atlas of ICT Activity in Europe
Source: European Commission

The EIPE Atlas presents the results of the empirical mapping of ICT activity in Europe and the ranking of the top European NUTS 3 regions based on their performance in EIPE Composite Indicator (EIPE CI), together with the ranks for the individual 42 indicators which contributed to the building of the EIPE composite indicators. The report offers a snapshot of the performance of regions that are identified as the main locations of ICT activity in Europe. It is meant to provide a comprehensive picture of how ICT activity is distributed across Europe and where its main locations are. This information is expected to give a better overview of the European ICT landscape, activity and actors in each location and to reveal their strengths and weaknesses.

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The Financial Security Scorecard: A State-by-State Analysis of Economic Pressures Facing Future Retirees

April 18, 2014 Comments off

The Financial Security Scorecard: A State-by-State Analysis of Economic Pressures Facing Future Retirees (PDF)
Source: National Institute on Retirement Security
From press release:

A new analysis finds that nearly every state falls short in key areas that measure retirement readiness. The Financial Security Scorecard: A State-by-State Analysis of Economic Pressures Facing Future Retirees gauges the relative performance of the fifty states and the District of Columbia in three key areas: anticipated retirement income; major retirement costs like housing and healthcare; and labor market conditions for older workers.

The study is designed to serve as a tool for policymakers to help identify potential areas of focus for state-based policy interventions to improve Americans’ retirement prospects.

The Five Most Costly Children’s Conditions, 2011: Estimates for U.S. Civilian Noninstitutionalized Children, Ages 0-17

April 17, 2014 Comments off

The Five Most Costly Children’s Conditions, 2011: Estimates for U.S. Civilian Noninstitutionalized Children, Ages 0-17
Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

This Statistical Brief presents data from the Household Component of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS-HC) regarding medical expenditures associated with the top five most costly conditions for children in 2011. These top five conditions–mental disorders; asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); trauma-related disorders; acute bronchitis and upper respiratory infections (URI); and otitis media (ear infections)–were determined by totaling and ranking the expenses for all medical care delivered in 2011.

Social Host Liability for Underage Drinking Statutes

April 16, 2014 Comments off

Social Host Liability for Underage Drinking Statutes
Source: National Conference of State Legislatures

Enacted in 1984, the National Minimum Drinking Age Act set the minimum drinking age at 21. To comply with federal law, states prohibit persons under 21 years of age from purchasing or publicly possessing alcoholic beverages.

According to the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, about 9.3 million persons aged 12 to 20 (24.3 percent of this age group) reported drinking alcohol in the past month and an estimated 11.2 percent of persons aged 12 or older drove under the influence of alcohol at least once in the past year.

In an effort to combat underage drinking, state legislators have enacted laws that assign responsibility to adults who allow minors to drink alcohol at social gatherings. Thirty-one states allow social hosts to be civilly liable for injuries or damages caused by underage drinkers. Twenty-six states and the Virgin Islands have criminal penalties for adults who host or permit parties with underage drinking to occur in the adults’ homes or in premises under the adults’ control. These social host statutory provisions do not apply to licensed establishments such as restaurants, bars, and liquor stores, which are covered by dram shop laws.

Who Pays Taxes in America in 2014?

April 16, 2014 Comments off

Who Pays Taxes in America in 2014?
Source: Citizens for Tax Justice

All Americans pay taxes. Everyone who works pays federal payroll taxes. Everyone who buys gasoline pays federal and state gas taxes. Everyone who owns or rents a home directly or indirectly pays property taxes. Anyone who shops pays sales taxes in most states.

The nation’s tax system is barely progressive. Those who argue that the wealthy are overtaxed focus solely on the federal personal income tax, while ignoring the other taxes that Americans pay. But, as the table to the right illustrates, the total share of taxes (federal, state, and local) that will be paid by Americans across the economic spectrum in 2014 is roughly equal to their total share of income.

Many taxes are regressive, meaning they take a larger share of income from poor and middle-income families than they do from the rich. To offset the regressive impact of payroll taxes, sales taxes and even some state and local income taxes, we need federal income tax policies that are more progressive.

Health Care — Report Card on State Price Transparency Laws

April 16, 2014 Comments off

Report Card on State Price Transparency Laws (PDF)
Source: Catalyst for Payment Reform and Health Care Incentives Improvement Institute

Some states have robust price transparency laws and regulations, requiring them to create a publicly available website with price information based on real paid claims information; but in reality, the public can’t readily access that information because the website is poorly designed, or poorly functioning. Given that so many state-mandated websites are inadequate, once we included websites into our review and grading, no state received an “A” in this year’s Report Card. Unfortunately, New Hampshire—a state that received an A in last year’s Report Card—dropped to an F this year, because its website is inoperative and may remain so for an extended period.

Several states have “voluntary price transparency websites,” hosted by hospital associations, foundations, or nonprofits. While these sites can be a valuable resource to consumers, if they are not legislated they can be short-lived, dependent on the good will and resources of the organization that hosts them. For this reason, we did not factor in these websites when awarding the 2014 state grades; however, we did provide a review of them in Appendix I for comparison purposes.

Citations of Most Often Cited Economists: Do Scholarly Books Matter More than Quality Journals?

April 16, 2014 Comments off

Citations of Most Often Cited Economists: Do Scholarly Books Matter More than Quality Journals? (PDF)
Source: Pacific Economic Review

This paper empirically investigates the determinants of citations based on the publication of the top 100 most often cited economists. The effects of publication age and author fame on subsequent citations are found to be positive and significant. Citations are also significantly affected by popular subfields in economics. However, journal quality measures, such as impact factors, download statistics and top-4 elite journals, have insignificant effects on citations. In contrast, the citation effect of scholarly books is positive and significant, and its impact is even greater than those of journal quality measures.

Taxation — Facts & Figures 2014: How Does Your State Compare?

April 16, 2014 Comments off

Facts & Figures 2014: How Does Your State Compare?
Source: Tax Foundation

This morning, the Tax Foundation released the 2014 edition of Facts & Figures: How Does Your State Compare? Just in time for tax season, the latest edition of this popular pocket-sized handbook contains the rates and rankings of all 50 states on 39 different measures of tax and fiscal policy.

Topics include information on tax measures (such as revenue per capita, federal aid to states, and State Business Tax Climate Index rankings), individual income taxes, corporate income taxes, general sales taxes, excise taxes, property taxes, state debt, and population data. For a full list of all measures included in this year’s edition, click here.

Tech Trade in the States: A State by State Overview of International Trade in Tech Goods

April 14, 2014 Comments off

Tech Trade in the States: A State by State Overview of International Trade in Tech Goods (PDF)
Source: Tech America Foundation

TechAmerica Foundation proudly presents our 2014 edition of Tech Trade in the States: A State-by-State Overview of International Trade of Tech Goods. It provides 2012 data on tech trade at the national level and export data for all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The report also provides an estimate as to the number of jobs that are supported by export activities.

Maps: Tax Indicators in Your County

April 11, 2014 Comments off

Maps: Tax Indicators in Your County
Source: Brookings Institution

Tax season is winding down, and many of us are scrambling to submit our returns to the IRS this week. But do you know how your tax return compares to others from around the country?

Earlier this year, Brookings released a series of interactive tax maps that break down major taxes and credits by individual U.S. county.

New State-by-State Analysis: 32 Million Were Underinsured in 2012, Including 4 Million Middle-Income People; Nearly 80 Million in Total Lacked Health Insurance or Were Underinsured, Ranging from 14 Percent in Massachusetts to 38 Percent in New Mexico and Texas

April 11, 2014 Comments off

New State-by-State Analysis: 32 Million Were Underinsured in 2012, Including 4 Million Middle-Income People; Nearly 80 Million in Total Lacked Health Insurance or Were Underinsured, Ranging from 14 Percent in Massachusetts to 38 Percent in New Mexico and Texas
Source: Commonwealth Fund

Thirty-two million people under age 65 were underinsured in the U.S. in 2012, meaning they had health coverage but it provided inadequate protection against high health care costs relative to their income, a new Commonwealth Fund report finds. The first report to examine the underinsured at the state level, it finds that the rate of underinsured ranged from a low of 8 percent in New Hampshire to highs of 16 percent in Mississippi and Tennessee and 17 percent in Idaho and Utah.

Low- and middle-income families were most likely to be affected: 13 percent—4 million—of the underinsured were middle-income, earning between about $47,000 and $95,000 for a family of four, and 81 percent—26 million—were low-income, earning less than 200 percent of the federal poverty level, or under $47,000 a year for a family of four.

In addition, 47 million people were uninsured in 2012—a decline of nearly 2 million from 2010, likely due in large part to the Affordable Care Act’s early provision to expand dependent coverage for young adults.

Before the major expansions of the ACA began to be implemented this year, a total of 79 million people under 65 were uninsured or underinsured, and therefore at risk for not being able to afford needed health care or for facing debt from medical bills in 2012. Nationally, nearly one of three (29%) people were uninsured or underinsured, ranging from 14 percent in Massachusetts to 36 to 38 percent in Florida, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, and Texas.

The Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion and health insurance reforms are appropriately targeted to those Americans who are most likely to be unable to afford insurance or needed health care, according to the report, America’s Underinsured: A State-by-State Look at Health Insurance Affordability Prior to the New Coverage Expansions. Based on their incomes alone, 20 million of the underinsured in 2012, as well as 24 million of the uninsured, would qualify for Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.

However, millions who are poor will not have any new coverage options. In states choosing not to expand Medicaid, more than 15 million underinsured and uninsured people have incomes below poverty—earning less than $23,550 a year for a family of four

Financial Burden of Medical Spending by State and the Implications of the 2014 Medicaid Expansions

April 10, 2014 Comments off

Financial Burden of Medical Spending by State and the Implications of the 2014 Medicaid Expansions
Source: Urban Institute

This study is the first to offer a detailed look at medical spending burden levels, defined as total family medical out-of-pocket spending as a proportion of income, for each state. It further investigates which states have greater shares of individuals with high burden levels and no Medicaid coverage, but would be Medicaid eligible under the 2014 rules of the Affordable Care Act should their state choose to participate in the expansion. This work suggests which states have the largest populations likely to benefit, in terms of lowering medical spending burden, from participating in the 2014 adult Medicaid expansions.

Tax Freedom Day® Arrives on April 21, 2014

April 10, 2014 Comments off

Tax Freedom Day® Arrives on April 21, 2014
Source: Tax Foundation

Tax Freedom Day, the day on which American’s have collectively earned enough income to pay off the total federal, state, and local tax bill, will arrive 111 days into the year on April 21, according to the annual report released this morning by the nonpartisan Tax Foundation.

While the national date arrives 6 days after the deadline for filing taxes, each state’s total federal, state, and local tax burden varies greatly. Louisiana’s Tax Freedom Day is the earliest and arrives on March 30, and is followed by Mississippi (Apr 2) and South Dakota (Apr 4). New Jersey and Connecticut are tied with the latest date on May 9 and they are preceded by New York (May 4).

The study’s key findings include:

  • Tax Freedom Day is three days later than last year due mainly to the continuing economic recovery, which will boost federal tax revenue collected through the corporate, payroll, and individual income tax.
  • Americans will spend more on taxes in 2014 than they will on food, clothing, and housing combined.
  • Americans will spend 42 days working to pay off income taxes, 15 days for excise taxes, and 11 days for property taxes. Click here for a full breakdown.
  • Americans will pay $3 trillion in federal taxes and $1.5 trillion in state and local taxes, for a total bill of more than $4.5 trillion, or 30.2 percent of the nation’s income.
  • If you include annual federal borrowing, which represents future taxes owed, Tax Freedom Day would occur on May 6, 15 days later.

See also: Tax Foundation Figures Do Not Represent Typical Households’ Tax Burdens (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities)

2013 Global Go To Think Tank Index Report

April 10, 2014 Comments off

2013 Global Go To Think Tank Index Report
Source: Think Tanks and Civil Societies Program (University of Pennsylvania)

The Think Tanks and Civil Societies Program (TTCSP) at the University of Pennsylvania released its seventh annual 2013 Global Go To Think Tanks Report on Wednesday January 22, 2014, at a morning press conference in Washington DC, hosted by the World Bank. The 2013 Global Go To Think Tank Index (GGTTI) marks the seventh year of continued efforts by the Think Tanks and Civil Societies Program at the University of Pennsylvania (TTCSP) to acknowledge the important contributions and emerging global trends of think tanks worldwide. Our initial effort to generate a ranking of the world’s leading think tanks in 2006 was a response to a series of requests from donors, government officials, journalists, and scholars, to produce regional and international rankings of the world’s preeminent think tanks. Since its inception, our ongoing objective for the GGTTI report is to gain understanding of the role think tanks play in governments and civil societies. Using this knowledge, we hope to assist in improving the capacity and performance of think tanks around the world.

State Fire Death Rates and Relative Risk

April 9, 2014 Comments off

State Fire Death Rates and Relative Risk
Source: U.S. Fire Administration

The fire problem varies from region to region in the United States. This often is a result of climate, poverty, education, demographics, and other causal factors. Perhaps the most useful way to assess fire fatalities across groups is to determine the relative risk of dying in a fire. Relative risk compares the per capita rate for a particular group (e.g., Pennsylvania) to the overall per capita rate (i.e., the general population). The result is a measure of how likely a group is to be affected. For the general population, the relative risk is set at 1.

In addition to the District of Columbia, the states with the highest relative risk in 2010 included West Virginia, Alabama and Mississippi. The populace of West Virginia was 3.3 times more likely to die in a fire than the general population; however, people living in Oregon, Massachusetts and Arizona were 50 percent less likely to die in a fire than the population as a whole. Twenty-three states and the District of Columbia had a relative risk higher than that of the general population. Three states, Iowa, Washington and New Mexico, had a relative risk comparable to that of the general population.

Relative risk was not computed for HI, ME, ND, VT and WY due to small numbers of fire deaths which are subject to variability.

Illinois Residents Least Trusting of Their State Government

April 9, 2014 Comments off

Illinois Residents Least Trusting of Their State Government
Source: Gallup

Illinois residents trust their state government to handle their state’s problems far less than residents in any other state. Twenty-eight percent of Illinois residents trust their state government “a great deal” or “a fair amount.” In contrast, at least 75% of North Dakota, Wyoming, and Utah residents trust their state governments.

5 Tech Trends to Watch 2014

April 9, 2014 Comments off

5 Tech Trends to Watch 2014 (PDF)
Source: Consumer Electronics Association

Technology has the power to transform lives – our products and services educate, entertain and connect consumers. To identify some of the technologies poised to improve our world, the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA)® created Five Technology Trends to Watch. This annual publication looks at five areas that promise to have a dramatic impact on the $203 billion consumer electronics (CE) industry.

In the 2014 issue, using the latest consumer research and market forecasts, CEA looks at the Internet of Things (IoT), driverless cars, digital health care, robotics and content curation. Each of these advances holds the potential to enrich our lives, and in some cases, massively change them.

Occupational Employment and Wages — May 2013 (released 4/1/14)

April 9, 2014 Comments off

Occupational Employment and Wages — May 2013
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Retail salespersons and cashiers were the occupations with the largest employment in May 2013, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. These two occupations combined made up nearly 6 percent of total U.S. employment, with employment levels of 4.5 million and 3.3 million, respectively. National employment and wage information for all occupations is shown in table 1.

The data in this release are from the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) program, which provides employment and wage estimates by area and by industry for wage and salary workers in 22 major occupational groups, 94 minor occupational groups, 458 broad occupations, and 821 detailed occupations.

Competitive Alternatives: KPMG’s Guide to International Business Location Costs

April 9, 2014 Comments off

Competitive Alternatives: KPMG’s Guide to International Business Location Costs
Source: KPMG

Competitive Alternatives is a biennial KPMG study that focuses on business locations in the NAFTA marketplace, as well as leading mature market countries in Europe and Asia Pacific. This study contains valuable information for any company considering international business location options.

Competitive Alternatives 2014 compares business costs and other competitiveness factors in more than 100 cities, in 10 countries: Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States. For 2014, Competitive Alternatives further expands its coverage in the US, and for the first time includes every US metro area with a population of two million or more.

Pew Index Shows 40 States Improved Election Performance in 2012

April 8, 2014 Comments off

Pew Index Shows 40 States Improved Election Performance in 2012
Source: Pew Charitable Trusts

Between 2008 and 2012, state election performance overall improved by 4.4 percentage points, according to The Pew Charitable Trusts’ latest Elections Performance Index, released today. The expanded index makes it possible for all 50 states and the District of Columbia to measure how well they conducted elections compared not only with other states, but also over time.

This annual study allows states to measure election administration by looking at such indicators as wait times at polling locations, availability of voting information tools online, rejection of voter registrations, problems with registration or absentee ballots, rejection of military and overseas ballots, voter turnout, and accuracy of voting technology.

Overall, 40 states and the district improved their scores in the 2012 election, compared with 2008. The scores of 21 states and the district rose at a rate greater than the national average, 19 states’ averages improved but didn’t keep pace with the national average, and 10 states’ performance declined. The district improved the most—20 points—from 2008 to 2012 but still remained among the lower performers.

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