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Vital Signs: Hispanic Health

May 14, 2015 Comments off

Vital Signs: Hispanic Health
Source: CDC

Hispanics or Latinos are the largest racial/ethnic minority population in the US. Heart disease and cancer in Hispanics are the two leading causes of death, accounting for about 2 of 5 deaths, which is about the same for whites. Hispanics have lower deaths than whites from most of the 10 leading causes of death with three exceptions—more deaths from diabetes and chronic liver disease, and similar numbers of deaths from kidney diseases. Health risk can vary by Hispanic subgroup—for example, 66% more Puerto Ricans smoke than Mexicans. Health risk also depends partly on whether you were born in the US or another country. Hispanics are almost 3 times as likely to be uninsured as whites. Hispanics in the US are on average nearly 15 years younger than whites, so steps Hispanics take now to prevent disease can go a long way.

Stressful Life Events Experienced by Women in the Year Before Their Infants’ Births — United States, 2000–2010

May 4, 2015 Comments off

Stressful Life Events Experienced by Women in the Year Before Their Infants’ Births — United States, 2000–2010
Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (CDC)

Epidemiologic studies suggest that prenatal stress is associated with preterm birth, low birth weight (1–3), and peripartum anxiety and depressive symptoms (4). The most recent population-based study, assessing trends in stress experienced in the year before an infant’s birth, used 1990–1995 data from 11 states participating in the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) (5). That study found that 64% of women surveyed reported experiencing at least one stressful life event (SLE), although the prevalence declined slightly over the study period. PRAMS data for 2000–2010 were used to examine more recent trends and to determine if the prevalence of SLEs has continued to decrease in the past decade. Additionally, 2010 data were used to determine the extent that maternal demographics and state of residence are associated with SLEs. This report describes the results of those analyses, which found that most women in the sample reported experiencing ≥1 SLEs in the year before their infant’s birth, although the prevalence of experiencing SLEs decreased during 2000–2010. In 2010, based on data from 27 states, 70.2% of women reported ≥1 SLEs. The mean number of SLEs was 1.81, ranging from 1.41 in New York City to 2.26 in Oklahoma. SLEs were most frequently financial. Prevalence of SLEs varied by PRAMS reporting site and maternal demographics. Younger, less educated, unmarried, and Medicaid-covered women had the highest prevalence of SLEs. Public health practitioners and clinicians can use the information on trends and risk factors for SLEs to determine the likelihood that pregnant women might benefit from screening for stressors during pregnancy.

Drug-poisoning Deaths Involving Heroin: United States, 2000–2013

April 23, 2015 Comments off

Drug-poisoning Deaths Involving Heroin: United States, 2000–2013
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings
Data from the National Vital Statistics System (Mortality)

  • From 2000 through 2013, the age-adjusted rate for drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin nearly quadrupled from 0.7 deaths per 100,000 in 2000 to 2.7 deaths per 100,000 in 2013. Most of the increase occurred after 2010.
  • The number of drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin was nearly four times higher for men (6,525 deaths) than women (1,732 deaths) in 2013.
  • In 2000, non-Hispanic black persons aged 45–64 had the highest rate for drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin (2.0 per 100,000). In 2013, non-Hispanic white persons aged 18–44 had the highest rate (7.0 per 100,000).
  • From 2000 through 2013, the age-adjusted rate for drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin increased for all regions of the country, with the greatest increase seen in the Midwest.

Progress With Electronic Health Record Adoption Among Emergency and Outpatient Departments: United States, 2006–2011

April 18, 2015 Comments off

Progress With Electronic Health Record Adoption Among Emergency and Outpatient Departments: United States, 2006–2011
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings

Data from the 2006–2011 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

  • In 2011, 84% of hospital emergency departments (EDs) used an electronic health record (EHR) system.
  • Adoption of a basic EHR system with a specific set of functionalities by EDs increased from 19% in 2007 to 54% in 2011.
  • In 2011, 73% of hospital outpatient departments (OPDs) used an EHR system, up from 29% in 2006.
  • Adoption of a basic EHR system with a specific set of functionalities by OPDs increased from 9% in 2007 to 57% in 2011.
  • From 2007 through 2011, adoption of Stage 1 Meaningful Use objectives by EDs and OPDs increased.In 2011, 14% of EDs and 16% of OPDs had EHR technology able to support nine Stage 1 Meaningful Use objectives.

Trends in Long-acting Reversible Contraception Use Among U.S. Women Aged 15–44

April 17, 2015 Comments off

Trends in Long-acting Reversible Contraception Use Among U.S. Women Aged 15–44
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings

Data from the National Survey of Family Growth

  • Use of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) declined between 1982 and 1988, remained stable through 2002, and then increased nearly five-fold in the last decade among women aged 15–44, from 1.5% in 2002 to 7.2% in 2011–2013.
  • The percentage of women using LARCs has remained highest among women aged 25–34, with more than twice as many women aged 25–34 (11.1%) using LARCs in 2011–2013 compared with women aged 15–24 (5.0%) and aged 35–44 (5.3%).
  • After decreasing between 1982 and 1988 and remaining stable from 1988 through 1995, LARC-use patterns diverged among Hispanic, non-Hispanic white, and non-Hispanic black women.
  • Women who have had at least one birth use LARCs at a higher rate compared with women who have had no previous births, and this difference has increased over time.

Problems Paying Medical Bills: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January 2011-June 2014

April 16, 2015 Comments off

Problems Paying Medical Bills: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January 2011-June 2014 (PDF)
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

  • The percentage of persons under age 65 who were in families having problems paying medical bills decreased from 21.3% (56.5 million) in 2011 to 17.8% (47.7 million) in the first 6 months of 2014.
  • Within each year, from 2011 through June 2014, children aged 0– 17 years were more likely than adults aged 18 – 64 to be in families having problems paying medical bills.
  • The percentage of children aged 0– 17 years who were in families having problems paying medical bills decreased from 23. 2 % in 2011 to 19.0 % in the first 6 months of 201 4.
  • In the first 6 months of 2014 , among persons under age 65, 31.2% of those who were uninsured, 24.2% of those who had public coverage, and 12.4% of those who had private coverage were in families having problems paying medical bills in the past 12 months.
  • In the first 6 months of 201 4 , 27.1% of poor, 28.0 % of near poor , and 12.6 % of not poor persons under age 65 were in families having problems paying medical bills in the past 12 months.

Emergency Department Visits for Drug Poisoning: United States, 2008–2011

April 14, 2015 Comments off

Emergency Department Visits for Drug Poisoning: United States, 2008–2011
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Key findings
Data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2008–2011

  • During 2008–2011, an average of 1.1 million emergency department (ED) visits were made each year for drug poisoning, with a visit rate of 35.4 per 10,000 persons.
  • The ED visit rate for drug poisoning was highest among persons aged 20–34. The rate declined with age after 20–34, and rates for those aged 0–19 were similar to those aged 50 and over.
  • Drug-poisoning ED visit rates did not differ by sex and age, with the exception of persons aged 35–49, where females had a higher visit rate than males. The ED visit rate for unintentional drug poisoning was higher than self-inflicted drug poisoning overall and for males, but did not differ for females.
  • About one-quarter (24.5%) of drug-poisoning ED visits resulted in hospital admission.
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