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Harnessing Immigrant Small Entrepreneurship for Economic Growth

April 28, 2015 Comments off

Harnessing Immigrant Small Entrepreneurship for Economic Growth (PDF)
Source: Bread for the World Institute

Immigrant-owned small businesses generate $776 billion in business activity and sustain 4.7 million employees—14 percent of all workers employed by U.S. small business owners. While 13 percent of the U.S. population was born outside the United States, 18 percent of small business owners are foreign-born. But there are few specific policies at the national or local levels supporting the potential of immigrant small entrepreneurs to reduce poverty and spur economic growth.

This report identifies challenges for small immigrant entrepreneurs and promising practices to better support them in three case study sites: Miami, Florida; Des Moines, Iowa; and Salt Lake City, Utah.

President Obama’s November 2014 executive action granting deferred deportation and work permits to millions of unauthorized immigrants offers a unique opportunity to expand the power of immigrant small entrepreneurship to boost local economic growth. But to realize this potential, immigrants need better access to finance, culturally relevant business training, and a path to permanent legalization.

Fact Sheet: Hunger and mass incarceration

April 27, 2015 Comments off

Fact Sheet: Hunger and mass incarceration (PDF)
Source: Bread for the World Institute

People in prison are more likely to have struggled with hunger and poverty before entering prison. This puts them at high risk for returning to conditions of hunger and poverty after prison.

Hunger by the numbers in the African-American community

February 25, 2015 Comments off

Hunger by the numbers in the African-American community (PDF)
Source: Bread for the World Institute

In the United States, over 42 million people identify as African-American or black—13.6 percent of the U.S. population. Last year, poverty and hunger declined for the first time since the start of the recession.

Last year’s decline in poverty and hunger mirrors the decrease in unemployment that also occurred. Bread for the World believes that the best pathway out of hunger and poverty is a good job. African-Americans continue to suffer from disproportionately higher unemployment rates than the general U.S. population as well as any other major group despite the economic gains of the past few years.

Ending Child Hunger in the United States

January 16, 2015 Comments off

Ending Child Hunger in the United States (PDF)
Source: Bread for the World Institute

In 2013, 15.8 million U.S. children were at risk of hunger. For children, even brief periods of hunger carry consequences that may last a lifetime. Many children suffer from nutritional deficiencies, sometimes referred to as “hidden hunger” since they can cause serious health problems in children who don’t “look hungry.” Nutrition affects mental health and academic achievement as well as physical health. But the damage caused by food insecurity is unnecessary and preventable. Federal nutrition programs help millions of children eat well; these programs must be maintained and strengthened to provide more eligible children with healthier food. When Congress reauthorizes child nutrition programs in 2015, the emphasis must be on enabling programs to serve all eligible children well—from WIC for infants, to meals at daycare for preschoolers, to school lunch, breakfast, and summer food for elementary and secondary students. The United States simply cannot afford the consequences of allowing children to go without the nutritious food they need. Strong child nutrition programs must be a top national priority.

Hunger and Poverty among Hispanics — Fact Sheet

January 15, 2015 Comments off

Hunger and Poverty among Hispanics — Fact Sheet (PDF)
Source: Bread for the World Institute

As millions of Americans begin to climb out of the deep hole the recession created, the federal government has to focus on further reducing unemployment as well as income inequality. Communities of color tend to suffer disproportionately from unemployment and low wages, thus experiencing higher levels of poverty and hunger. Hispanics are the largest ethnic minority group in the United States, both in native-born and foreign-born populations. However, Hispanics, as with the general population, are starting to see reductions of hunger and poverty due to a decrease in unemployment.

Spanish version also available.

2015 Hunger Report: When Women Flourish…We Can End Hunger

December 9, 2014 Comments off

2015 Hunger Report: When Women Flourish…We Can End Hunger
Source: Bread for the World Institute
From press release:

The 2015 Hunger Report, When Women Flourish…We Can End Hunger, released today by Bread for the World Institute, identifies the empowerment of women and girls as essential in ending hunger, extreme poverty, and malnutrition around the world and in the United States.

The 2015 Hunger Report comes at a time when the 114th Congress, which starts in January, will have 100 women legislators – the most ever in U.S. history. Despite the fact that fully 22 percent of the world’s legislators are female, women face barriers that limit their ability to engage fully in economic activity. Women are also more likely to earn less or work in low-wage jobs.

The report also shows that women’s willingness to share men’s breadwinning responsibilities has not been matched by men’s willingness to share unpaid household work or caregiving responsibilities. Though domestic work is a public good in the same way that education, clean water, clean air, and the food supply are, it is not recognized as such. Women constitute half the global population.

The war on poverty at 50: significant progress made, but renewed dedication needed

October 7, 2014 Comments off

The war on poverty at 50: significant progress made, but renewed dedication needed
Source: Bread for the World Institute

The United States cut poverty in half during the late 1960s and the 1970s. However, progress stalled in the 1980s as the issue of poverty moved further down the priority list for members of Congress and the president. Despite the advancements made since 1964, poverty is still far too high in the United States.
• 46.5 million Americans live in poverty.
• More than one in five children live in poverty.
• 49 million people, including one in six children, live in homes that struggle to put food on the table.
• A parent working full-time at minimum wage earns about $14,500 a year—$4,000 below the poverty line for a family of three.

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