Archive

Archive for the ‘Bread for the World Institute’ Category

Ending Child Hunger in the United States

January 16, 2015 Comments off

Ending Child Hunger in the United States (PDF)
Source: Bread for the World Institute

In 2013, 15.8 million U.S. children were at risk of hunger. For children, even brief periods of hunger carry consequences that may last a lifetime. Many children suffer from nutritional deficiencies, sometimes referred to as “hidden hunger” since they can cause serious health problems in children who don’t “look hungry.” Nutrition affects mental health and academic achievement as well as physical health. But the damage caused by food insecurity is unnecessary and preventable. Federal nutrition programs help millions of children eat well; these programs must be maintained and strengthened to provide more eligible children with healthier food. When Congress reauthorizes child nutrition programs in 2015, the emphasis must be on enabling programs to serve all eligible children well—from WIC for infants, to meals at daycare for preschoolers, to school lunch, breakfast, and summer food for elementary and secondary students. The United States simply cannot afford the consequences of allowing children to go without the nutritious food they need. Strong child nutrition programs must be a top national priority.

Hunger and Poverty among Hispanics — Fact Sheet

January 15, 2015 Comments off

Hunger and Poverty among Hispanics — Fact Sheet (PDF)
Source: Bread for the World Institute

As millions of Americans begin to climb out of the deep hole the recession created, the federal government has to focus on further reducing unemployment as well as income inequality. Communities of color tend to suffer disproportionately from unemployment and low wages, thus experiencing higher levels of poverty and hunger. Hispanics are the largest ethnic minority group in the United States, both in native-born and foreign-born populations. However, Hispanics, as with the general population, are starting to see reductions of hunger and poverty due to a decrease in unemployment.

Spanish version also available.

2015 Hunger Report: When Women Flourish…We Can End Hunger

December 9, 2014 Comments off

2015 Hunger Report: When Women Flourish…We Can End Hunger
Source: Bread for the World Institute
From press release:

The 2015 Hunger Report, When Women Flourish…We Can End Hunger, released today by Bread for the World Institute, identifies the empowerment of women and girls as essential in ending hunger, extreme poverty, and malnutrition around the world and in the United States.

The 2015 Hunger Report comes at a time when the 114th Congress, which starts in January, will have 100 women legislators – the most ever in U.S. history. Despite the fact that fully 22 percent of the world’s legislators are female, women face barriers that limit their ability to engage fully in economic activity. Women are also more likely to earn less or work in low-wage jobs.

The report also shows that women’s willingness to share men’s breadwinning responsibilities has not been matched by men’s willingness to share unpaid household work or caregiving responsibilities. Though domestic work is a public good in the same way that education, clean water, clean air, and the food supply are, it is not recognized as such. Women constitute half the global population.

The war on poverty at 50: significant progress made, but renewed dedication needed

October 7, 2014 Comments off

The war on poverty at 50: significant progress made, but renewed dedication needed
Source: Bread for the World Institute

The United States cut poverty in half during the late 1960s and the 1970s. However, progress stalled in the 1980s as the issue of poverty moved further down the priority list for members of Congress and the president. Despite the advancements made since 1964, poverty is still far too high in the United States.
• 46.5 million Americans live in poverty.
• More than one in five children live in poverty.
• 49 million people, including one in six children, live in homes that struggle to put food on the table.
• A parent working full-time at minimum wage earns about $14,500 a year—$4,000 below the poverty line for a family of three.

U.S. Food Aid Reform Fact Sheet

September 18, 2014 Comments off

U.S. Food Aid Reform Fact Sheet (PDF)
Source: Bread for the World Institute

The United States has long been a global leader in responding to humanitarian emergencies and is the largest provider of lifesaving food aid in the world. Since Food for Peace—the largest U.S. food-aid program–began in 1954, approximately 3 billion people in 150 countries have benefitted from American generosity and compassion. However, as this crucial program has been scrutinized in recent years, clear inefficiencies in how it is operated have emerged. With recent constraints on federal spending, we must seize this opportunity to reform this valuable program so that appropriated funds are used as effectively as possible to reach the maximum number of hungry people overseas, especially malnourished women and children.

Elections Matter 2014

August 12, 2014 Comments off

Elections Matter 2014
Source: Bread for the World Institute
From website:

The elections in 2014 (congressional) and 2016 (congressional and presidential) are vitally important to Bread for the World.

Bread wants to help end hunger by 2030, and to do that, it needs to help build the political will to make hunger a national priority by 2017.

Starting with this year’s elections, Bread hopes it can get a Congress and new president who are behind these goals.

This summer and fall, during the campaigns leading up to the 2014 mid-term congressional elections, Bread is asking its members all over the country to engage all candidates on hunger and poverty issues.

Why Children are Fleeing Central America

July 31, 2014 Comments off

Why Children are Fleeing Central America (PDF)
Source: Bread for the World Institute

Since last October, more than 52,000 unaccompanied children have fled unspeakable conditions and crossed into the United States. Most have come from Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador. By year’s end, that number is expected to grow to between 70,000 and 90,000. The Department of Homeland Security is preparing for more than 100,000 children to arrive in 2015. The United States is witnessing a humanitarian crisis in this situation.

Many members of Congress are focusing on detention centers and how fast the United States can send these children back to their home countries. Few are asking this question: What are we sending these children back to? Without addressing the root causes of this crisis, such as poverty and violence, this situation will continue. More and more children will be driven to flee their home countries in search of greater educational and economic opportunities, safer and more stable communities, and a path out of hunger.

This crisis is not just about the surge of new arrivals in the United States. It is also about the conditions of poverty, hunger, and violence that force children to leave their homes on a very dangerous and uncertain journey:

• 75 percent of these children are coming from three countries: Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras.
• More than half of the citizens of Honduras and Guatemala live on less than $4 a day.
• About half of all Guatemalans suffer from moderately or severely stunted growth.
• Honduras has the highest murder rate per capita in the world. It is almost five times that of Mexico and twice that of Detroit.
• Residents of all ages, including children, in these countries are getting caught in gang-related violence.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 999 other followers